• Commentary and Analysis

    by Published on 10-19-2016 02:49 PM
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    I’ve been playing with the Motorola Moto Z and some Moto Mod accessories for it. I recently checked out the JBL SoundBoost Speaker Moto Mod. Initially, I was unsure of how much sense a proprietary accessory would make, but Motorola managed to make it work and I loved the SoundBoost.



    Next up is their Moto Insta-Share Projector. It’s a pic projector that attaches to the back of a Motorola Moto Z family phone (currently there are 3 compatible Z family phones with presumably more to come). There are pogo plugs on the back of the projector which mate to connectors on the back of a Moto Z. It uses magnets to hold it in place which I assure you, hold it very securely. ...
    by Published on 10-19-2016 08:00 AM
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    Some embargo must have been lifted yesterday; around lunchtime my RSS feeds and YouTube queue were suddenly filled with reviews of Google's new iPhone, like the video you see here from The Verge's Dieter Bohn.

    This morning's plan was to post some links for your reading pleasure, but this longtime Nexus fan couldn't resist the urge to throw in his own snarky comments along with them. Let's start with Dieter, who says that the Pixel phones go "toe to toe" with the iPhone, and that the Pixel "doesn't fall down". This gets right to my fundamental problem with Pixel. It copies the iPhone so much, from its exorbitant price right down to the long-press actions on app icons, that it begs the question: Why wouldn't someone just buy an iPhone? ...
    by Published on 10-13-2016 09:44 AM
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    I’ve been playing with a Motorola Moto Z and a few Moto Mod accessories for a few days and thought I’d share some thoughts on how they work together.

    But first off, I have to mention what really jumps out about the Z is just how thin it is. I mean how can something this skinny pack flagship specs? What’s more impressive is that they managed to do this without having to resort to a gigantic bezel or skimping on the battery capacity.



    They didn’t skimp on features either, on the back are series of 16 pogo pins which allow you to attach a variety of add-ons called Moto Mods. Motorola isn’t messing around either, they sent me 4 different Mods with the Z including:


    • a serious sounding speaker from JBL
    • external battery pack for extended Pokemon Go so I can finally catch enough Dratini to evolve it
    • Camera with 10x optical zoom from Hasselblad
    • Pico Projector so the wife and I can watch Brooklyn Nine Nine on the ceiling




    These can all attach to the back of the Moto Z using magnets. In case you’re wondering; Yes, they attach very securely - they won’t come off unless you want it to and even then it takes a bit of coaxing.



    As it turns out the thinness, allows the Z to stay manageable even when you have a Moto Mod attached.



    So, far the one I’ve used most is the JBL speaker. I’ll talk more about the other mods in another write up. It’s considerably thicker than the Z and at 145g it basically doubles the weight of the package. Fortunately it’s very sculpted so it doesn’t feel too strange in my hand when I have it connected.
    ...
    by Published on 10-13-2016 08:30 AM
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    $1,179 CAD. That's what Google Canada wants for a 128 GB Pixel XL. To say that I'm not interested would be a massive understatement.

    And it's not like I don't love gadgets; it's just that I buy enough of them to have a pretty good idea of what I'm willing to spend. As a reference, here's my own personal computer allowance:

    Desktop computer - $2,000 - upgraded every two to three years
    Laptop computer - $1,000 - upgraded every two to three years
    Smartphone - $500 - upgraded every year
    Smartwatch - $250 - upgraded every year

    But wait, you say, you can get a 32 GB Pixel for only $899 CAD. Yeah, no thanks... over the summer I bought a ThinkPad for the same price. ...
    by Published on 10-11-2016 08:00 AM
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    Samsung's strategy of beating Apple to market with their own flagship phablet has now completely, irreversibly and permanently backfired. Early this morning The Wall Street Journal reported that the product has been discontinued altogether.

    In Canada and the USA it was the carriers who bore the brunt of Note7 returns during the initial recall, and when it became clear that replacement devices were also faulty it was time to cut their losses—on Sunday AT&T decided to stop selling the Note7, followed soon after by Best Buy, Sprint and Verizon.

    For Samsung it's been a disaster on three fronts—manufacturing, sales and PR. A user of a faulty replacement Note7 received a text message from Samsung that was clearly not meant for him:

    Just now got this. I can try and slow him down if we think it will matter, or we just let him do what he keeps threatening to do and see if he does it
    All this has at least one mobile industry expert—Tomi Ahonen—to wonder if this is the end of the Note line altogether. According to him, the damage to Samsung's brand will last for at least a year, if not more. ...
    by Published on 10-06-2016 08:00 AM
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    Yesterday BGR found AnTuTu's listing for the top ten smartphones of September on their Chinese site—they should be published in English anytime now. Anyway, the story, according to BGR, is that the new iPhones "crush" the iPhones from Google (aka Pixel). Thing is, the Google iPhones haven't even been benchmarked yet; the claim is based solely on the fact that the number three handset is powered by the same Snapdragon 821 processor as the Pixel (aka Google iPhone).

