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Thread: Should we care about speed caps (Cricket 8 mbps, Verizon MVNO 5 mpbs, etc)?

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    Should we care about speed caps (Cricket 8 mbps, Verizon MVNO 5 mpbs, etc)?

    Assuming one is using a smartphone as a smartphone, are speed caps no big deal and would not cause negative experiences? Not talking about tethering or trying to use it for home internet.

    The Cricket reviews I have seen say that the 8 mbps limit has no adverse impact for the average user. Coverage is supposed to be much more important.

    My understanding is that the Verizon MVNO's cap at 5 mbps, same question.

    Anyone know if the T-Mobile MVNO's cap speeds? Metro PCS does not, technically they are not a MVNO (I think).

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    Data speed is not that big a deal..until I moved to a carrier (MetroPCS from Cricket) that has excellent speeds. With Metro, I routinely get 70-75mbps vs Cricket at 1/10th of that. I had Cricket for a year (moved over from AIO) and I did experience more no ring, missed calls while on Cricket than I ever did with Verizon prepaid (PagePlus) or certainly Metro.

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    Hard to believe metropcs (tmobile) has better coverage in some areas than att. Although, I suppose it could be a case of a dead spot. In my immediate area, tmobile reception is terrible. Att is excellent, vzw/sprint about the same.

    @jimxx200 what devices were used on each of the carriers you mentioned above?

    That said, I think it depends what you intend to do with the mobile data. 8 mbps allows for sustained 1MB/s throughput. Playing a youtube video at hd resolution (1920 x 1080), I see a sustained average throughput on the pc of about 350-450KB/s. Should play just fine on the cell phone.

    With a 2560x1440 video, buffering takes longer, but playback is fine with out any stuttering or buffering once the initial buffering is done.



    Of course, with faster internet, playback begins almost immediately vs buffering for a few seconds. IMO, I think the faster speeds are more useful for bragging rights than practical use. Faster speeds will be necessary once 4K video is available for cell phones.

    I haven't done video chat yet, so not sure how much bw that requires.

    From this link - https://support.skype.com/en/faq/FA1...oes-skype-need , skype recommends 1.5mbps in each direction for hd video calling. Again, 8mbps (symmetrical) should have plenty of margin.

    For all other things, email, navigation, web browsing, etc, 8mbps is more than adequate. I think cricket found a good medium between price and bandwidth capacity. What is one really going to do with 75mbps on a cell phone?

    For reference, my home internet connection Talk about getting spoiled.

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    MVNO are low cost plans, with limited data allowances. Even if we could watch HD videos on the present capped speeds, nobody should do it on those plans, because you can hit the data limit in a few hours.
    Sure, for bragging rights some might feel that are somewhat inferior... And they should definitely move to a postpaid unlimited plan.

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    IMHO, the 5-or-8 Mbps throttled limits for some MVNOs are of no consequence for a "phone" (and, I'd contend, for a tablet as well).

    Those speeds are fine for any reasonable kind of streaming. With 5-6 inch screens 4K source media is unlikely, and in any event I don't personally want to spend lengthy periods of time streaming something "good" to a tiny phone screen. Most apps are a couple of dozen megabytes in size and can be downloaded in a few seconds under these throttled speeds. The kinds of giant files that I might dabble with on a desktop are non-issues for a phone. If I want to DL something massive (infrequent; maybe music or -- on my tablet -- movies for a trip) I'll be using my home WiFi. If I want serious DL speed I'll just hardwire the device into my home Gigabit Ethernet network.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gotg6 View Post
    Assuming one is using a smartphone as a smartphone, are speed caps no big deal and would not cause negative experiences? Not talking about tethering or trying to use it for home internet.

    The Cricket reviews I have seen say that the 8 mbps limit has no adverse impact for the average user. Coverage is supposed to be much more important.

    My understanding is that the Verizon MVNO's cap at 5 mbps, same question....
    It only matters for bragging rights or if your work or hobby requires downloading or uploading large amounts of data.

    A friend has ATT postpaid and I have unthrottled ATT with Tracfone. We generally only get 2-4 Mbps around here anyway.

    Same goes for Verizon. My Tracfone with Verizon is throttled to 5 Mbps down. It doesn't matter. They have only provisioned the network around here so that we usually only get less than 5 Mbps anyway.

    My home cable Internet was only 5 Mbps until recently. When they upgraded it to 15 Mbps I didn't even notice.

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    If you only have a few GB of fast data before being throttled I don't think speed makes much difference.

    A speed from 5 to 8 mbps is fast enough for most streaming to work OK.

    Speed will make a difference if you have an unlimited plan. If I am waiting on a large download a faster speed makes a big difference. For example on at&t DSL at 1 mbps it can take days to download a large file.

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    It's funny how much location makes the difference. For my area (Syracuse, NY) I would definitely carry a T-Mobile/MVNO of T-Mobile any day over att or it's MVNOs. Now. A year ago or two? Nope. But att doesn't have better coverage for the areas I work live and play.

    Even speed/latency wise. And ATT has lots of spectrum. They've been rather overwhelmed for years and just won't put the capex in to fix well known spectrum starved areas or known LTE coverage gaps.

    It's so very personal. For work I have a att and Verizon line (I develop apps for a large company and have lots of new test lines I use). But Google voice and T-Mobile and I'm a happy camper.

    But being cognizant that it's rather personal doesn't help for all. I found when my personal line was on AIO/Cricket that the lower network priority as well as high latency made the cost savings/slightly better coverage not worth while for me.

    Most of the time lower Mbps is just fine, unless latency and package retransmission makes it not worthwhile. But super low latency and high download definitely can make an appreciable difference.

    Rambling aside, try them all YMMV.

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