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Thread: Straight Talk questions...using Net10 phone, and tethering laptop

  1. #16
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    "ST" = Straight Talk
    T-Mobile’s new marketing campaign for Vermont and Western New Hampshire:
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  2. #17
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    If you buy a phone from any company/indavidual "it's yours" period. What you do with it is not Verizon, Sprint or anybody else's business. If a carrier offers a service you can use YOUR phone to access their service if it is compatible and you pay for it. You nerds that talk about TOS and crap like that are the reason why we are losing our rights and freedom every day. Stand up for yourself. Do not let Big Brother and his agents of fear Verizon, Sprint etc. push you around.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstiltner
    If you buy a phone from any company/indavidual "it's yours" period. What you do with it is not Verizon, Sprint or anybody else's business. If a carrier offers a service you can use YOUR phone to access their service if it is compatible and you pay for it. You nerds that talk about TOS and crap like that are the reason why we are losing our rights and freedom every day. Stand up for yourself. Do not let Big Brother and his agents of fear Verizon, Sprint etc. push you around.

    There are no "Rights" or "Freedom" in regard to buying a service from a private company. However the Company has the "Right " to terminate that service if the Customer uses that service in a way that it is not intended to be used.

    Yes the customer owns the phone, but the Company owns the service. Feel free to use that phone as a paper weight.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstiltner
    If you buy a phone from any company/indavidual "it's yours" period. What you do with it is not Verizon, Sprint or anybody else's business. If a carrier offers a service you can use YOUR phone to access their service if it is compatible and you pay for it. You nerds that talk about TOS and crap like that are the reason why we are losing our rights and freedom every day. Stand up for yourself. Do not let Big Brother and his agents of fear Verizon, Sprint etc. push you around.
    I happen to agree with you, but unfortunately US law does not. And, it's not quite so cut and dry as you seem to think.

    For example, it is *illegal* to change the ESN on a CDMA phone, according to US law. I actually have the technical knowledge and skills to do it, but it is currently illegal, so I don't do it.

    And, the TOS (terms of service) are explicit. Even if you could use your own device to access their network, the TOS limits what you can do on their network. After all, the network is *theirs.*

    This is exactly why I use a GSM phone on ATT, for the moment...this kind of crap limits my interest in CDMA phones. And, in my area ATT is king. Verizon is a close second, which makes ST possible, but less desirable for me.

    Nevertheless I'm keeping my eyes open about ST. The pricing is simply irresistible, assuming adequate coverage.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstiltner
    If you buy a phone from any company/indavidual "it's yours" period. What you do with it is not Verizon, Sprint or anybody else's business. If a carrier offers a service you can use YOUR phone to access their service if it is compatible and you pay for it. You nerds that talk about TOS and crap like that are the reason why we are losing our rights and freedom every day. Stand up for yourself. Do not let Big Brother and his agents of fear Verizon, Sprint etc. push you around.
    If you loaned your car to someone, and gave them your terms and conditions for useing it, would you want them to follow your rules or do as they please?

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tracfancier View Post
    If you loaned your car to someone, and gave them your terms and conditions for useing it, would you want them to follow your rules or do as they please?
    Let me add a bit more to this subject: When a car may be loaned, it is expected that the car will come back in sound condition, and that the driver that borrowed the car will obey the owner's rules as well as the proper traffic laws for the area in which they are operating the loaned vehicle.

    Relative to a piece of hardware someone has purchased, however, there is a bit of a difference (unless it's been loaned.) Let's break it down:

    1. Phone is purchased at a store, outright, in cash, with no subsidies; therefore, the purchaser owns the phone, the 'hardware.' There is no argument to this; the purchaser owns the phone.

    2. Although the phone/hardware is owned by the purchaser, purchaser is still subject to the terms of the carrier/service provider, even though the purchaser may own the hardware. Ergo, the 'phone owner' owns the hardware, but if the carrier/service provider owns the towers--or has a service agreement with the carrier (such as StraightTalk does with AT&T) upon which the owner of the phone is going to use their purchased, wholly-owned hardware, the owner of that phone is still subject to the rules of the carrier/service provider.

    3. Straight Talk's agreements with the carrier determine whether or not Straight Talk's customer's may use their handset as a data modem and connect their computer to the phone and use the phone's Internet connection in that particular manner.

    4. Local data transfer, such as images, purchased music you bought over the phone's Internet connection, music you own on cd, tape, or other medium that you transferred to the phone for your own personal use, etc., probably do not fall under the 'tethering' guidelines, and also probably don't break the Terms of Service agreement with Straight Talk.

    5. The Crux: "STRAIGHT TALK UNLIMITED TALK, TEXT AND DATA PLAN FEATURES CANNOT BE USED FOR (1) access to the Internet, intranets, or other data networks except as the device's native applications and capabilities permit, or (2) any applications that tether your device to a laptop or personal computer other than for the use of Wireless Sync."*

    So that's it, folks! No 'tethering' for Intenet-on-Laptop-or-Desktop use. Still, Wireless Sync is okay; this is great for calendar-sync and other such applications. This also probably applies to desktop applications that have a desktop component--say, a checkbook register program--that has wireless sync to the phone. (Seriously, though, with everything being stored 'in the cloud' of late, it's probably not really necessary, anymore.)