    Sure, that's fair. But when I look at these results I see a completely different story. I see a chart that's dominated by Chinese OEMs, and of the seven Chinese brands in this list, only one of them—the OnePlus 3—is available for purchase here in the Americas. ...
    by Published on 10-05-2016 08:30 AM
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    After all the Pixel-related hoopla yesterday Android Police confirmed with Google that the Nexus brand is effectively dead. I think I've come to terms with it; Nexus hasn't really been the same since late 2013 anyway, when the Nexus 5—codenamed hammerhead—went on sale.

    The Nexus 5 finished what the Nexus 4 started, offering high-end specs at an affordable price. The final pieces to this puzzle that were added by the 5 include a full HD screen, LTE radio and optically-stabilized rear camera. Battery life wasn't spectacular, but this was offset somewhat by the convenience of inductive charging.

    And, of course, being a Nexus meant that hammerhead was a modder's dream. It was my first testbed for Xposed Modules, ran one of my all-time favourite custom ROMs, SlimKat, and was even compatible with MultiROM, allowing me to boot into Android, Sailfish and Ubuntu all on the same phone. Hammerhead continues to be useful to this day; it's currently the only device that can run Maru OS, transforming a humble smartphone into a fully-functioning Debian-powered desktop computer.

    You could go so far as to call The Nexus 5 the anti-iPhone. Where Apple's flagship was locked down and expensive, Google's alternative was open and affordable. It seems to have sold pretty well, too; I still see the occasional Nexus 5 when I'm out in the world. 2013 actually saw two Nexus successes: the second-gen Nexus 7 tablet was (and is) also pretty great. ...
    by Published on 09-23-2016 08:00 AM
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    Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have just published the results of a two-year study on wearable technology and weight loss. A total of 471 participants in the study, men and women aged 18-35, were weeded down into two groups; the group using fitness trackers lost less weight on average than the ones that didn't.

    All of the initial subjects got six months of a low-calorie diet, prescribed increases in physical activity and group counseling. From that larger group subjects were selected at random for an additional 18 months of phone counseling, SMS reminders and access to either a website or a wearable device.

    The results: After 2 years, the non-wearable group lost 13 lbs on average, and the wearable group only 7.7 lbs. ...
    by Published on 09-21-2016 08:30 AM
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    Sometime overnight Allo, Google's mobile-first messaging app, went live. Available for both Android and iOS, it may or may not be ready for download in your country or to your specific device—but Android users can at least grab the officiall package from Android Police's APK Mirror.

    Reading through the feature list on the official website I can already tell that this app is not for me; it's meant for a user whose primary—possibly only—connection to the Internet is through their smartphone. There's currently no desktop client for it, nor do there seem to be any data portability options. You register for Allo with a Google account and a phone number, though the Google hook-up is only necessary if you want to interact with Google's chatbot, @google.

    Out of the gate Allo faces some stiff competition from more established players in the rich messaging racket, including Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp and a slew of alternatives whose popularity will depend on what part of the world you call home. So why even bother? ...
    by Published on 09-15-2016 08:30 AM
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    "There isn't really going to be much if any involvement from the Inc this time around and I'm taking on a lot of stuff on my own to try and keep us moving forward."

    That's an uncharacteristically candid Steve Kondik, commenting in a commit thread for CyanogenMod, the first and most famous custom ROM for Android devices. It was discovered by Android Police earlier this week, and if nothing else is an indication that the Nougat-powered version of CyanogenMod, CM14, might face some delays.

    To Kondik's credit, CyanogenMod development was largely unaffected by the folly of the corporate counterpart, Cyanogen, Inc. A quick summary of how that went: What I initially saw as a savvy move to bring a Western-friendly OS to the rising tide of Chinese Android phones was squandered through arrogance and the downright sleazy deal with Micromax that got OnePlus banned from India. At the end of it all, "the Inc." had little to show but a few custom apps and a questionable deal with Microsoft. ...
    by Published on 09-12-2016 08:30 AM
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    XDA was the bearer of bad news for Pokémon GO players over the weekend; the latest update to the game locks out Android users with root, and jailbroken iPhones as well. The official line from Niantic Labs is as follows:

    "We continue to focus on eliminating bots and scrapers from Pokémon GO. Rooted or jailbroken devices are not supported by Pokémon GO. Remember to download Pokémon GO from the official Google Play Store or iTunes App Store only."

