• Commentary and Analysis

    by Published on 09-23-2013 04:12 PM
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    Itís that time of year again. Apple just introduced their new 5s (and 5c), which is supposed to be twice as fast as last yearís 5. Theyíve upgraded the camera and added a new fingerprint reader. Oh, and now you can get it in gold. How good is the new 5s? Why should you buy that instead of an Android phone? Read on!

    Comparing Android and iPhone is always really difficult because theyíre so different. If they were restaurants, Android would be an all you can eat buffet (a really good one) while iOS is more of a fancy restaurant with small portions. Both appeal to two different sets of people. Heck, many iOS users will view the fancy restaurant comment as a compliment while Android would view that comment as an insult if it were said about Android and vice-versa.

    Iím generalizing here but iPhoneís strength is how well everything is integrated into one package. Thereís no custom launchers or anything, you do things Appleís way or else youíll have to wait forever for a new jailbreak. You get Appleís core apps and then you go download more at the App Store.

    Generally speaking, I think the good apps on iOS are higher quality than the good apps on Android. I could write a whole article about this but Iíll just leave it at that

    With Android, itís more about choice. Since thereís so much choice, things arenít quite as polished as they are on iOS (generally speaking). However, since thereís so much choice, there are many more types of apps - this will appeal to who like to tweak and mod their phone. ...
    by Published on 09-19-2013 07:45 AM
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    Forget this misleading headline from The Verge; in my mind the Cyanogen team has already built a better version of Android. With some eight million tracked users -- and a two or threefold more who opt out of statistical representation -- CyanogenMod might already be more popular than Windows Phone.

    The real news then, is that the Cyanogen team has raised $7 million in venture capital to form Cyanogen, Inc. And the even bigger news than that, the "how is this even possible" news, is that they will somehow manage to release a ROM installer through Google Play.

    As is the style of the times, founder Steve Kondik and Koushik Dutta eschewed the traditional press conference and instead went straight to reddit for an "ask us anything" session. Here are some highlights.

    ...
    by Published on 09-18-2013 08:54 PM
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    When Howard asked me to review the new Samsung Galaxy Mega, I had already read what he wrote and wondered whether I could do this device justiceÖ without being offensive. I believe in the value of joy in life. A smile and giggle are exactly what our world needs. It's not that I take the ask of Howard lightly; because it's truly a privilege to contribute my thoughts. The problem here is the fact that this smartphone is comical. Let the fun begin!


    There aren't many other things in life that are 6.3" that you can laugh at, and if they do it's time to chop it off and cut your losses. Can you picture those creative South Koreans in a scrum (Project Management talk for brainstorming) discussing the latest rerun of Baywatch and discovering the Western world's affinity with big things that defy all biology and reason? Perhaps across the hall in the design room, Samsung engineers just finished watching Zoolander and got the joke about the tiny Motorola flip phone. And automagically the Samsung Galaxy Mega was born! Finally this was the moment that Asians could succumb to the universal truth that bigger is better (that's what she said) and bigger is more satisfying (that's what she said) and size matters!

    Bottom line for this smartphone is simple: you are trying to make up for your life's shortcomings. Take that every and any which way you like. You can try to tell me about the hardware performance or that it's replacing two devices - I won't believe it for a second. Samsung is boldly making you pay for a joke where you are the punch line.

    Allow me to conclude by encouraging the rest of us in our fragile states of insecurity. Let's face it, every single person has more than one part of their created being that is embarrassing. We are all using "stuff" to make up for something and I admit I'm more like the president of that club (or mayor of that town). Take for instance our first stop: I use a 27" BenQ monitor ...and the Mega isn't bigger than that!
    ...
    by Published on 09-18-2013 08:20 AM
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    Back in the dark days of Gingerbread, MIUI was a bright light in Android design -- a custom ROM that offered insane theming and unexpected security features, all wrapped up in an interface that was beautifully, unapologetically, a lot like iOS.

    MIUI is still around, of course. Maybe I'm wrong on this, but it just doesn't seem to get as much press as it once did. It's certainly harder to find; my girlfriend is a fan and wanted it installed on her new/my old 2012 Nexus 7, but from three available sources I could find only a single ROM for it -- one that, inexplicably, comes with phone and SMS apps... for a WiFi tablet.

    Things seemed to be a lot better for MIUI a year and a half ago, when yours truly was happily running it on his Nexus S.

    If it's indeed true that MIUI has faded into the background for the Android modding community, what happened, exactly? I've a few theories on that.

