• Carriers

    by Published on 08-12-2015 07:15 AM
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    iPhone in Canada reported this past Monday that both Fido and Koodo have launched two new BYOD plans: $43/month for 1 GB of data and $53 for 2 GB. The catch? It's only available to residents of Québec.

    Could this anomaly be due to the presence of a strong and independent regional carrier there? Looks like... Both of these price points undercut similar plans from Vidéotron by exactly $5.

    A monthly data bucket of 2 GB is, in my opinion, barely sufficient for the modern smartphone user—but my rough calculations would estimate it to be about two times better than the 1 GB you'd get from these carriers for the same price in Ontario or BC.

    You'll still get the best data deals in Manitoba and Sasketchewan (and if you don't live there do yourself a favour and click here), as that region has strong competition from not one but two independent carriers. Funny how this country's wireless racket works.

    And by "funny" of course I mean infuriating. ಠ_ಠ ...
    by Published on 08-11-2015 10:18 AM
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    One minor revelation from yesterday's pow-wow that Howard and I had with Motorola Canada is still sticking with me: the 3rd iteration of the cheap and cheerful Moto G will only be available from carriers here.

    As a champion of unlocked phones, that makes me sad.

    I can only guess that selling phones to carriers in this country is a better business than offering them SIM-free through other channels like Staples or Ingram Micro. Either that, or nobody's buying the SIM-free versions. And I suspect it's the latter. ...
    by Published on 07-09-2015 09:44 AM
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    Roaming in the EU after June 15,2015

    Having lived in Europe, I was there when my country joined the EU. It was an opportunity to be part of something greater. A dream, an ideal of a United Europe. In its very humble beginnings, A united Europe was to prevent another World War, to bring together the European countries so we would not see anything like we did with Nazi Germany.

    The dream, the ideal then became that of an economic power that could rival the US.

    For this to happen, European countries would have to harmonize and so a common currency was created. And after that, people from each country could move easily between countries with only an ID card. No passports.
    ...
    by Published on 07-08-2015 06:45 AM
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    So there's a $48 plan now...?

    Yesterday saw two features of note in the wider Canadian tech press about Koodo's SK/MB plans—in particular an enterprising user on Kijiji who's offering to set up such a plan for an additional hundred bucks. Peter Nowak supposedly broke the story about these "black market plans"... except that forums user potterworld beat him to it by more than a week. Yay, us!

    iPhone in Canada's Gary Ng did a me-too post, paying lip service to the Kijiji ad but also letting his readers know about the savvy customers who are taking advantage of these plans without any middlemen:

    What ‘Tony’ is offering is not exactly new, especially if you frequent sites such as Howard Forums or RedFlagDeals.
    You're damn right! ...
    by Published on 06-30-2015 07:15 AM
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    Not mine, obviously—Google's first MVNO venture isn't coming to Canada anytime soon.

    Pennsylvanian journalist and blogger Paul Kuehnel was among the first to sign up for Project Fi back in April, and has reported on the service after using it for about three weeks. I found his post via r/Android on reddit.

    A quick refresher: The Project Fi network uses Sprint, T-Mobile and WiFi hotspots, with seamless handoffs between each. The customer is billed a flat rate of $20/month for unlimited calls and SMS plus $10/GB for data. Unused data from each $10 increment is refunded.

    Today I'll share a few highlights from Paul's post, along with a link so you can read it for yourself. ...
    by Published on 06-25-2015 07:18 AM
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    It's official: with the fastest speeds and the best coverage overall, Verizon is the USA's fastest mobile network—this according to a new report by PCMag.

    The bold proclamation comes after more than 100,000 test cycles across 30 cities. Each test cycle measured network latency, multi-threaded uploads and downloads and a separate 1MB web page rendering with 70 unique elements, all recorded to an Excel spreadsheet.

