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Thread: A 3-watt cell phone?

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    A 3-watt cell phone?

    Greetings,

    I heard that old cell phones have 3-watt of power while the newer onces only have like 0.3 watt or 0.2 watt of power.

    How does the 'watt' affect the phone's reception?

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    Re: A 3-watt cell phone?

    Originally posted by godsfantasy
    Greetings,

    I heard that old cell phones have 3-watt of power while the newer onces only have like 0.3 watt or 0.2 watt of power.

    How does the 'watt' affect the phone's reception?
    I believe the higher the watts, the stronger the signal your phone sends out, although it will fry your brain.

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    This is a 3-watt analogue phone



    Handheld phones are limited by law to 0.6 watts of analogue output power. Remember, this wattage is only important in analogue areas, which are becoming fewer and far between.

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    How is wattage not important in digital?

    And this is why I prefer using the T-130, and the 270 Timeport - stronger signal. Chances are, I'll get hit by a bus someday, so frying my brain is not a big deal. Besides, it helps me relate to customer better that way.
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    Re: A 3-watt cell phone?

    Originally posted by godsfantasy
    Greetings,

    I heard that old cell phones have 3-watt of power while the newer onces only have like 0.3 watt or 0.2 watt of power.

    How does the 'watt' affect the phone's reception?
    You used to be able to buy 3 watt booster kits for rural areas. Some truckers use them. I've got an old NEC 4500 bag phone that is 3 watt. I'm planning on activating it on Rogers PAYG soon and keeping it in the car for *****s and giggles.
    Watts knot write a boot thee weigh eye right? Thus spill cheques feign.

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    Originally posted by b3ll m0b1l1ty
    How is wattage not important in digital?

    And this is why I prefer using the T-130, and the 270 Timeport - stronger signal. Chances are, I'll get hit by a bus someday, so frying my brain is not a big deal. Besides, it helps me relate to customer better that way.
    Digital PCS technology was developed around a 0.6 watt model. Using 3 watts to a digital tower constantly will not improve coverage. Booster kits actually have automatic gain...that's quite different from a simple wattage increase.

    Automatic Gain boosters tend to decrease the signal to noise ratio as their gain ramps up. So it will work for some PCS systems, and not others.

    I remember there was one system that would measure the sending signal at the cellphone, and boost its receiving gain by 2 times that amount. So if the phone was "straining" to see the tower by raising its level, the booster would raise its level to allow the phone to "hear" the tower better.

    and the 0.6 watts only applies to a phone that has tranceiver equipment which is pressed up against the head. That's why boosters are not illegal.
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    i am not sure if what you mean by your explanation of booster kits, but power booster kits (like the ones you used to be able to get for analog phones) are not available for CDMA phones.
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    No, I'm referring to actual amplifiers that work in conjuncton with the cellphone, not the basic RF Boosters.

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    Originally posted by b3ll m0b1l1ty
    Chances are, I'll get hit by a bus someday, so frying my brain is not a big deal.
    Yes, although frying your brain increases dramatically the chances of you getting hit by a bus. Because you're not thinking straight.

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    CDMA phones will step up their output power as necessary to be able to keep in contact with the tower. I fyou hook up a power amplifier to a CDMA phone, it will continue to increase it's power output until it ends up kicking every other CDMA phone off the network. There is no way to increase the power output of the phone. The best way to increase reception is by using an external antenae. The N370 has amazing reception in fringe areas when using a 5dB gain external antenae (approx 20 miles from tower in 800MHz without dropping to analog)

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    Not true... There are CDMA cellular amplifiers that take advantage of the phone turning its power up to compensate for a distant tower. They don't increase wattage, they increase GAIN.... GAIN is not the same as wattage. Think of gain as an input volume control - all you're doing is feeding the phone a hotter signal. It's up to the phone to deal with the lower signal-to-noise ratio that boosting gain on RF signals produces. It's got nothing to do with boosting wattage.

    Most CDMA phones are robust enough to handle the decreased S/N Ratio and benefit from a gain boosting amplifier.

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    i have never heard of any such device, and one of our locations has an install bay...i have asked about kits to install for better reception, and the installed said there is no such thing for new digital phones, only and external antenna is available for some models.

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    Radioframe makes some and there's an israeli company who makes them as well.

    http://www.ssbtech.com/ also makes them now apparently.

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    Believe me, in Northern Ontario we have seen all sorts of booster kits that claim to work with CDMA. I have never seen one actually work. Usually, the customers phone will ring, and as soon as the answer it, the power steps up until the tower actually shuts down and resets. The only solution I've ever seen is a Motorola 3-watt boost kit for a Star Tac phone. An 8767 Timeport can be programmed that as soon as it is connected to the booster, it switches to analog, and stays in analog until it is removed. Every other system simply fails.

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    Originally posted by Deckster
    Believe me, in Northern Ontario we have seen all sorts of booster kits that claim to work with CDMA. I have never seen one actually work. Usually, the customers phone will ring, and as soon as the answer it, the power steps up until the tower actually shuts down and resets. The only solution I've ever seen is a Motorola 3-watt boost kit for a Star Tac phone. An 8767 Timeport can be programmed that as soon as it is connected to the booster, it switches to analog, and stays in analog until it is removed. Every other system simply fails.

    It would certainly do this if the amp was fixed at a 3-watt output. But the same would also happen if a 0.6-watt CDMA phone only put out exactly 0.6 watts of power.

    If your transmitter has a variable wattage, and "3 watts" is only the maximum, these problems should not occur.



    There are a couple of such 3-watt transmitters on the market:

    The SmoothTalker (which only amplifies one band):

    http://www.susitnaenergy.com/SmoothT...ellular Phones


    And the PowerMax:

    www.digitalantenna.com/cellamp_DA4000.html



    And for those trying to maximize their call quality, your antenna's gain is just as important as your phone's wattage.

    The 9dB (5dBd) Gain antennas offered by either company are the best option in flat areas far from cell towers, but are not so good near cell towers or in hilly areas.

    The 7dB (3dBd) Gain antenna offered by SmoothTalker is good in distant areas, and also works near cell towers and in hilly country.

    People in mountainous areas should probably consider a lower gain antenna for best performance.

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