• Stolen Phone Blacklist finally coming to Canada

    Looks like a blacklist for stolen phones is finally coming to Canada. Carriers have until November next year to implement it though most should have it done before then.

    I wonder what effect this will have on the number of mobile phones on Craigslist. I also wonder how many thieves will start altering IMEI's to get around this.

    If your phone is stolen and you recover are their ways the owner can get the phone removed from the blacklist?

    Anyone here ever have their phone stolen?
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Stolen Phone Blacklist finally coming to Canada started by howard View original post
    Comments 31 Comments
    1. cloneman's Avatar
      cloneman -
      The real question is, will carriers care about unbranded phones?

      For instance, if I use an imported or unlocked phone with my carrier, and it gets stolen , will I be able to get it blocked on the big 3?
    1. tcross8361's Avatar
      tcross8361 -
      My daughter did. A couple years ago she got a brand new LG Rumor Touch for Christmas. Two months later someone stole it out of her locker at school.
    1. kav2001c's Avatar
      kav2001c -
      Interesting but most big thefts are always shipping phones internationally
      Same pro and con as the US registry
    1. ceredon's Avatar
      ceredon -
      Quote Originally Posted by kav2001c View Post
      Interesting but most big thefts are always shipping phones internationally
      Same pro and con as the US registry
      I believe the idea is to hook this into the [C]EIR/IMEI DB system that includes many international carriers. So it should be a little more effective than if it was Canadian only. Rogers has been a member for years (I think Telua and Bell are too) but have refused to allow customer phones to be added. They only use it for phones stolen directly from them, from stores or warehouses.

      That's what makes the CWTA claim that it will cost the carriers $20 million to set up so laughable. It's already set up and has been for years. Cost to expand it to customers is effectively $0. They make it sound like they are being so benevolent by not passing the $20 million onto their customers.

      The real questions, as others have mentioned, are will they add phones that were not bought from a carrier and how does one get a phone removed that was illegitimately added.
    1. kav2001c's Avatar
      kav2001c -
      Quote Originally Posted by ceredon View Post
      The real questions, as others have mentioned, are will they add phones that were not bought from a carrier and how does one get a phone removed that was illegitimately added.
      I would assume not, otherwise as you infer there are too many ways to illegitimately hassle someone
      Usually how the internal database works is the device has to be active on an account before it can get blacklisted
    1. ceredon's Avatar
      ceredon -
      Quote Originally Posted by kav2001c View Post
      I would assume not, otherwise as you infer there are too many ways to illegitimately hassle someone
      Usually how the internal database works is the device has to be active on an account before it can get blacklisted
      Well, one can always call and have the IMEI added to the equipment history list manually when one buys a phone. That way they have a record of it and if something happens the request could be made. Still doesn't mean they'll do anything.
    1. Blade_27's Avatar
      Blade_27 -
      My second phone a Nokia 6133 was stolen out of my locker at work
    1. static's Avatar
      static -
      The trouble with this plan is it creates secondary victims. A thief can continue to sell phones, the victim becomes the buyer who believes they bought a legit phone plus the original owner. Insisting upon the original purchase receipt does not keep a phone off the registry either. It is likely to quiet the re-sell business after buyers get burnt a few times.
    1. labjr's Avatar
      labjr -
      The industry created this problem. They want to charge $800 for phones and make $1200 on the phone over the contract. They should be responsible for coming up with a solution that works.

      I hope the ridiculous phone prices will start dropping. Google Nexus 4 is a good start. I think it's time Apple is left in the dust by much cheaper asian competition.

      When unlocked, no contract smartphones are all under $100 like they should be, then theft won't be a problem anymore.
    1. cloneman's Avatar
      cloneman -
      The real solution is honeypots.

      Unattended phones and laptops that are a trap, GPS enabled, with officers ready to intervene.

      Quote Originally Posted by static View Post
      The trouble with this plan is it creates secondary victims. A thief can continue to sell phones, the victim becomes the buyer who believes they bought a legit phone plus the original owner. Insisting upon the original purchase receipt does not keep a phone off the registry either. It is likely to quiet the re-sell business after buyers get burnt a few times.
      Yeah this is gonna be a big issue. The carriers should come up with a system that allows one to submit an IMEI for verification, and the seller of course needs to allow whatever time the carrier decides is enough to allow reporting...

      Somehow I doubt its in the carrier's interests to facilitate kijiji transactions
    1. ceredon's Avatar
      ceredon -
      Quote Originally Posted by cloneman View Post
      The real solution is honeypots.

      Unattended phones and laptops that are a trap, GPS enabled, with officers ready to intervene.