    Okay, fair enough... Niantic wants only to keep an even playing field for everyone participating, right? It's a noble idea, but there are at least three problems with the way they've chosen to implement it. First, the game's root-block can be bypassed—I wouldn't call it easy but for someone hell-bent on being a Pokémon cheat it's certainly doable. Second, there's the rather insulting presumption that a user who has taken full control of their Android or iOS device has done so only to punk the game. And third, there is the continuing, if unspoken, narrative by software companies that rooted or jailbroken phones are somehow unsafe. If you've rooted or jailbroken your own device then this is just not true.

    So now, if you're a Pokémon player with root, your only choices are to give it up or bypass the root/jailbreak checks. The game itself is almost certainly compromised already and will continue to be; Niantic has really accomplished nothing here. ...
    by Published on 09-08-2016 08:00 AM
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    I caught an interesting feature on the new iPhones yesterday, on BuzzFeed, of all places. It's all about the 3.5mm audio plug—or rather, the lack thereof, on the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

    Apple isn't the first phone-maker to nix the headphone jack, but as the world's most valuable brand it stands to face the most blowback from its customers. So it only makes sense that the first official explanation from the company got published in something other than your typical tech blog.

    Here's the relevant snippet straight from the source—Apple’s senior VP of hardware engineering Dan Riccio:

    At the top of both devices is something called the “driver ledge”—a small printed circuit board that drives the iPhone’s display and its backlight. Historically, Apple placed it there to accommodate improvements in battery capacity, where it was out of the way. But according to Riccio, the driver ledge interfered with the iPhone 7 line’s new larger camera systems, so Apple moved the ledge lower in both devices. But there, it interfered with other components, particularly the audio jack.

    So the company’s engineers tried removing the jack.
    This design decision opened up some intriguing possibilities, like a bigger battery, IP7 water resistance and a "Taptic Engine" right behind the home button. All of these features are now standard on the 7 and 7 Plus. ...
    by Published on 08-26-2016 08:30 AM
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    What the hell...? Hang on, I'll get to it.

    So Linux celebrated its 25th birthday yesterday, an event observed with a particularly good blog post on XDA. If you didn't know, Linux powers great swaths of the Internet—including these forums—as well as the world's dominant operation system, Android. Full disclosure: the desktop computer that I'm posting this from also runs Linux, so I've a bit of bias here. B)

    As awesome as Linux is, its software license is as big a deal or even bigger. Linux creator Linus Torvalds has called it "a defining factor" in the success of Linux; its official moniker is the GPL.

    GPL is an acronym for the GNU General Public License, which will hopefully explain the logo above. But GNU itself is also a recursive acronym for "GNU's not UNIX"—some lame programmer humour from GPL creator Richard Stallman, but also a pointed dig at the UNIX software running the mainframe computers that he used while studying at MIT. The GPL is quite unlike any other commercial software license in that it's founded on what Stallman calls the four freedoms—and if this sounds like some hippie bs it absolutely is. Silicon Valley as we know it today has direct ties to Haight-Ashbury's 1967 Summer of Love. Some forward-thinking minds back then saw how computers could change the world. ...
    by Published on 07-25-2016 08:30 AM
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    The infamous quote from Cyanogen, Inc. CEO Kirk McMaster, taken from an interview with Forbes in 2015. And the image accompanying an XDA tweet, bringing news that the days of Cyanogen OS may, in fact, be numbered.

    Android Police reported Friday afternoon that a significant portion of the company's workforce have been cut loose:

    Accounts indicate that employees were called into meetings, sometimes in groups, and told they were being let go. In Seattle, Steve Kondik himself is allegedly conducting the layoffs. At this time, we've been told roughly 30 out of the 136 people Cyanogen Inc. employs - around 20% of the workforce - have been let go. It's unclear if that number may change more in the coming hours and days. According to one source, the systems and QA teams in Palo Alto and Seattle have been heavily cut, with Cyanogen's smaller offices in Lisbon and India reportedly being essentially gutted. Community support members were allegedly removed, too.
    There are rumours that the company will abandon their Android OS entirely, focusing on apps instead. The employees laid off were mostly those working in the open source arm of the company. It won't mean the end of CyanogenMod, necessarily, because the ROM is open source. But it's definitely bad news for the commercial version of that product, Cyanogen OS. ...
    by Published on 07-13-2016 07:45 AM
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    Just yesterday J.D. Power released the results of a new survey, ranking the Apple Watch highest of all smartwatches in customer satisfaction. There's just one problem: another survey run by Quartz reports that nobody actually wants to buy one.

