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Thread: >10GB Mobile Hotspot Throttle Enforcement on Unlimited Plus

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    >10GB Mobile Hotspot Throttle Enforcement on Unlimited Plus

    I've seen some conflicting reports as to whether AT&T is actually automatically enforcing throttling of hotspot throughput, once mobile hotspot (from a smartphone) usage exceeds 10GB in a given billing cycle.

    Now that there have been a few billing cycles since the plan launched, curious what everyone's experience has been?

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    Me too, though I assume they will enforce it if they haven't already. The not-so-fine print on this is that they will throttle to 128 kbps after 10 GB, which is much stronger language than they use for the total data usage. And 128 kbps is only slightly faster than using a pigeon to send your message.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redman042 View Post
    Me too, though I assume they will enforce it if they haven't already. The not-so-fine print on this is that they will throttle to 128 kbps after 10 GB, which is much stronger language than they use for the total data usage. And 128 kbps is only slightly faster than using a pigeon to send your message.
    There's definitely been conflicting reports, but I have been a couple of cycles with no throttle on 2 unite explores. Also, been running good on mobley hotspots, so hopefully ATT keeps them at 22gb deprioritized.
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    I am not on one of the unlimited plans, but on the 25GB for a reason. I have purposely used up my data, leaving me one day where i was throttled to 128kbs, to see what it would look like. I remember the days of dial up on MSN at 36kbs.
    Web pages load fairly fast, but the graphic's/pictures on the page don't load. No video will work, the symbol just rotates and nothing opens.
    So, throttled data can be used if you only check emails or read news.

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    AT&T's policy has been clear: Physical hotspot devices, tablets, WHPI, connected car and other IoT devices will not be subject to the throttle.

    The only device class that will be subject to the throttle, are smartphones running in hotspot mode.

    The reason I raise this is simple, if you don't like the throttle - add a physical hotspot, it's less than $1/day.

    From AT&T's standpoint, they would rather people pay an extra $20 and have an uncapped physical hotspot, than T-Mobile's methodology that it's better for people to pay for One+ International and have unlimited smartphone hotspot.

    This actually plays to each carrier's strengths. AT&T has more spare backhaul and needs more net adds (new lines of service) whereas T-Mobile has been criticized for low retention and lower ARPU. Each carrier's UDP strategy on unlimited home internet use, matches their investor's chief criticism.
    Last edited by hatoncat; 05-09-2017 at 12:24 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hatoncat View Post
    AT&T's policy has been clear: Physical hotspot devices, tablets, WHPI, connected car and other IoT devices will not be subject to the throttle.

    The only device class that will be subject to the throttle, are smartphones running in hotspot mode.

    The reason I raise this is simple, if you don't like the throttle - add a physical hotspot, it's less than $1/day.

    From AT&T's standpoint, they would rather people pay an extra $20 and have an uncapped physical hotspot, than T-Mobile's methodology that it's better for people to pay for One+ International and have unlimited smartphone hotspot.

    This actually plays to each carrier's strengths. AT&T has more spare backhaul and needs more net adds (new lines of service) whereas T-Mobile has been criticized for low retention and lower ARPU. Each carrier's UDP strategy on unlimited home internet use, matches their investor's chief criticism.
    To be fair, I don't believe we know what ATT will do with their Unlimited plus plans, as it says all lines will have 10GB of hotspot use. Do they count hotspot devices as hotspot? Do they count them as being native data that doesn't utilize hotspot data and fall under 22gb data such as a phones? It appears that is the case for now, however, we see how Verizon did things. (I'm not talking about the terms, as they were clearly stated, I'm talking about how they gave everyone the data unlimited for a few cycles and pulled it out from under them. Also strange that even today some still are going unlimited on the new plan no throttle.)

    The only thing that seems to be certain is the mobley hotspot in whatever plan it's used on, be it the standalone or under unlimited, is not throttled but has the 22gb deprid' limit. As some of us, including myself, have been using it for over a year now with no issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cedius View Post
    To be fair, I don't believe we know what ATT will do with their Unlimited plus plans, as it says all lines will have 10GB of hotspot use.
    Re-read the terms. It clearly (and explicitly) says physical hotspots, connected car, and WHPI are exempted from the 10GB limit. Tablets are exempt as that is counted as on-device use, even in Windows tablets (Surface 2, etc). Basically any device using the broadband APN is exempted.