    If you're not a Verizon customer, consider that the results by city will probably prove more instructive for choosing a carrier (or switching). I'm not going to re-blog the entire 40 page report, but I'll do you a solid and give you the winners in each of the 30 tested cities. ...
    by Published on 06-23-2015 07:15 AM
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    Ah yes, mobile payment systems in Canada... One of those not-so-subtle reminders that Canadians are living in a digital backwater, controlled by an oligopoly whose only interest is serving themselves.

    Witness this latest development, just published in The Globe and Mail, detailing how Bell and TELUS have turned their backs on the tap-and-pay system from Apple and have thrown their support behind Rogers' suretap instead.

    CIBC, currently the only bank that supports suretap, is playing this low-key, saying it only wants to give wireless users in this country another option when it comes to mobile payments. But a spokes-shill from suretap is singing a different tune:

    “We are certainly going to beat Apple.”
    Yes, they actually said that. ...
    by Published on 06-18-2015 06:48 AM
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    Yesterday morning, with much fanfare and in the presence of Toronto Mayor John Tory, it was announced that WIND Mobile—and only WIND Mobile—was bringing cellular service to Toronto's underground transport system.

    The service has already been lit up at Bay, St. George and Yonge/Bloor, with the entire downtown loop set to come online within the month. You'll get a signal on subway platforms, though, because service in the underground tunnels is, at present, cost-prohibitive and too useful for riders.

    It was a major PR victory for WIND; its CEO was not only crowing about the carrier's one-year exclusive, but had the chutzpah to say that the Big Three were welcome to negotiate a TTC roaming deal during that exclusive. But I'm going to call this thing out for what it is—a net neutrality disaster, or whatever you'd call the wireless equivalent.

    What would the reaction have been were it Bell, Rogers or TELUS who announced exclusive dibs on Toronto subway platforms? ...
    by Published on 06-03-2015 06:58 AM
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    Okay, so the photo here may be overstating things just a bit, but it's still an auspicious day for mobile phone users (aka everyone) in Canada.

    If you're one of the 2.2 to 4 million customers on Bell, Rogers or TELUS (or their subsidiaries) who is 24 months or more into a 3 year contract, today is the day you can walk away without penalty, all thanks to the CRTC's Wireless Code.

    But wait, there's more! ...
    by Published on 05-27-2015 07:15 AM
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    I came across an interesting read by Canadian tech journalist Peter Nowak—he made my first (and thus far only) list of mobile heroes back in 2013. This week he's posted almost 3,000 words on his experience switching to WIND Mobile from a Big Three carrier.

    The timing of his piece is interesting, given the approaching June 3rd deadline that will effectively end three-year wireless contracts in Canada; both the Big Three and their subsidiaries are offering "deals" not seen in this country for quite some time. I put "deals" in quotation marks because, for anyone willing to jump through a few hoops to get Koodo's $55/5GB SK/MB plan, they aren't really deals at all.

    Given Peter's fantastic coverage of the Fair for Canada debacle—when the Big Three showed their true colours in the face of some real (if ultimately only rumoured) competition—I was expecting to see some politics behind in his switch to WIND. Instead, it seems like it's all about the money, and what you get for it. ...
    by Published on 05-20-2015 04:44 PM
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    It seems that a Telus launch of something similar to Rogers Roam Like Home might be imminent. That or at least a much better US roaming offer, something to compete with Rogers.

    In mid-April Telus filed trademarks for the terms "Easy Roam" / "Voyagez Connecté" as well as "Roam Ready" / "Prêt pour l'itinérance"

    For a brief period last week on the Telus Mobility roaming and travel webpage there was a clickable heading (as seen in the attached screen capture) called US Easy Roam, which linked to a "page not found" when clicked. ...
    by Published on 05-15-2015 07:20 AM
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    ... Apparently not a prepaid plan at all.

    This is an oddly-specific thing to shop for, I know. But in case someone reading this is in the market for something similar, I've already done the research for you. A buddy's daughter is getting her first-ever smartphone for her 13th birthday, a hand-me-down from yours truly. So yesterday her dad and I took to the lower-level carrier kiosks of Toronto's Eaton Centre in search of a suitable provider and plan.