    Could they both be right?

    Here are the key findings from the J.D. Power 2016 Smartwatch Device Satisfaction Report. Note that customer satisfaction is calculated on a scale of 1,000 possible points:

    Apple (852) ranks highest in customer satisfaction with smartwatches and performs particularly well in comfort, styling/appearance and ease of use.

    Samsung (842) ranks second, performing well in customer service, display size and phone features.

    Overall customer satisfaction with smartwatches is 847.
    And here's a summary of the findings by Quartz:

    In early 2015, before the launch of the watch Quartz ran a survey asking iPhone owners if they planned to buy one. Only about 5% of owners thought it very likely they’d buy a watch in the next 12 months. A little over a year later, not too much has changed: Only about 8% of those surveyed this time said they owned an Apple Watch.

    The outlook for the next year isn’t much better: Less than 5% of respondents surveyed that didn’t already own an Apple Watch said they were either extremely likely or very likely to purchase an Apple Watch if a new version is released this year.
    The survey respondents, identified as a sample group of 534 US iPhone owners, singled out price as the biggest barrier to the purchase of an Apple Watch. Over 60% of them said that no new feature would justify the purchase of a new version at the launch price of the first. ...
    by Published on 07-11-2016 08:20 AM
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    I think it's safe to say that Pokémon GO has become the most successful augmented reality game ever, for the simple fact that it's already much more popular than the only other AR game I can think of, Ingress. For its follow-up to that title the same company, Niantic Labs, has partnered with Nintendo of America to release what appears to be a runaway hit.

    Though officially only available for download in Australia, New Zealand and the USA Pokémon GO can already boast tens of millions of players, and is so much of a strain on Niantic's servers that a wider rollout of the game to other markets has been put on pause.

    So what's the big deal about this title? How do you play it? And is there a way to get it if it's not yet available in your country? Read onwards, and I'll try to answer each of these questions as best I can. ...
    by Published on 07-08-2016 08:08 AM
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    There was an interesting point/counterpoint that caught my eye on the Android reddit this week—an editorial by Phil Nickinson of Android Central and a rebuttal by a Twitter user on Medium, that company's blogging platform.

    The Android Central op-ed, entitled The single reason I trust Google with my data, seeks to address the shock of users who discover that Google has been tracking their location through their Android phone. Location tracking can be turned off, of course, but more important is Google's transparency about the personal data it collects from you. ...
    by Published on 07-05-2016 08:10 AM
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    The good news is that if you own a Nexus or Samsung device, you're probably safe. For everyone else, full disk encryption on Android can be cracked.

    That's the verdict from Israeli security expert Gal Beniamini, and the subject of two features by Ars Technica and Digit over the weekend. The cause of the vulnerability has to do with how FDE works on Android, but the reason why so many devices are vulnerable is ultimately the lack of security updates available for them. ...
    by Published on 06-20-2016 08:05 AM
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    Yesterday morning I came across a post on the OnePlus subreddit with evidence that Android Authority had published, then deleted, an overly-critical opinion piece on the OnePlus 3. Unfortunately (for AA) a Google cache of the post—Strike Out: OnePlus’ 3rd flagship isn’t adding up for me—can still be read in its entirety, along with comments posted before it was pulled.

    So why was it pulled? Is the invisible hand of OnePlus somehow controlling the tech media and preventing disparaging words about its new flagship ever seeing the light of day? Or is there another, less sinister reason? ...
    by Published on 06-16-2016 08:00 AM
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    While CyanogenMod remains, for the moment, the godsend for Android modders, Cyanogen OS—which first became widely known on the original OnePlus One—is becoming more and more integrated with a variety of Microsoft services.

    It started back in April of 2015, when Cyanogen, Inc. announced a strategic partnership with Microsoft:

    "Under the partnership, Cyanogen will integrate and distribute Microsoft’s consumer apps and services across core categories, including productivity, messaging, utilities, and cloud-based services. As part of this collaboration, Microsoft will create native integrations on Cyanogen OS, enabling a powerful new class of experiences."

    In February of this year, Cyanogen announced their MOD platform—nothing to do whatsoever with the open source CyanogenMod, but instead a means for developers to hook their wares into Cyanogen OS. Now, a new version of CM OS has just been released, and Microsoft products and services are all over it. ...
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