    And this is because any device that uses broadband APN can't make calls. Again, AT&T wants to get the top spot in terms of lines of service. They're wheeling and dealing to do it. $20 add-a-line home internet for everyone in America, is a great way to accomplish that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hatoncat View Post
    Re-read the terms. It clearly (and explicitly) says physical hotspots, connected car, and WHPI are exempted from the 10GB limit. Tablets are exempt as that is counted as on-device use, even in Windows tablets (Surface 2, etc). Basically any device using the broadband APN is exempted.

    And this is because any device that uses broadband APN can't make calls. Again, AT&T wants to get the top spot in terms of lines of service. They're wheeling and dealing to do it. $20 add-a-line home internet for everyone in America, is a great way to accomplish that.
    The WHPI is used for making phone calls, and doesn't utilize the broadband APN. It's default is nextgenphone....And also, suggesting that ATT is "making $20 add-a-line home internet for everyone" is highly wrong, as you still have to have an unlimited plus plan, and the hotspots are deemed "mobile". The WHPI is indeed an exception, but they also have a rural high cap plan for that device. They definitely do not want to be everyone's home internet for $20 (as I'm paying $100+ for 500GB for "home" internet). Unless you're talking about the mobley connected car, and ATT certainly wouldn't want people utilizing that for "home Internet." I believe you'll see them make a move on that plan soon, as people are abusing it from its intended purpose (myself included), otherwise, they wouldn't have put out a device to use as "home internet" for only $20 stand alone, as that's asinine for any company to do. We are doing so by manipulating it from its intended use, regardless what people say that the timer says "use out of vehicle."

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    AT&T's CEO begs to differ. He has said in public interviews that he does want to reposition AT&T's wireless to be their primary internet delivery vehicle for homes. The DirecTV free streaming (including NOW/OTT free streaming) is part of this.

    Again, Home Internet (WHPI) devices are explicitly listed in the device section exempt from the 10GB quota. Nobody is questioning that.

    AT&T, like T-Mobile, is getting out in front of the inevitable - 5G will ensure that it makes no sense to run the expense of wiring fiber (or copper) to people's homes anymore.

    AT&T has declared war on the cable operators, this is the first blow. Note Verizon, the one carrier making deals with the cable operators - is the only one not offering an option for unlimited off-smartphone LTE data. (Sprint via Mobile Beacon, T-Mobile through One+ International).

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    Quote Originally Posted by hatoncat View Post
    AT&T's CEO begs to differ. He has said in public interviews that he does want to reposition AT&T's wireless to be their primary internet delivery vehicle for homes. The DirecTV free streaming (including NOW/OTT free streaming) is part of this.

    Again, Home Internet (WHPI) devices are explicitly listed in the device section exempt from the 10GB quota. Nobody is questioning that.

    AT&T, like T-Mobile, is getting out in front of the inevitable - 5G will ensure that it makes no sense to run the expense of wiring fiber (or copper) to people's homes anymore.

    AT&T has declared war on the cable operators, this is the first blow. Note Verizon, the one carrier making deals with the cable operators - is the only one not offering an option for unlimited off-smartphone LTE data. (Sprint via Mobile Beacon, T-Mobile through One+ International).
    But it doesn't make any sense for ATT to enforce the 10GB hotspot for phones then, imo. I don't see how that is their "vision" to give everyone unlimited home internet for $20 like you say, as their rural options are much much higher in price and are even affected much less than the areas that you're saying they're providing home internet to for $20. I mean what's stopping everyone in the high density cities from cutting their cable internet and going to a nice $20 standalone ATT unlimited plan? There's a contradiction here.

    If they're truly wanting everyone to have home internet for $20, they shouldn't have the rural high cap plans that high of price imo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cedius View Post
    But it doesn't make any sense for ATT to enforce the 10GB hotspot for phones then, imo.
    No, it does. I explained the logic. If you want a phone and you also want unlimited data for your home, AT&T wants you to pay $20 extra for two lines of service (or $40 extra if it's your second line on a two-line plan). They then get to report to investors that you have two lines of service. This lets them count more new adds, more lines, higher ARPU, and more largess.

    Still, to compete with Verizon, they give you a 10GB quota for on-device tethering. That makes sure VZ can't say their plan is superior in any way.

    Also if you have a two-line plan, they get more money than T-Mobile on One+ International ($40 instead of $25). In turn the consumer gets more surplus - by being able to leave the WHPI/Hotspot at home and not have to worry about unplugging their phone from their router - and what that might do to others in the home.

