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Thread: Are Smart Phones Making Pedestrians Dumb?

  1. #1
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    Are Smart Phones Making Pedestrians Dumb?

    Are Smart Phones Making Pedestrians Dumb?

    NEW YORK (AP) — It was a miserable morning in New York, rain falling heavily and a 30 mph wind that made holding an umbrella difficult. Yet a man walked briskly up Fifth Avenue, balancing his umbrella and dodging pedestrians as he texted from his smart phone.

    As a sheer physical act, it was almost Olympian in the strength, dexterity and concentration required.

    It was also completely ridiculous.

    It was RAINING. And cold. The man was, let's presume, minutes from some destination. At any moment, he could spear a fellow pedestrian with his umbrella because he was only marginally paying attention to where he was going. What message could possibly be so important that it couldn't wait?

    While smart phones and other electronic devices changed popular culture by offering an ability to always stay connected, they have so swiftly turned into such a compelling need that a simple walk down the street is considered wasted time.

    One too many times stepping around a shuffling pedestrian immersed in e-mail led me to conduct a social experiment. I decided to count the number of people I saw distracted by their electronic devices during my 25-minute morning walk to work from New York's Grand Central Station to the far West Side.

    Some ground rules: Cell-phone conversations count, along with texting and looking at the devices. I didn't consider listening to music to be a distraction — that, um, would require counting myself — but people who looked at their iPods while walking made the list. Pulling over to the side to use an electronic device didn't count, because that's what a courteous pedestrian should be doing.

    So those three construction workers who stood together talking on their phones off Fifth Avenue were safe from wrath. Same for the woman who frequently asks for spare change next to St. Michael's Church on 33rd Street when she's on her cell. She's usually sitting.

    In 15 mornings of counting in late November and December, the average was 48.6 people. The most was 67. The fewer was 28, on the rainy day our Fifth Avenue textlete felt he had room to maneuver. Generally speaking, it was about one in 10 pedestrians.

    In that time, I saw a woman nearly flattened by a taxi when she stepped off a curb into traffic while looking into her cell phone. A bicycle messenger rode and talked on his phone at the same time. One gabber pushed a baby stroller. One morning two police officers were on the phone. A man nearly bumped into me after swiveling his head mid-step from his screen to watch the backside of a woman passing by.

    Even people not using their smart phones kept them in their hands, like drawn weapons. It's become an accepted part of urban posture.

    Mind you, this is winter in the Northeast; the temperature was finger-numbing on many mornings. No problem: I pass by a bus shelter with an advertisement for gloves specially equipped to work touch-screens. There are also smart phone apps that encourage texting while walking, using the device's camera to show a picture on the screen of where a person is walking, visible as a backdrop behind what they're typing.

    Smart phones have replaced tourists as New York pedestrians' biggest headache. We used to disdain people from out of town when they wandered slowly on the sidewalks, looking skyward at tall buildings and muttering as we walked by with purpose.

    Now we're the menace.

    We also used to walk with a certain amount of hyperawareness. Remember muggers creeping from dark corners? Pickpockets who worked the crowds? Now many people walk down the street oblivious to their surroundings, fiddling with an electronic device worth hundreds of dollars.

    One New Yorker who followed my daily Facebook count of distracted pedestrians admits she's one of them. In fact, she often walks down city streets with her husband, both engrossed not in each other, but in their smart phones.

    "I find that my walk to the subway or home at night is the only time I can actually focus on myself," said the woman, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of looking silly. "All of the other times of the day I'm surrounded by people who are constantly grabbing for my attention. I am the classic multitasker."

    While she walks, her mind's usually racing with things she needs to remind co-workers or contacts, things she must tell the baby sitter.

    Why not do it in the moment?

    "I get a lot of dirty looks on the street, from people who are frustrated that I'm not looking where I'm going," she said. "I try hard to be respectful of the other pedestrians and look up and down very frequently."

    A clip posted on YouTube last week of a woman who fell into a fountain while walking and texting at the Berkshire Mall in Wyomissing, Pa., near Reading, has been seen by more than 3 million people. The Pennsylvania woman, Cathy Cruz Marrero, appeared on ABC's "Good Morning America" Thursday with a lawyer and said they're looking into who was responsible for spreading the video. What was so important that she had to text right away? Someone she knew from church had e-mailed to ask when was Marrero's birthday.

    It could be the permanent state of things; smart phone use is growing fast. The Nielsen Co. said that 95 percent of American adults have cell phones. Nearly a third of those are smart phones.

    I'll confess that the devices have driven me to a few minor episodes of sidewalk rage. I've lightly bumped into distracted pedestrians on purpose a couple of times. Not to cause harm — just to snap them from their virtual worlds and make them aware of the real one.

    I've been to parties where clumps of people stared into devices, or texted, instead of actually conversing with humans around them. I always marvel upon landing on a redeye flight from the West Coast at how many people immediately take out their phones and begin dialing. It's 5:30 a.m. — 2:30 in the city they've left. Who are they calling?

    William Powers once saw two women in New York crashing baby strollers into one another because they were both concentrating on phones. Powers, a former Washington Post reporter, wrote the book "Hamlet's BlackBerry," about how an addiction to technology prevents people from doing their best work or forging healthy relationships.

    "We're hard-wired from our primitive ancestors to pay attention to novelty," he said. It happens whenever there are major technological shifts, like the establishment of printing presses, he said. Author Henry David Thoreau, famed for writing about a life in solitude around Walden Pond, once observed in the 1850s that people had become addicted to going to the post office.

    "Didn't we say the same thing a while back about boom boxes and Walkmen?" noted Lizabeth Cohen, professor of American Studies in Harvard University's history department. "Maybe the constant is change."