      Yeah this is gonna be a big issue. The carriers should come up with a system that allows one to submit an IMEI for verification, and the seller of course needs to allow whatever time the carrier decides is enough to allow reporting...

      Somehow I doubt its in the carrier's interests to facilitate kijiji transactions
      Carriers won't do anything to make buying/selling easy for others.
      Lord [CWTA CEO] said customers are well advised to purchase devices from established dealers to assure that the product has not been stolen.
      That tells you what they think.
    1. howard's Avatar
      howard -
      Quote Originally Posted by labjr View Post
      The industry created this problem. They want to charge $800 for phones and make $1200 on the phone over the contract. They should be responsible for coming up with a solution that works.

      I hope the ridiculous phone prices will start dropping. Google Nexus 4 is a good start. I think it's time Apple is left in the dust by much cheaper asian competition.

      When unlocked, no contract smartphones are all under $100 like they should be, then theft won't be a problem anymore.
      While Apple and Samsung are making tons of money right now the rest of the industry isn't. Still, I think prices will go down over time.
    1. theplayground's Avatar
      theplayground -
      I just wonder if there will be any incentives for those who bought stolen phones in some way or another to return them, and then have them returned to their rightful owners.

      I lost an iphone, and was told it was blacklisted, but then what.
    1. hybrid.09's Avatar
      hybrid.09 -
      What if you unknowingly buy a phone from a classified ad online and turns out it was stolen and sold to you. What then, you're stuck with a lemon that you paid a lot of money for? How were you to know it was stolen.
    1. ceredon's Avatar
      ceredon -
      Quote Originally Posted by hybrid.09 View Post
      What if you unknowingly buy a phone from a classified ad online and turns out it was stolen and sold to you. What then, you're stuck with a lemon that you paid a lot of money for? How were you to know it was stolen.
      Buying stolen goods doesn't carry a lot of protection legally, even when done unknowingly.
    1. kintamanate's Avatar
      kintamanate -
      Douchebag cellphone carrier finally accepts "bring your own phone".

      Turns out it's stolen *ahem* found *ahememurrrh* bought on Craigslist.
    1. kintamanate's Avatar
      kintamanate -
      Quote Originally Posted by hybrid.09 View Post
      What if you unknowingly buy a phone from a classified ad online and turns out it was stolen and sold to you. What then, you're stuck with a lemon that you paid a lot of money for? How were you to know it was stolen.
      It's your fault for not testing the phone out there - in person with a SIM card to see if you can in fact make calls on it. Still not convinced? Have the seller meet you at the phone's carrier store and ask the sales staff to verify the IMEI is valid and not blocked.

      In my signature I have a few phones I've bought over the years. I have never put myself in a situation that I ended up with a "lemon", as you put it. There are steps you can take if you're unsure of your purchase. Would you buy a car from someone without turning on the engine or driving around the block once? No? Then why buy a phone without turning it on, popping your SIM card in and making a call?
    1. kintamanate's Avatar
      kintamanate -
      Quote Originally Posted by ceredon View Post
      They make it sound like they are being so benevolent by not passing the $20 million onto their customers.
      .
      Who are you kidding? Of course they will pass it on to the customers - in the form of inflated plans and add-ons, claiming "paying for the infrastructure".
    1. ceredon's Avatar
      ceredon -
      Quote Originally Posted by kintamanate View Post
      Who are you kidding? Of course they will pass it on to the customers - in the form of inflated plans and add-ons, claiming "paying for the infrastructure".
      Oh, I have no doubt you are right that they will charge us more. I dispute that there is anything close to $20 million in new costs for them to pass on. The system is already in place. They'll basically hike our fees for
      nothing, why posing it as a huge new expense they aren't charging us for. It's total BS.
    1. soccerballtux's Avatar
      soccerballtux -
      Quote Originally Posted by kintamanate View Post
      It's your fault for not testing the phone out there - in person with a SIM card to see if you can in fact make calls on it. Still not convinced? Have the seller meet you at the phone's carrier store and ask the sales staff to verify the IMEI is valid and not blocked.

      In my signature I have a few phones I've bought over the years. I have never put myself in a situation that I ended up with a "lemon", as you put it. There are steps you can take if you're unsure of your purchase. Would you buy a car from someone without turning on the engine or driving around the block once? No? Then why buy a phone without turning it on, popping your SIM card in and making a call?
      ^ that's not how the database works. It takes up to two days for the carrier to do an IMEI sweep of the devices on their network. If it were event based (phone logs onto network) then what you say would be true; but it's not.