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Thread: Study Reveals Canadian Wireless Prices Lowest in North America

  1. #1
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    Study Reveals Canadian Wireless Prices Lowest in North America

    The CWTA = Mouthpiece for the Carriers has spoken.
    Time for all of us to stop thinking for ourselves
    I guess free national calling in the US is not important.
    Huge minute

    Sprint

    450 minutes $39.99
    Unlimited Nights & Weekends starting at 7pm!
    Domestic long distance
    Unlimited Sprint Mobile to Mobile

    You may terminate any line of service before its Term ends by calling us, however you will be responsible for an EARLY TERMINATION FEE of up to $200 (“Fee”) for each line/number terminated early


    I would LOVE to see this plan in Canada.
    But I guess we have it better here.


    Study Reveals Canadian Wireless Prices Lowest in North America

    Customers benefit from competitive rates on world stage


    OTTAWA - July 12, 2007 - The Canadian Wireless Telecommunications
    Association (CWTA) welcomes a new comprehensive report by the Organization
    for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that found mobile phone
    customers in Canada enjoy some of the most competitive wireless prices among
    the 30 member countries of the OECD. According to the OECD's recently
    published biennial Communications Outlook 2007, Canadian customers fare
    significantly better than their neighbours in the US and Mexico in almost
    all usage categories.

    "This report, as well as other recent studies, offers even further evidence
    that true competition in the wireless industry is providing Canadian
    customers with excellent value compared to customers in other countries,"
    said CWTA President & CEO Peter Barnes. "The new OECD data should also put
    to rest the distorted information about the true state of wireless pricing
    in Canada put forth by companies seeking entry into the wireless marketplace
    through taxpayer-subsidies and other uncompetitive measures."

    CWTA also notes the OECD report shows that wireless prices in Canada compare
    very favourably with many of the European countries included in the study.
    Customers in Canada continue to enjoy prices that are below or close to the
    average wireless prices across the 30 countries studied.

    The OECD study is the third report in recent weeks that confirms the
    affordability of wireless prices in Canada. The Q1/07 Global Wireless Matrix
    from Merrill Lynch once again positions Canada as the country with the
    second lowest wireless revenue per minute among the G7 nations. As well, a
    recent inter-country comparison of mobile wireless prices by Analysys
    Consulting found Canadian wireless subscribers fare significantly better
    than their US counterparts for all except the high usage basket. The study
    found that when looking at low usage, medium usage and family-plan baskets -
    representing the majority of Canadians - Canadians do far better than
    Americans.

    "Canadian customers have always benefited from the intensely competitive
    nature of this country's wireless industry," Mr. Barnes noted. "It is that
    spirit of competition and entrepreneurship that is responsible for the 43
    per cent drop in wireless prices over the last five years."

    More information about Canada's competitive wireless industry can be found
    at: http://www.wirelesscompetition.ca.


    About CWTA
    CWTA is the authority on wireless issues, developments and trends in Canada.
    It represents cellular, PCS, messaging, mobile radio, fixed wireless and
    mobile satellite carriers as well as companies that develop and produce
    products and services for the industry. (www.cwta.ca)

    Media Information:
    Marc Choma
    [email protected]
    613-233-4888 ext. 207

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by chaarger
    "Canadian customers have always benefited from the intensely competitive
    nature of this country's wireless industry," Mr. Barnes noted. "It is that
    spirit of competition and entrepreneurship that is responsible for the 43
    per cent drop in wireless prices over the last five years."
    Uhm... Just what exactly has dropped by 43%?

    All we've been seeing quarter after quarter are increases in the prices of features which in themselves have not advanced at all. I'm sure the technology behind Call Display is the same today as it was a decade ago, yet it's increased by how much?

    Let me guess, because Demand has increased due to the number of subscribers, it increases the price? Oh wait, Supply is infinite so how does that graph work? Data has also gone from Unlimited to 250M. I think someone might have forgotten to carry the 1.

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    Trying to find some numbers to see what they are basing thier 'facts' on. Looks like it has something to do with us being charged 12 cents a minute for a call on average. I guess they don't take into account unlimited plans or how much some of us get ripped if we spend a lot of time on the phone.