    I've enjoyed posting. Thanks for reading.

    Warmest Regards,
    Firefishe

    *Taken from the Straight Talk (www.straighttalk.com) Terms of Service.
    Last edited by Firefishe; 11-22-2010 at 09:57 PM. Reason: Citation Inserted

  7. #22
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    Good discussion in here. Being that the E71 is the first Tracfone / Net10 / ST offering where tethering (at least easily and at a usable speed) is even possible, it will be interesting to see how can monitor and/or enforce that policy. I am not even sure it is possible for them to tell, other than those people who will undoubtly try to replace their home internet connection with it and have data usage off the charts.

  8. #23
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    Firefishe and others bring up some good points. My question is how can AT&T or ST differentiate whether the phone or a tethered laptop is using the internet? My E71 has several browsers that access the internet and I can spend all day on the net with the phone if I wanted. However my eyes are not what they used to be, so what's the big deal (other than that it is against their TOS) to use a laptop to occasionally access the internet? Does the laptop transmit some information back to AT&T that they can identify that one is tethering?

  9. #24
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    ST = Straight Talk (via Walmart)

  10. #25
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    Only 2 phones are worth while tethering on ST, but it IS against ST term of agreements. I know someone who tethered their E71 and ST disabled their data at the end of the month for an almost 16GB worth of usage and wouldn't enable it until they got a lecture about it. They said if it happened again, they would terminate their account without warning.

  11. #26
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    16 GB? Geeze. I tether (not on Straight Talk) and it's my only home Web access. My average monthly usage is around 2 GB.


    Quote Originally Posted by benjamin.kelley View Post
    Only 2 phones are worth while tethering on ST, but it IS against ST term of agreements. I know someone who tethered their E71 and ST disabled their data at the end of the month for an almost 16GB worth of usage and wouldn't enable it until they got a lecture about it. They said if it happened again, they would terminate their account without warning.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by skootch View Post
    Firefishe and others bring up some good points. My question is how can AT&T or ST differentiate whether the phone or a tethered laptop is using the internet? My E71 has several browsers that access the internet and I can spend all day on the net with the phone if I wanted. However my eyes are not what they used to be, so what's the big deal (other than that it is against their TOS) to use a laptop to occasionally access the internet? Does the laptop transmit some information back to AT&T that they can identify that one is tethering?
    Easy. If you are using your phone as a hot spot or other access point for a PC, you will have the PCs MAC address being sent during internet use, and the PC MAC address will not be the same as the phones, which the provider knows. Ergo if the phones MAC address being sent in conjunction with another it is a dead give away, but here are a couple other ways, When any computer accesses the web be it phone, PC, Tablet what ever, normally it is identified by another PC in the network. Which is why you can see in some peoples posts a little bugger that says what your OS, Browser IP address etc are. If the phone is Android, that is a Linux OS, Not sure what browser Android uses. But if you are tethering your phone and your provider sees two OS's being used on your package they know you are doing something.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CatAndCellLover View Post
    16 GB? Geeze. I tether (not on Straight Talk) and it's my only home Web access. My average monthly usage is around 2 GB.
    If that's all that you do, they'll probably never check to see if you are tethering. They probably have more than one way of verifying if you're tethering or not, but one of the best known ways they can track it is by reading what browser is being used. If you are using Internet Explorer or Firefox they would easily be able to determine that you're tethering. As long as your usage of the data doesn't exceed normal usage you may not have much to worry about. People that use their phone's to download copious amounts of data or stream high quality video on a daily basis should be concerned. Most people don't tap their 2GB limit on their AT&T plan with the latest smart phones.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth=L View Post
    If that's all that you do, they'll probably never check to see if you are tethering. They probably have more than one way of verifying if you're tethering or not, but one of the best known ways they can track it is by reading what browser is being used. If you are using Internet Explorer or Firefox they would easily be able to determine that you're tethering. As long as your usage of the data doesn't exceed normal usage you may not have much to worry about. People that use their phone's to download copious amounts of data or stream high quality video on a daily basis should be concerned. Most people don't tap their 2GB limit on their AT&T plan with the latest smart phones.
    How about if you are using Opera on your PC while Opera mini is on the E71?

    Does in make any difference in visibility if you are using a hot spot (Joiku) versus using the E71 as a modem (its inherent functionality) via a usb cable?

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by drooper View Post
    How about if you are using Opera on your PC while Opera mini is on the E71?

    Does in make any difference in visibility if you are using a hot spot (Joiku) versus using the E71 as a modem (its inherent functionality) via a usb cable?
    As the above poster noted, they would also see two MAC addresses. They may also be able to tell the difference between Opera and Opera Mini.

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