    ...
    by Published on 09-10-2013 01:13 PM
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    Today Apple announced the low cost (for Apple) iPhone 5c which will be $99 (in the 'States) for the 16GB on contract and the 5s which will be $199 (US price) for 16GB on contract. Both will be available for pre-order on Sept 13th. You'll be able to buy it on the 20th.

    C is for Colour? Cheap?

    Now instead of lowering the price of the iPhone 5 theyíre replacing it with the 5c. It will come in green, white, blue, red and yellow. It has a unibody plastic (hard-coated polycarbonate) back while the front is black

    Call me shallow but these new colours do look like fun.

    To me these phones look like an iPhone 5 with a colour plastic shell behind it. The sides really remind me of a Nokia Lumia.

    Spec-wise it looks just like the iPhone 5 but with a slightly larger battery. So thatís a A6 chip, HD front facing camera, 8MP camera with a Ďhybrid IR filterí (not sure if the 5 has this).

    More LTE bands than any other smartphone (so is that 5, 6 or 7 bands?) and Bluetooth 4.0 support.

    Pricing will be $99 for the 16GB while the 32GB will be $199. Not bad for an iPhone.

    Theyíre also bringing out new cases for the 5c which have holes cut out in the back (so that the case doesnít protect the phone?) so you can see the original colour underneath. These cases look really cheap. They will be $29.

    So yeah, it's basically an iPhone 5 with a plastic back.

    Both the 5c and the 5s have very impressive LTE support: You get band:

    1 (2100 MHz)
    2 (1900 MHz)
    3 (1800 MHz)
    4 (AWS)
    5 (850 MHz)
    8 (900 MHz)
    13 (700c MHz)
    17 (700b MHz)
    19 (800 MHz)
    20 (800 DD)
    25 (1900 MHz)

    Unfortunately for Rogers and Bell users Band 7 (2600Mhz) is missing. Still you get bands you can use now as well as bands you'll be able to use later as carriers re-farm spectrum for LTE.

    iPhone 5s

    The new iPhone 5 replacement will be called the iPhone 5s and it will come in black (new space grey), gold and silver. Gold - yuck.

    Under the hood is a new Apple A7 chip. Itís a 64-bit chip (Nintendo 64 FTW!), not sure what the point of this since the iPhone will have less than 4GB of RAM. iOS 7 will be 64-bit. Maybe theyíll use the A7 on some low-end desktop Macís or the next-gen iPad will have 4GB of RAM.

    Anyways, the iPhone 5s will also run 32bit apps just fine. Apple is claiming itís 2x as fast with graphics that are faster than 5x faster than the iPhone 5.

    Thereís a M7 motion co-processor which continuously measures, motion data, accelerator, gyroscope and compass. This will be good for many health-monitoring apps. Doesnít the Moto X have something similar?

    They claim the battery allows up to 10hrs of LTE browsing (8hrs on the old 5).

    The camera now comes with a F2.2 lens with 5 elements while the sensor is now 15% bigger - the pixels are 1.5u (vs 2.0 on the HTC One). Resolution is still 8 megapixels.

    Camera software can now shoot multiple shots and choose the best one. You can adjust the colour tone of the flash. There are 2 flashes, a cool and a warm one. You can combine the 2 of them for up to 1000 variations. Thatís cool.

    Auto-image stabilization is coming soon. Itís not Ďrealí but rather it takes a lot of pictures at 10 frames per second, averages the light levels but picks the sharpest photo. Would it kill Apple to offer a stabilized lens?

    When shooting video thereís a 120 frames per second at 720p. Thatís pretty cool.

    The photos, HDRís and panoramas from the new iPhone look really impressive. The sensor looks like it has really good dynamic range.

    There is a new fingerprint reader (Touch ID, I guess iTouch was already taken) that is built-into the home button. The fingerprint ready is square shaped instead of just a short rectangle. The square shape means it can read in any orientation which should make it very usable. The reader will be covered with sapphire crystal (like on a fancy watch) so it will be very difficult to scratch.

    Besides unlocking your phone you now donít have to enter your iTunes password constantly.

    Pricing will be $199/299/399 for the 16/32/64GB. Iím really disappointed theyíre still releasing 16GB base models.

    Pre-orders for both the 5c and 5s will start Sept 13th with release on Sept 20th (both Canada and the US).

