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The bad news is that it's only available in China. The good news is that there's something else in the works, hopefully for Western markets.

HMD Global, "The (new) Home of Nokia phones", is a company partly staffed by old-guard Nokia executives, now freed from the terms of their long and contentious partnership with Microsoft to manufacture smartphones under the Nokia brand. Before Christmas they released an old-school candy bar dumb phone, the Nokia 150; this month they've announced what this longtime Nokia fan has pined for since 2010, their first proper Android-powered smartphone.

Notable specs:

5.5 inch Full HD display
Snapdragon 430 processor
4 GB of RAM / 64 GB of storage
16 MP rear camera / 8 MP front camera
Aluminum unibody design
"Latest" version of Android
Price: 1,699 CNY ($245 USD)

Ron Amadeo of Ars Technica is quick to point out that the Nokia 6 is technically not the company's first Android-powered device:

The tag line at Nokia.com calls the Nokia 6 "The first Nokia smartphone powered by Android." HMD might want to brush up on a little Nokia history, though, since this is more like the third Nokia Android phone. The first Nokia Android phones were the "X" line released in February 2014. The technically-still-independent company took an AOSP build and made the UI look a lot like Windows Phone, replacing the Google services with Microsoft ones and creating a "Nokia Store" for apps. A few months later, now under Microsoft rule, Nokia released another Android phone called the "Nokia X2." This took the same Microsoft-y AOSP concept and gave it some updated specs.
Fair point, I guess, though neither of those devices were available anywhere near Canada.

If the China-only release of the Nokia 6 has you down, you may be interested in a story from The Verge about HMD planning an announcement for this year's Mobile World Congress. And if you're wondering whether the brand equity and storied history of Nokia is enough to make it a relevant player in 2017, I'm wondering about that myself...

Sources: HMD Global via Ars Technica, The Verge