    The kid's requirements are as follows: no data (WiFi only), and as much calling and texting as we can get, for as little per month as possible. If we were purchasing a phone and a plan this would be a no-brainer—we'd pick up an unlocked Moto G or Moto E at Staples and immediately proceed to WIND Mobile, to activate it on their $25 Talk and Text Plan. The vast majority of this new teenager's communication with her friends will likely be via SMS, WhatsApp or whatever it is kids use these days; voice calls will mostly come from fretful parents wondering where she is.

    But alas, there's a complication: the phone that she's getting is the made-for-Rogers first-gen LTE Moto G, which I took home from a Moto event this time last year. It's unlocked (for some reason) but unfortunately doesn't support AWS. Yes, it's overkill for a teenager who isn't going to use LTE but hey, it's also a free phone. ...
    by Published on 05-14-2015 07:35 AM
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    And I couldn't be more proud. Or more grateful for Koodo's $55 SK/MB plan.

    Ordinarily she wouldn't go anywhere near the generous (for these days) 5 GB ceiling of the plan we're both on, but a perfect storm of two elements—a sudden obsession with a YouTube channel and a finicky WiFi radio on her OnePlus One—made for an exception.

    The final tally for the damage was 704.52 MB (our new billing cycle starts today); for this she'll be dinged a mere $10 on our next bill—a lot less than the Big Three's current overage rates, I might add. More importantly, that 5 GB data bucket kept her overage low in the first place.

    It got me thinking more about streaming video on smartphones. It seems to me there's a real disconnect between all the wondrous services available and the cold, hard cost of mobile data. Our home broadband connection has a monthly data bucket of 300 GB; streaming many hours of Netflix is no problem for us. But YouTube, along with the likes of these new streaming apps like Periscope and Meerkat, can easily gobble up much more data than what's available in a typical smartphone plan. ...
    by Published on 05-07-2015 07:33 AM
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    The very first post that I wrote for the front page of Howard Forums was about Ting, a Toronto-based Mobile Virtual Network Operator (MVNO) that offers wholesale wireless service from Sprint to its customers in the USA, but was (and is) unable to do anything similar for its home base in Canada.

    MVNOs seem to be very popular with American forum members. There are Canadian MVNOs, too—PC Mobile, Petro Canada Mobility and SpeakOut Wireless are the notable examples I can think of off the top of my head. I myself have only had first-hand experience with SpeakOut; in my opinion it's best suited for emergencies or occasional use.

    And the MVNO situation in this country isn't going to get any better, even after the CRTC's announcement this week that it will regulate domestic roaming rates—this according to Dr. Michael Geist, whose recent post on this subject merits a closer look. ...
    by Published on 05-05-2015 07:10 AM
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    According to iPhone in Canada, select Rogers and Fido customers are being targeted with a free data offer to keep them from jumping ship to another carrier. This initiative is a direct result of the Wireless Code.

    For anyone reading this on the front page, some Rogers and Fido subscribers have received text messages with an offer of 1GB/month free, for a maximum of 12 months. The Rogers text looks like this:

    Rogers info: Fantastic News! We've added 1GB/mo. of extra data on your wireless [xxx-xxx-xxxx] at no extra cost. Thank you for being our loyal customer. Enjoy this gift effective [start of billing cycle?] valid only on your current plan until your next device upgrade for a maximum of 12 months. (non-transferrable)
    And the Fido one like this:

    Hi, it’s Fido: Thanks for being with us! Here’s an extra 1GB of data per month just for you at no extra cost for [xxx-xxx-xxxx]. It’ll start on [end of billing cycle?], so enjoy it as long as you have your current plan or until you upgrade your phone, for up to 12 months. Reach us at [Fido bit.ly link for contacts page].
    ...
    by Published on 04-22-2015 07:10 AM
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    Last night The Wall Street Journal sent tech blogs into a frenzy as it reported that Google's "Nova" project, an endeavour that would add "MVNO" to the company's extensive résumé, was on the cusp of being launched—possibly as early as today.