    Apple also announced that the iPhone 4s and 5 will be getting iOS 7 on Sept 18th

    iWork, iMovie, Pages, Numbers, Keynote are now all free for new iOS devices.

    Epic is releasing Infinity Blade III which will conclude the trilogy. Canít wait for that since they stopped releasing DLCís for 2. Itís to demonstrate the Open GL ES 3.0.
    ...
    by Published on 09-09-2013 07:45 AM
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    Though it's almost a month old now, this story in the National Post still gets my blood boiling every time I start thinking about it. In a nutshell, the TTC has hired a contractor to bring wireless service to Toronto's underground. And none of the Big Three carriers in this country are interested.

    Granted, the TTC is hardly a world-class public transportation system anyway, so it's business as usual on the so-called "Better Way". I'm also keenly aware that a lot of Torontonians don't actually want cellular service in subways; it's their last public refuge from people talking loudly on their phones, after all.

    I don't know what can be done about the Big Three not playing ball with the TTC, but I do know from personal travel experience what it's like to have mobile service on underground trains. Here are some random observations from some places I've been...

    ...
    by Published on 09-07-2013 01:18 PM
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    Kizagjo just passed me this interesting article.

    It talks about how Amazon is trying to build a phone that will be given away. I'm talking free as in no contract. Will this free phone have any strings (non contract) attached to it?

    What effect will a free Amazon phone have on manufacturers of high-end phones like Apple and Samsung. Unlike Apple and Samsung, Amazon's reasons for making a phone are different. While Samsung and Apple sell phones for profit, Amazon's reasoning for giving away a phone may be to lock people into Amazon's ecosystem - will you have to buy stuff from Amazon? Where will you get the software from?

    Of course before Amazon can do this they also face other challenges like who will build this phone?

    If Amazon had a free phone and it didn't suck, would you consider using it or would you pay $200-$300 and stick to your Galaxies and iPhones? ...
    by Published on 09-03-2013 08:18 AM
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    The news broke yesterday that Verizon will not be saving Canada from its incumbent carriers, choosing instead to buy out the rather large stake owned by UK-based Vodafone. You'll be reading lots about this in the news today, but the way I see it one reaction will trump all others, and it will come from Industry Canada -- specifically, Industry Minister James Moore.

    Our government and wireless industry have waged a very high profile war of words against each other over the past month, and the unspoken message lost therein seems to be that the 2008 spectrum auction has failed.

    Remember 2008? Thanks to a set-aside of AWS spectrum there was a small batch of new carriers setting up shop in 2010. Most notable among them were Mobilicity and WIND Mobile, offering unheard of unlimited service at amazingly low prices. The only gotcha was their small footprint, limited to urban areas.

    Fast forward to the summer of 2013 and these upstart carriers are making news mostly as targets for acquisition. Mobilicity came very close to a friendly takeover by Telus before Ottawa stepped in and shot it down; WIND had its own takeover hopes dashed for different reasons. More importantly, with just over a million subscribers between them, neither has made a sizable dent in the Big Three's marketshare. The newest versions of the iPhone 5 now work on both networks, yet nobody seems to know this -- not even a friend who works at my local Apple Store!

    The Big Three and its lobbyists have good reason to point an accusing finger at our meddling government, calling out its 2008 set-aside policy as a bust. And with another set-aside failure looming on the horizon, what's a Minister Moore to do?

    ...
    by Published on 08-26-2013 01:29 PM
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    With school just around the corner, itís that time again. Hereís my list of the top phones for back to school.

    If you read the list though youíre probably wondering: ďWhereís the iPhone 5Ē? Well, the way I see it, buying one now is a recipe for buyerís remorse. Last year Apple announced the iPhone 5 in September, the 4s was announced 2 years ago in October. Weíre probably due for a new one soon.

    Heck, even if you donít care that a new one is just around the corner, thereís probably going to be a price cut that follows, so unless you donít have a phone at all right now, Iíd wait a month for the new iPhones to come.



    1: HTC One

    With itís sleek metal casing, the best display on the market, the best sounding speakers, the loudest headphone jack and one of the best cameras, itís easy to see why the HTC One is my top pick.

    It does lose points for not having a memory card slot but then again, it comes with 32GB of built-in storage which helps mitigate this problem. It also lacks a removable battery. Then again, so do most of the other phones here.


    ...
    by Published on 08-21-2013 12:11 PM
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    I just published a piece on my blog comparing my current costs for mobile service with what I was paying in 2010. I thought I'd copy and paste here for your reading pleasure...