    My dad's phone bill is about 350 a month and that is no data plan at all. All talk

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    Virgin Mobile US
    18¢ each minute, all the time
    10¢ per minute for us$6.99/month

    Virgin Mobile Canada

    10¢ per minute for cdn$10/month

    Canada has no per minute
    (when we did it was 25¢ per minute)

    Per minute comparison
    So 25-(18x12%)= 5¢ more in Canada or 25% more than in US for per minute

    10¢ plan comparison

    cdn$10-(us$7x12%)= $1.16 more in Canada = 27% more in Canada than in US
    but cdn10¢ is 12% cheaper than us10¢

    So over all Virgin users in US spend about 25% less than we do!

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    T-Mobile in US

    MyFaves 300 = us$39.99

    Whenever minutes 300 per month
    Weekend minutes Unlimited
    Weeknight minutes Unlimited
    myFaves minutes Unlimited

    All our national voice plans include:

    * No nationwide long-distance or roaming charges
    * Nationwide Whenever Minutes®

    Call your favorite people – regardless of which carrier they use. This plan gives you unlimited any-network calls to the five numbers you call most, as well as 300 Whenever Minutes® with free domestic long distance and no digital roaming charges anywhere across the US for all other calls. You even get unlimited night and weekend calls.


    In Canada

    Rogers MY5
    : (5PM-7AM) Unlimited Eve & Wknd & 100+50 Wkday Minutes + MY5 (unlimited local calling and text) cdn $44 = us$40


    Seems to me that the Americans get a LOT more value than we do

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    I think the CWTA is the biggest joke....

    Here's some "myths and facts" they recently published in a huge ad in the Globe and Mail.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Myth #1 – Canada’s wireless industry is not competitive.

    Fact – There are more than two dozen (24) wireless service providers operating in Canada today, more than at any other time.

    Myth #2 – Canadians feel there is not enough competition in the wireless industry.

    Fact – In a 2007 survey by the Strategic Counsel, 82 per cent of people said there are “enough” or “more than enough” choices in wireless service providers in Canada.

    Myth #3 – Canadians pay too much for wireless service relative to other countries.

    Fact – At an average of 12 cents per minute, Canada has the second lowest rates for use of wireless technology among the G7 nations.

    Myth #4 – Many Canadians do not have wireless coverage.

    Fact – Today, 98 per cent of Canadians have wireless coverage.

    Myth #5 – Canada does not currently have any third generation (3G) wireless networks.

    Fact – Today, 3G networks allow Canadians to use mobile phones and other wireless devices to watch live TV, download movies and music, surf the Internet, play video games, send instant messages, share photos and connect to mobile computers.

    Myth #6 – Canada lags other countries in the adoption of wireless technology.

    Fact – There are more than a million new wireless subscribers in Canada each year. Industry analysts forecast that wireless phone subscriptions will surpass land line subscriptions by the end of 2007.

    Myth #7 – Canada’s wireless industry is not a world leader when it comes to innovation.

    Fact – Canada has achieved a number of breakthroughs in the global wireless industry, including creating the BlackBerry® mobile device and facilitating the first text message between customers of different networks.

    Myth #8 – Canada’s wireless industry does not contribute significantly to the economy.

    Fact – Canada’s wireless industry spends hundreds of millions of dollars a year on infrastructure, equipment, research and development, and employs over 25,000 Canadians in highly skilled jobs. In addition to the $1.5 billion in license fees that the federal government collected from the last spectrum auction in 2001, the wireless industry pays Ottawa more than $150 million a year in wireless licensing fees.

    Myth #9 – Federal regulators feel Canada’s wireless industry is not competitive.

    Fact – The competitiveness of Canada’s wireless industry has been confirmed by the federal Competition Bureau. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has also confirmed that the wireless market is competitive.

    Myth #10 – Industry Minister Maxime Bernier supports new wireless regulations.

    Fact – Minister Bernier has called for deregulation in the telecommunications sector, stating: “Excessive regulation always has a cost.” His recently announced spectrum policy framework provides concise and clear guidelines, starting with, “Market forces should be relied on to the maximum extent feasible,” and, "Regulatory measures, when required, should be minimally intrusive."