    Powers believes things will calm down as people become more accustomed to the technology. Knowing you can check your e-mail at any time may become as satisfying as actually doing it, and more phones will stay in the pocket. Society, in its natural course, may impose a new set of behaviors. When cell phones were new, he noted, many people didn't think twice about answering a call while sitting in a theater. Now that's much more rare.

    Changes are noticeable in another part of my journey to work, too. Cell phone conversations used to be fairly commonplace on the commuter train. Now they are widely frowned upon, a new social order set informally by fellow passengers.

    So there's hope. In the meantime, look out for yourself on the street. No one else is.
    I'd like to hear more about that app that allows you to see where your going while you text.

  2. #2
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    It's all over the tech blogs. It's on Android as far as I know, I don't think iOS.

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    No, smart phones aren't making people dumb, those people are just naturally dumb.
    What is Understood, Need Not Be Discussed...."

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    apparently, yes. see here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWtDpGM36J8
    stupid woman was texting and not looking where she was going. serves her right for falling head first into a fountain



    Quote Originally Posted by Blade_27 View Post

    I'd like to hear more about that app that allows you to see where your going while you text.
    see here:
    http://newsfeed.time.com/2010/07/16/...-app-for-that/

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    Quote Originally Posted by GeminiIII View Post
    apparently, yes. see here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWtDpGM36J8
    stupid woman was texting and not looking where she was going. serves her right for falling head first into a fountain




    see here:
    http://newsfeed.time.com/2010/07/16/...-app-for-that/
    And now she's suing. Lol. What loser...

    http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749...y-aid-23909987

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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Ernie View Post
    And now she's suing. Lol. What loser...

    http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749...y-aid-23909987
    "nobody went to my aid"
    my heart bleeds for her
    /sarc

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    Falling Texter in Court
    "I didn't get an apology, what I got was, 'At least nobody knows it was you,' " Marrero said. "But I knew it was me."

    Marrero didn't realize what happened until she was already in the water.

    "Unfortunately, I didn't have anything to grab onto and hold my balance," she said.
    Really!? An apology!?

    You managed to navigate yourself into a large fountain sitting in a vest clearly lit open space & you feel that the mall should some protected guard or hand rail to prevent an embarrassing episode such as yours?

    Blind people have managed to avoid the outcome you couldn't, why is that!?
    Quote Originally Posted by GeminiIII View Post
    Thanks, that's actually a pretty cool app. I wonder if it'll be available for Blackberries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blade_27 View Post
    Thanks, that's actually a pretty cool app. I wonder if it'll be available for Blackberries.
    i've just had a quick google and i can't find anything similar for the BB

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    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (BlackBerry; U; BlackBerry 9780; en) AppleWebKit/534.1+ (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/6.0.0.285 Mobile Safari/534.1+)

    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Ernie
    No, smart phones aren't making people dumb, those people are just naturally dumb.
    I was about to post something along those lines. Its just a distraction. Don't blame it on the devices, blame it on the people who can't stop looking at the device to at least see where they're going.

    That app that lets you see what's going on in front of you seems cool though. People are gonna text and walk anyway, so I don't see it as encouraging the action, but giving those who do a tool to see where they're going at least a bit.


    ... But yea. I do text and walk. That said, I look where I'm going too.

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    Smartphones aren't making people dumb. The problem is that smartphones have been made accessible to dumb people.

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    Also, there are many more dumb people today because dumb people are breeding like rabbits and they clearly lack parenting skills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CeluGeek View Post
    Smartphones aren't making people dumb. The problem is that smartphones have been made accessible to dumb people.
    This couldn't have been worded any better.

    Also, what's the deal with fountain girl? She's upset that the video made it to YouTube (where nobody could ever identify her), so she sues out of embarrassment and goes on television?

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    Anyone remember Alexa Longueira?

    Watch Out!

    On almost any busy street these days you'll find people enamored with their cell phones, happily tapping away at keys or peering at teeny tiny screens. Rarely are they looking straight ahead.

    This apparently was the case when a Staten Island, N.Y., teen who was texting fell into a manhole while strolling with a friend last week.

    Alexa Longueira was about to send a text message when she suddenly slipped under the sidewalk.

    "She literally just handed me the phone and I opened it [and] I felt this big drop," the 15-year-old told the Staten Island Advance.

    "It was four or five feet, it was very painful. I kind of crawled out and the DEP guys came running and helped me," she said. "They were just, like, 'I'm sorry! I'm sorry!'"

    The six-foot landing, which left her with cuts, scrapes and bruises along her spine and ribs was softened by raw sewage.

    The Department of Environmental Protection said its workers briefly left the manhole unattended to fetch cones and was quite conciliatory.

    "DEP is conducting a full investigation of what happened during a manhole incident on Victory Boulevard," said DEP spokeswoman Mercedes Padilla. "We regret that this happened and wish the young woman a speedy recovery."
    But Longueira's family is displeased and, according to the Staten Island Advance, is considering a lawsuit.

    Texting aside, Alexa's mother Kim Longueira said workers never should have left the manhole uncovered and unattended. Although it could have been worse, she said it was still disgusting.

    "Oh my God, it was putrid," she said. "One of her sneakers is still down there."

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    She won't be the last one to do this.
    People that text or otherwise eyes glued to the screens of their smartphones are oblivious to the outside world.
    If they're that oblivious to their surroundings then chances are they won't notice the huge mushroom cloud in the distance..

    Smartphones aren't the problem, people who decide to do this are the problem.. Apparently, some people just don't get it and think they can use their 6th sense to help them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CeluGeek View Post
    Smartphones aren't making people dumb. The problem is that smartphones have been made accessible to dumb people.
    I like the way that I said it better. Lol.

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