    Note that while my phone plan is currently with Koodo, I depend on my Rogers LTE hotspot more than anything else. Anyway, enjoy!



    Continuing with the themes of nostalgia and progress from last week, this week I'm comparing cell phone bills -- that is, what I'm paying Koodo, Rogers and Bell this month versus what I was paying Fido almost three years ago. All in the name of finding out if Canada's upstart carriers have made The Big Three any better.

    Before I switched to Mobilicity in October of 2010, here's what I was paying Fido:

    $45 Ė City Fido unlimited local minutes;
    $30 Ė 6 GB iPhone data plan;
    $15 Ė Smartphone Value Pack (voice mail, call display and 1,000 texts);

    $90 - total per month.

    When it came time to cancel I was dinged a whopping $300 in early termination fees -- a $200 ETF for my voice plan and a separate $100 ETF for the data. Fortunately, my service with Mobilicity only cost me $35 -- as such, my monthly savings had erased that loss by the following spring.

    Unfortunately, Mobilicity couldn't give me a usable signal inside my home. I eventually moved to WIND, which was better. But after experiencing LTE data for the first time -- in Japan, of all places -- WIND's plodding data speeds would no longer do.

    Cut to present day. Here's what I'm paying for my mobile services in August, 2013:

    $31.50 - Koodo 400 national minutes & unlimited SMS, with a 10% BYOD discount;
    $15 - 300MB threshold on Koodo pay-as-you-go data;
    $40 - 5GB data threshold on my Rogers LTE hotspot;
    $20 - 500MB data threshold on my Bell LTE hotspot;

    $106.50 - total for this month.
    ...
    by Published on 08-08-2013 09:13 AM
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    Source for my info: WallStreet Journal

    Market Share:
    Android 79.3%
    iOS: 13.2%
    Windows: 3.7%
    Blackberry: 3%
    Well, the numbers are in, and Android put every other competitor over it's knee, and thoroughly spanked them.
    I don't mean it was a mild, light spanking, I mean, it was a whallop like no one has ever seen before.
    BUT while large sales of devices is good... it's all about profit for your share holders, and Apple has that number in the bag, though not as devastatingly as the device numbers, and the profit margin IS shrinking between iOS and Android.
    ...
    by Published on 08-02-2013 01:07 PM
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    The Google Neuxs 7 was just released a few days ago, so you're probably wondering if it's as good as the Nexus 7 which was released last year. I'm still working on a full review as well as a give-away but for now here's a quick comparison between the two.

    When it was released last year, I was in awe at the amount of stuff Google managed to cram into it given it's $279 price point. This time around Google doesn't disappoint giving you even more for now $20 less.

    Pretty much every spec has been improved. While the screen still measures 7" you now get a full HD 1920x1080 display, RAM is doubled to 2GB and the quad-core processor is now much more powerful. ...
    by Published on 08-01-2013 06:18 PM
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    Thanks to GSMARena for the ability to side-by-side compare cold, unfeeling spec's of a pair of phones.
    I was in CPR/First Aid training, so I can take my Early Childhood Education in September, so I was unable to view or be at any of the "live" events from Moto/Google... everything I know - so far - comes from what I've read online, and the specs as posted on GSMArena.


    THUS this is my first impression, and subject to change without notice at any time.
    ...
    by Published on 07-30-2013 06:20 PM
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    The words written in the new Wireless code are "good" to a point - they are what consumers want to hear (and most didn't know they wanted to hear it!) BUT does it go far enough to protect us? Not like we the consumers want. Already, Rogers, Bell and Telus have threatened (and are going to) raise their plan prices... simply because we no longer are leashed to them for 2 years. What this means for us, is higher device costs, and higher monthly rates, for less service, and less likeable customer care reps.

    The price plans as shown on MobileSyrup.com (here) are $10 higher or more, and have less data (what is this? 2009?!) and less minutes... but I guess that's what we have to get used to right?

    Then we have Verizon who makes a bold statement that they are now eyeing Canada. Bell is scared, as seen in their Open Letter to Canadians, and Rogers and Telus have both said similar things. Anyone remember Telus' CEO saying "Canadians' don't mind paying more per month"? Probably one of the most stupid things I've ever heard.
    ...
    by Published on 07-15-2013 10:41 AM
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    TELUS just announced their new 2yr TELUS SharePlus plans. The plans consist of a separate voice and a data charges. You pick the class of device(s) you want to bring and then how much data you want shared between them. The new plans are meant to encourage users to use more than one device from TELUS (like a phone and a tablet).