    Myth #11 – It doesn’t matter to taxpayers how the 2008 Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) spectrum auction is conducted.

    Fact – The 2001 spectrum auction generated $1.5 billion in license fees, all of which was applied to the federal debt. Revenues from the 2008 spectrum auction are forecast to be at least $1 billion. But setting aside spectrum and other artificial measures could cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars in lost revenue.

    Myth #12 – In the past, cellular companies received spectrum for free.

    Fact – Wireless companies have always had to apply for spectrum in a competitive process and pay for the spectrum they received. Protected monopolies have never existed in the wireless sector. Companies had to invest heavily in the early days of wireless to meet the conditions of the licenses that were imposed on them, and to address competitive challenges.

    Myth #13 – Existing wireless companies do not want competition.

    Fact – Wireless companies have always operated in a competitive environment. It is vigorous competition that has spurred the investments and innovations that Canadian consumers benefit from. But all companies in the AWS spectrum auction must compete on a level playing field. Market forces must be maintained if the industry is to continue serving Canadians.

    Myth #14 – Companies such as Quebecor cannot enter the wireless market without corporate subsidies.

    Fact – Companies looking to enter the wireless market include some of Canada’s largest cable concerns. Quebecor, and others, are well-financed and have easy access to capital. Governments should not subsidize corporations at taxpayers’ expense.

    Myth #15 – Holding a spectrum auction is not fair.

    Fact – An open and transparent auction is the most equitable way to distribute Advanced Wireless Services spectrum among Canadian wireless companies. Imposing measures such as set-asides and other subsidies create artificial barriers to real competition and do not help customers.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hmmm.... I think I'm paying Telus too much for my cellular service. Good thing I have another 24 companies to choose from that may be cheaper

    -mike

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    Haha yeah, that's a bunch of BIASED bull
    Last edited by Moderator HF 7; 07-17-2007 at 05:47 PM.

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    Even NEWER study reveals that the CWTA is convoluted and incapable of logical thought

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperCM
    Uhm... Just what exactly has dropped by 43%?

    All we've been seeing quarter after quarter are increases in the prices of features which in themselves have not advanced at all. I'm sure the technology behind Call Display is the same today as it was a decade ago, yet it's increased by how much?

    Let me guess, because Demand has increased due to the number of subscribers, it increases the price? Oh wait, Supply is infinite so how does that graph work? Data has also gone from Unlimited to 250M. I think someone might have forgotten to carry the 1.
    A few points:

    SuperCM is entirely correct in saying that the pricing on features that haven't changed at all over the years, like CID, makes absolutely no sense since there is an infinite supply and it doesn't cost the carriers anymore to offer the feature now than it did 2 years ago.

    Entrepreneurship my ***. Going with regressive data pricing is a step forward?! I see, it makes perfect sense, charge more for a lesser product. Even offering 1 or 2 GB of data for a REASONABLE price would be welcomed (say 2 GB for $60). But no, they instead go with. "Sweet *** plan, 4 MB for email, chat, streaming media, web surfing, google maps, telenav blah blah...and it gets better, you get to pay us $12/MB in overage charges which you'll no doubt incur because of all the great reasons we gave you to get a data phone in the first place." Yes, definitely innovative-this-will-increase-data-usage-numbers type thinking. Honestly, I love what my Q is capable of doing, but even just doing basic stuff I find 10 MB a month is not at all sufficient. As many others can attest to. The way the pricing works, it's like if you bought a plasma TV but only had basic cable because the pricing for digital cable packages were sky high and thus you could not reap the benefits of the tv's functionality. It wouldn't make any sense.

    As for Canadians getting great deals on "low and medium" usage levels, better than the US, maybe it's true for prepaid but otherwise I contest that notion completely. Sprint, as an example has their lowest level plan at $29.99 US net of taxes for 200 anytime and 9 pm Unlt N/W with CId and Vmail. Canadian carrier lowest is $20 base (no extra features in most cases) and then SAF/E911 ranging from a total of $27.45 to 29.45 CAD net of taxes.