    Go back and read my first post on this for why T-Mobile does it differently. I think my original explanation is pretty clear and cogent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hatoncat View Post
    No, it does. I explained the logic. If you want a phone and you also want unlimited data for your home, AT&T wants you to pay $20 extra for two lines of service (or $40 extra if it's your second line on a two-line plan). They then get to report to investors that you have two lines of service. This lets them count more new adds, more lines, higher ARPU, and more largess.

    Also if you have a two-line plan, they get more money than T-Mobile on One+ International ($40 instead of $25).

    Go back and read my first post on this for why T-Mobile does it differently. I think my original explanation is pretty clear and cogent.
    So you're saying that they want you to open up a second hotspot line, and purposely gimping phone mhs capability? Fair enough. Again, the other points of my post weren't addressed (home internet for all, cord cutting, rural plan pricing) because there's contradictions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cedius View Post
    So you're saying that they want you to open up a second hotspot line, and purposely gimping phone mhs capability? Fair enough. Again, the other points of my post weren't addressed (home internet for all, cord cutting, rural plan pricing) because there's contradictions.
    I don't think it's a contradiction at all. AT&T knows that they have excess bandwidth in most areas. They want to compete head-on with cable. They want people choosing to pay $20 to AT&T for home internet now (especially if they're already paying ~$100 for an Unlimited Plus base plan), instead of paying $50 to $75 to Comcast/Charter/etc.

    The home internet cord cutters will be deprioritized after 22GB. So if too many sign up, the experience becomes 1-2 Mbps and those people will switch back to cable on their own self-selection. This lets AT&T game the market, and sell Unlimited Plus as a cord-cutter solution in markets where bandwidth is flowing freely.

    Case in point, there's not enough bandwidth at (the tower closest to) my parent's house for me to switch them off cable. I can get at-best 7 Mbps there. But at my office and my apartment, I'm getting up to 100 Mbps. Guess what I cancelled completely? Cable internet. AT&T wins because I'm now using their unused bandwidth, and paying them profits for it, even if at $20/line.

    This is the start of the 5G era. Much as HSPA was 3.5G until it suddently became 4G / FauxG, Gigabit LTE will eventually be rebranded as 5G / 5auxG too. And yes, I just coined the term 5auxG.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hatoncat View Post
    I don't think it's a contradiction at all. AT&T knows that they have excess bandwidth in most areas. They want to compete head-on with cable. They want people choosing to pay $20 to AT&T for home internet now (especially if they're already paying ~$100 for an Unlimited Plus base plan), instead of paying $50 to $75 to Comcast/Charter/etc.

    The home internet cord cutters will be deprioritized after 22GB. So if too many sign up, the experience becomes 1-2 Mbps and those people will switch back to cable on their own self-selection. This lets AT&T game the market, and sell Unlimited Plus as a cord-cutter solution in markets where bandwidth is flowing freely.

    Case in point, there's not enough bandwidth at (the tower closest to) my parent's house for me to switch them off cable. I can get at-best 7 Mbps there. But at my office and my apartment, I'm getting up to 100 Mbps. Guess what I didn't sign up for? Cable internet.

    This is the start of the 5G era. Much as HSPA was 3.5G until it suddently became 4G / FauxG, Gigabit LTE will eventually be rebranded as 5G / 5auxG too. And yes, I just coined the term 5auxG.
    I could understand if ATT was dishing out home internet for $20 on 5G devices, but none of the devices we are talking about are 5G capable. Also, Verizon, per Reddit whiners, has already shown that dishing out unlimited has brought on major congestion in many areas(even with hard throttle). I just don'understand why ATT would want to subject themselves to this kind of burden on the network.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cedius View Post
    I could understand if ATT was dishing out home internet for $20 on 5G devices, but none of the devices we are talking about are 5G capable. Also, Verizon, per Reddit whiners, has already shown that dishing out unlimited has brought on major congestion in many areas(even with hard throttle). I just don'understand why ATT would want to subject themselves to this kind of burden on the network.
    Gigabit LTE is likely to be branded as 5G. All I can say on that subject for now.

    But it doesn't matter. This is the start of the 5G wars. 5G was when the carriers were supposed to compete head-on with cable. AT&T has started that war, with Unlimited Plus.

    AT&T wants to do a stress test now, so they aren't caught off-guard when 5G begins willing out nationwide. Randall says the network is up to it - in a pretty bombastic nature when asked in interviews. I tend to agree.

    With 5G, most/all connections are likely to be speed-rated and unlimited. AT&T also was the first (mainstream carrier) to pull this lever with Unlimited Choice vs Unlimited Plus. 3 Mbps throttled, but unlimited, for less money.

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