    Here's the pricing:



    Let's whip out or calculators. With a 3 year term, let's assume you buy a Galaxy S4 for $200 and that it costs the TELUS $700. That means their subsidy is $500. TELUS would have $500/36months = $13.89 a month over your 3 year contract to make their subsidy back. Now with 24 months they need $20.83 a month to make their subsidy back which is $6.94 more. So, are plans going up by $6.94 a month?

    Let's assume you want a HTC One with unlimited nationwide talk and text with 2GB of data. Right now TELUS has a promotional plan called 'Unlimited Talk & Text -2GB Share'. It's $70 a month on a 3 year.

    With the new SharePlus plan, that would cost you $55 (voice) + $45 (data) = $100. Ouch. That's an extra $30 a month which is much higher than the $6.94 a month subsidy they were giving before.

    The advantage of the new plans are that you can add a couple of phones and share the data but to be honest, the data is so expensive I don't advise anyone to get them. Heck, if you want more data it gets very expensive very quickly. 6GB for $100!

    I'm sure many users will be thumping their 6GB/$30 plan and rightfully so.

    Now let's try to see this from TELUS' standpoint. Assuming most users don't cancel or change plans (which most don't). They were guaranteed 36 months x $70 = $2520 - $500 subsidy = $2020 over the life of the contract or $56.11 a month.

    Now, they're guaranteed 24 months x $100 - $500 subsidy = $1900 over 24 months or $79.17 a month. An increase of 41%! This is probably as bad as it's going to get.

    To me their 2 year plans are initial offerings. They're meant to do two things: 1) get customers to run out and sign 3 year contracts before they're no longer available 2) Take advantage of users who have been itching for 2 year contracts (and failed math).

    TELUS is putting their initial offerings in and waiting to see what Rogers and Bell do.

    The new plans launch on July 30th. ...
    by Published on 06-13-2013 06:06 PM
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    With Fatherís day just around the corner you might be thinking of getting him a new phone but arenít sure which one you get. Donít worry, Iím here to help with my top 5 picks for fatherís day.
    ...
    by Published on 06-10-2013 10:46 PM
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    Apple just announced iOS 7 today. It's for iPhone 4, iPad 2, iPod Touch 4 and iPad Mini or newer. Sorry 3Gs and iPad 1 users. Here are my first impressions of iOS 7 on my iPhone 5:

    The new look is a big pretty change but overall they've done a good job with it. So far with regards to the user interface it all feels pretty polished.

    Apple has replaced the signal bars with dots (or are they nipples). Anyways, I don't like it but I guess I've already gotten used to it. Maybe it's time to update the HoFo logo with those idiotic dots:

    "AT&T: More dots in more places"

    "I have full dots of reception" ...
    by Published on 03-14-2013 01:30 PM
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    Today Samsung is having their Samsung Mobile Unpacked event tonight at 7PM. They're going to have a stream of the event here.

    They're expected to announce the Galaxy S IV. There are lots of rumors surrounding the device including a 4.99" 1920x1080 (because 5" is too big), a crazy 8 core processor which is actually has 4 fast cores and 4 slow, low-power cores, 2GB RAM, probably 16 or 32 or even maybe 64GB of RAM.

    Specs are great but they're only part of the story. Anyone can release a phone with awesome specs. Great hardware needs compelling software in order to connect with consumers.

    Starting with the original Galaxy S Samsung became a leader in Android with each new version grabbing more market share Let's look back at what made each one great.

    Galaxy S:

    Back when the Galaxy S came out Samsung wasn't the leader in Android it is today. HTC had the first notable Android devices like the Dream (T-Mo G1) and Magic. They were also the first to release an overlay for Android which was very raw back then.

    The Galaxy S had a 4" 800x480 display which used Samsung's Super AMOLED technology. OLED displays had been around for a year or 2 before the S launched but this one had higher resolution and deeper blacks which really made it pop. The rest of the specs were similar to other high end phones at the time. 1Ghz processor, 512MB RAM, 16GB RAM and a 5 Megapixel camera (but no flash unlike most other phones).

    On the software side, Samsung included their TouchWiz custom overlay and Social Hub. It launched with Android 2.1 and received 2.2 and 2.3 from Samsung.

    When the Galaxy S came out it was kind of infamous because both the design and software were very similar to the iPhone. It's notable competitors included the Apple iPhone 3Gs (came out before), iPhone 4 (came out after), Google Nexus One (before), HTC Desire (before), Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 (before) and Blackberry 9700 (before).