    Medium level plans, with minute bundles ranging from 350-500 go for between $30-$50 CAD base price, again, usually no extra features, plus the SAF/E911. The earlier referenced Sprint Power Pack plan for $39.99 US falls right in the middle and includes CID, Vmail, national M2M, no domestic LD.

    A clear advantage Canadians have is that incoming texts are always free, where as in the US, you are charged for incoming texts. But that is pretty much all I see. So I find this research to be completely out of sync with the reality of the state of the industry and the CWTA attempting to sugar coat everything to make it seem as if all were just peachy keen. Well, it's not. Look at the media attention it's getting, the Telecom Summit this year garnered much attention, it's in the news, analysts are blogging about it, newspapers have articles and the CWTA will do anything to spin it the other way. Hell, Telus at one point (during the possible buyout of Bell) said it recognized that another carrier would be needed should they swallow up Bell. Gee, funny how suddenly they supported this measure since they were getting something out of it (landline and CDMA monopoly, then they'd know how Rogers felt). It's a problem and it is now getting the attention it deserves.

    Additonally, those "myths" make me wanna ralph.

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    Fox News would blush if they produced that,

    Virgin Mobile India Graphic

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    I Googled the OECD and the the Q1/07 Global Wireless Matrix
    from Merrill Lynch to get the original data but sadly I can't find it anywhere. Has anyone else been able to find the source reports?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikew44
    Myth #6 – Canada lags other countries in the adoption of wireless technology.

    Fact – There are more than a million new wireless subscribers in Canada each year. Industry analysts forecast that wireless phone subscriptions will surpass land line subscriptions by the end of 2007.
    Interesting how they "duck and evade" the question by not answering the question and talking about something tangentially related. Some European countries have more than 100% penetration. Well not every person has a cellphone but some have more than one phone. We in Canada ate at less than 65%. So I would say that we do definitely lag in adoption of wireless / cellphone technology.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikew44
    Myth #7 – Canada’s wireless industry is not a world leader when it comes to innovation.

    Fact – Canada has achieved a number of breakthroughs in the global wireless industry, including creating the BlackBerry® mobile device and facilitating the first text message between customers of different networks.
    What does the manufacturing of RIM Blackberry have to do with Wireless Carriers and the services that wireless carriers provide us? They are comparing two separate industries. Consider the fact that Bell launched Blackberry service TWO Years after Rogers launched the service and Telus launched TWO years after Bell. Where is the innovation and leadership there?

    The CWTA is full of crap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperCM
    Uhm... Just what exactly has dropped by 43%?

    All we've been seeing quarter after quarter are increases in the prices of features which in themselves have not advanced at all. I'm sure the technology behind Call Display is the same today as it was a decade ago, yet it's increased by how much?
    i believe what they mean is for what is included in plans now, versus what was includedin plans 5 years ago...if you took what you get now in your plan, compared to 5 years ago, it would cost 43% more than what you are paying...of course the service itself isn't getting any "les expensive", but you are getting more and more in your plan...8 years ago, a $50 plan had 100 minutes...yep, that's it.

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    dirtyjeffer - what is your prediction about how long we in Canada will have to wait to get American style plans? it is clearly apparent that in the quick comparison between Canadian and American plans that Americans get MUCH MORE value for their money.

    It is clear that the CWTA press release is total BS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by connexx
    It is clear that the CWTA press release is total BS.
    Maybe you mean "It is clear that the CWTA press release was written by a bunch of idiots at Bell"

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    the only real provider we had that was innovating ni terms of pricing, new plans etc was Fido...

    CityFido
    CountryFido
    Fido to Fido calls
    IFido
    First with unlimited incoming
    Earlier Evening and Week-ends

    All that was killed by Rogers....

    And it's not true that prices have gone down. Long distance charges, VM CD, Overage, Data transmission, handset prices, international roaming, USA roaming.. all these charges have went up in the past 2-3 years...


    Competitive market???? How come all monthly plans are pretty much exactly the same between the 4 major providers......

    ********!
    Of course I'd like to sit around and chat. Of course I'd like to sit and chew the fat....

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