    Most of WSJ's content sits behind a paywall, but for some reason this particular bombshell does not. Copy/paste, anyone? ...
    by Published on 03-27-2015 07:25 AM
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    If you live in Canada and aren't happy with either your mobile service or what you're paying for it, my advice is this: Get yourself on Koodo's $55/5GB SK/MB plan as per ijcy's instructions before it's too late.

    The likes of Mobile Syrup would have you believe that the coming changes to Koodo (and also Fido) amount to a re-branding for millennials, but forum members know better—the real news here is that loyalty programs and perks are going away.

    If reports (from multiple sources) turn out to be true, then subscribers to the Fido network will soon see their Fido Dollars disappear. The 4% pre-tax credit on a customer's monthly bill could be used towards a new device or applied as a discount to an add-on. It was a good differentiator for what was otherwise essentially wireless service from Rogers.

    The changes coming to Koodo are two-fold. First, the Koodo Tab, a surprisingly reasonable alternative to the traditional (and egregious) penalties of early contract cancellation, will soon be off the table. Even worse, the 10% BYOD discount will likewise be no more. As someone who refuses, on principle, to lock themselves in to any one carrier via a subsidy, that 10% makes Koodo's $55 plan an even better $49.50/month. To get something similar from parent company TELUS would cost at least twice as much. ...
    by Published on 02-27-2015 08:11 AM
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    Yesterday the FCC voted 3-2 in favour of Title II-based net neutrality rules, a decision which has implications for mobile users, members accessing these forums via their home broadband connection... Internet users in general, really, and far beyond the confines of the USA. I've been pouring through the news on this since the vote came down yesterday, and thought I'd share some of the more interesting bits here.

    What's Title II Again?

    Title II is about the idea of common carriage, first applied to telephone networks in the FCC's Communications Act of 1934, and overhauled with the Telecommunications Act of 1996. The idea is pretty simple: a network provider must treat everything on their network equally. The best non-Internet example that I can think of is the explosion of long distance providers here in Canada during the 1990s. And the Internet? Well, you've probably seen this fake ISP ad before.

    Verizon's Cheeky Response

    As expected, Internet providers in the United States weren't exactly thrilled with the news. Verizon went so far as to post their official response in Morse code... because common carriage is such an antiquated notion, amirite? Anyone? ...
    by Published on 02-26-2015 07:10 AM
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    Android users seething over Apple's sudden success with Apple Pay might get some good news this spring: If the tip received by Ars Technica turns out to be true, an upgraded tap-and-pay solution called Android Pay will be announced at this year's Google I/O developer conference.

    The big innovation that Android Pay will bring to the current Google Wallet is an API enabling the user to access Wallet from within any app that supports it. For example, if you were redeeming a coupon from the 7-Eleven app you could pay for the entire purchase with Google Wallet, without leaving the 7-Eleven app.

    Android Pay has been partly made possible by Google's recent acquisition of SoftCard, a failed mobile payment system created by a partnership of US carriers. And no doubt some of it has to do with the looming spectre of Apple Pay, even though some Android users—at least in the USA—have been able to tap and pay with Google Wallet for years. An added bonus of the SoftCard deal is that Wallet/Android Pay may see a wider release on carrier-branded phones. ...
    by Published on 02-17-2015 07:25 AM
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    Now that I live in Winnipeg (not really) it's time to give some major props to forums member and fellow Manitoban (winky face) Ben Klass. I'm waaayyy behind the curve on this, but better late than never, right?

    Back in November of 2013 I posted about Ben's 26-page complaint to the CRTC, making a fairly compelling argument that Bell's mobile TV service was in violation of Canada's Telecommunications Act. To wit:

    Bell charges you $5 a month to watch 5GB worth of their own content. If you want to watch 5GB worth of Netflix on the Bell network, on the other hand, they charge you $40. That’s a markup of 800%.
    In other words, this is very much a net neutrality issue, similar to T-Mobile USA's Music Freedom but actually worse—unlike T-Mobile, Bell has been giving its mobile network undue preference to its own content. ...
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