    Galaxy S II:

    By now, Samsung was really beginning to set themselves apart from other Android OEM's. The GS2 kept the original S' resolution but now the screen measured 4.3" and had a less grainy non-PenTILE Super AMOLED PLUS display. Other hardware was beefed up including a dual-core 1.2Ghz processor, RAM was doubled to 2GB the camera now captured 8MP along with a flash and 1080P video recording. Later versions added LTE and or NFC and or bigger displays with bigger batteries.

    On the software side, Samsung added a newer version of TouchWiz which took the Hub idea further and added a Reader, Music and Gamer Hubs. Samsung shipped it with Android 2.3 and it is currently on Android 4.1.

    Competitors included the Apple iPhone 4 (before), Apple iPhone 4s (after), Galaxy Nexus (after), HTC Raider/Vivid (after), HTC Sensation (about the same time), HTC Amaze (after), Motorola RAZR and the Blackberry Torch.

    The Galaxy S II also formed the basis for the original Samsung Note.

    Most of the Galaxy S II line was the focus of Apple's lawsuit against Samsung.

    Galaxy S III:

    Now Samsung is firmly in the driver seat. Not only are they the defacto leader in Android but they are also duking it out with Apple. Again hardware was beefed up. Some versions came with a quad-core processor while others had a dual-core which featured more efficient processor cores. RAM on some versions was upped to 2GB, with some getting LTE. The battery got a big boost, weighing in at 2300mAh

    The display now has 2.5x the resolution going from 800x480 to 1280x720 and measures 4.8". Samsung is back to using a PenTILE matrix display but the resolution is so high it's almost a moot point.

    Design wise the Galaxy S III has a much more organic shape compared with previous versions which while attractive, weren't particularly interesting looking.

    Somewhere between GS2 and GS3 Google finally got their act together and started offering stuff in Android Play so software-wise Samsung put less emphasis on their hubs. Instead, the latest version of TouchWiz has more usability focused improvements like using the front-facing camera to check if you're looking at the screen before it turns it off.

    Competitors include the Apple iPhone 4s (before), iPhone 5 (after), Galaxy Nexus (before), HTC One X (slightly before), HTC One X+ (after), LG Optimus G (after), Sony Xperia T (after) and Motorola RAZR HD LTE (after).

    The Galaxy S III is going to be tough act to follow. Samsung is really going to have to dig deep to find new features to grab consumer's attention. That said, they've built up enough of a brand that even if the GSIV is a dud, people will still flock to buy it. ...
    by Published on 01-29-2013 09:17 AM
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    I was thinking about the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S4 when I decided to throw together a 2013 Hardware guide. While some of 2013ís Android flagships have already been announced I thought it would be fun to discuss upcoming features plus make a wish list for them. Anyone have any features they'd like to see on the upcoming offerings from Samsung, LG, Motorola?

    Like all phones, they all have to play the hardware game, so spec-wise, theyíre all going to be similar.

    So far phones like the Huawei D2, Sony Xperia Z, etc have:


    • 5" 1920x1080
    • water resistance
    • quad-core processors
    • 2GB RAM
    • 2500-3000mAh batteries
    • 13MP camera


    To me, the most important new features will be the bigger batteries and water resistance. The Note II has a 3000mAh+ battery which makes it one of the only 'full day' phones I've tried.

    As for water resistance you no longer to worry about using your phone in the rain. You can send Tweets from the shower (Taking a shower! #clean #dropped the soap), post Facebook status updates (Howard is cleaning his junk), take pictures underwater when you're on vacation. Need I say more? ...
    by Published on 12-30-2012 04:08 PM
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    With another year almost past I thought Iíd reflect on what has been in the mobile industry.

    iOS:

    On the iOS front what stuck out was how Apple began diversifying their iPad lineup. At the beginning of the year we just had the iPad 2. A few months in we got the 3rd generation iPad with quadruple the resolution which was surprisingly replaced just a few months later with a 4th generation model which has the same resolution as the 3rd gen but with a faster processor.

    More importantly, Apple released the iPad Mini. Basically itís an iPad 2 in a smaller package with a better camera and a lower price tag. While Apple really had a chance to strike at Android with the iPad Mini they basically maintained the status quo with the Miniís $329 price tag.

    Regardless, thereís still room for a ton of competition in the tablet market. ...
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