• Your iPhone Does Indeed Slow Down Over Time



    But it's not why you might think.

    The urban myth is that Apple deliberately sneaks code into iOS updates to make your older iPhone run slower, in the hopes that you'll buy a new one. It's like that old joke: Android users buy a new phone because they're not getting software updates, while iPhone users buy a new phone because they got a software update.

    As far as I know, nothing about this has ever been proven—at least not until now. Ars Technica has compiled an excellent report on research by Geekbench developer John Poole and the iPhone community on reddit. It turns out the Apple may indeed be deliberately throttling performance on your older hardware, but its reasons for doing so are benign. There's no planned obsolescence here, but there is code within iOS that senses battery degradation, and limits performance for the express purpose of preserving your battery.

    The successful remedy to a throttled iPhone is to replace the battery, but Apple really doesn't want you to do that, bringing us right back to the contentious issue of planned obsolescence. Maybe the next best thing would be to buy one of those battery cases...?

    Source: Ars Technica

    ---------
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Your iPhone Does Indeed Slow Down Over Time started by acurrie View original post
    Comments 14 Comments
    1. Doolie's Avatar
      Doolie -
      I took my iPhone 6S to my neighborhood Apple certified repair shop in 2016 and they replaced my battery for free, under warranty and Apple encouraged me to do so. My iPhone experienced no slowdown. I disagree that Apple really doesn’t want its’ customers to replace batteries when needed.
    1. TwitchyPuppy's Avatar
      TwitchyPuppy -
      Based on my uninterrupted iOS experience since 2009, I can confirm this is not true.

      I still have a 4s on 9.3.5 and it’s still faster then when it was on iOS 7.
      It’s called optimisation.

      Of course, battery life is not what it used to be, but still.


      Sent from my iPhone 8 Plus on Bell’s network using Tapatalk Pro
    1. Guest510's Avatar
      Guest510 -
      Based on my experience, IPhone batteries have more years of service than Samsung batteries. The Samsung batteries took a dramatic downturn after 2 years.
    1. Doolie's Avatar
      Doolie -
      Here is as an official response as any from Apple...

      https://techcrunch.com/2017/12/20/ap...unning-slower/
    1. Donkey's Avatar
      Donkey -
      my iPhone 6S didn't slow down after IOS updated.
    1. billm261's Avatar
      billm261 -
      My iPad Mini went downhill right after I upgraded to iOS 11. Much slower, shorter battery life and it now stutters/freezes. It was perfect before the upgrade and I’m sorry I did it.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    1. NotABiot's Avatar
      NotABiot -
      "The successful remedy to a throttled iPhone is to replace the battery, but Apple really doesn't want you to do that.... "

      Battery goes bad in a $5.00 tv remote you got from Big Lots: replace the battery in an operation that takes mere seconds and doesn't risk destroying the device.

      Battery goes bad in an iPhone: throw it away if you are doing what Apple wants you to do (they consider it to be disposable junk, I guess!) or do a laborious time-consuming fiddly operation requiring several tools and has a risk of wrecking the whole thing in order to just replace the battery.

      Sorry, Apple, in some ways your design deficiencies are taking us backwards. not forwards.
    1. NotABiot's Avatar
      NotABiot -
      Quote Originally Posted by Doolie View Post
      I took my iPhone 6S to my neighborhood Apple certified repair shop in 2016 and they replaced my battery for free, under warranty and Apple encouraged me to do so. My iPhone experienced no slowdown. I disagree that Apple really doesn’t want its’ customers to replace batteries when needed.
      "I disagree that Apple really doesn’t want its’ customers to replace batteries when needed. "

      If they really did want customers to replace batteries, they would have (At best) a simple quick button to pop the back off to replace the battery (See the LG V20) or at worst, 6 tiny stanard Philips screws to hold the back on to enable easy battery replacement.

      I don't go to a special "certified" store to replace the batteries in my flashlight, and there is no good reason to require this for replacing the battery in a phone.
    1. Doolie's Avatar
      Doolie -
      Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
      "I disagree that Apple really doesn’t want its’ customers to replace batteries when needed. "

      If they really did want customers to replace batteries, they would have (At best) a simple quick button to pop the back off to replace the battery (See the LG V20) or at worst, 6 tiny stanard Philips screws to hold the back on to enable easy battery replacement.

      I don't go to a special "certified" store to replace the batteries in my flashlight, and there is no good reason to require this for replacing the battery in a phone.
      Talk to all the other cellphone manufacturers that make phones with non-replaceable batteries. Apple’s iPhone is by far easier to replace in my opinion.

      I didn’t even need to take it to a Apple certified repair center. I could have went to the mall to the “We repair cellphones and vape shop”.

      The certified repair center was a few blocks from my house. I know the owner and it was free under Apple’s battery recall program, my phone was out of warranty also. Apple encouraged me to replace my battery.

      I go with a certified repair with Apple, for the same reason I go with a certified Maytag repair.
    1. billm261's Avatar
      billm261 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Doolie View Post

      I didn’t even need to take it to a Apple certified repair center. I could have went to the mall to the “We repair cellphones and vape shop”.
      Chances are you received an OEM battery by going to the certified repair shop.

      Kiosk repair shops in the malls may very well be using some low grade battery.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    1. Doolie's Avatar
      Doolie -
      Quote Originally Posted by billm261 View Post
      Chances are you received an OEM battery by going to the certified repair shop.

      Kiosk repair shops in the malls may very well be using some low grade battery.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
      Exactly so! I have a friend who still clings to his Blackberry and carries a pocket full of cheap batteries he bought on Amazon manufactured who knows where, and what these will do to his phone.

      Also I am sure that Apple is recycling or taking care of its’ used batteries in a much more environmentally friendly manner. I think my friend just throws his used Blackberry batteries in the trash, since there are no regulations regarding batteries in the community where I live here in the US.

      https://www.apple.com/environment/
    1. NotABiot's Avatar
      NotABiot -
      "Exactly so! I have a friend who still clings to his Blackberry '''''

      Sounds like a bitter clinger indeed. And the police will always be able to find that Blackberry guy, because, like the Martian Manhunter and his Oreo crumbs, the Blackberry guy will leave a trail of batteries where-ever he goes.

      He will also be recognized for his dress .... OH wait, sorry, wrong type of klinger.
    1. George Knighton's Avatar
      George Knighton -
      I can understand why iOS will slow down a device with a waning battery.

      But iOS should warn you about it so that you can make an intelligent decision about what to do.
    1. dalbrich's Avatar
      dalbrich -
      iOS has like 40,000 settings today (probably an exaggeration but you know what I mean). Just add one under system or whatever that says 'preserve battery by slowing phone' or whatever you want to call it. Make it a radio slider button like everything else.

      Let the *owner* decide how they want it. If they experience poor battery life, they can change the setting back.

      Anyway, quite simple.

      -Dan

      PS: If I purchase an aftermarket battery for my iPhone 6, does apple automatically un-throttle?