Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Switching over from the iphone !!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    44
    Device(s)
    SE p990i, m600, k800, k750
    Carrier(s)
    AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0

    Switching over from the iphone !!!

    Hey;

    i currently own the iphone 3gs and been following the n900 for awhile looking to switch over asap !!!

    since i am a newbie here i just have a question before i make the plunge. I have been reading that the n900 is incompatible with att 3g network. Is there a possible NAM version soon ( i got a n95 8gb international version when it first came out only to realize a NAM version release a month later). So i rather not ruin my chances again.

    Thanks folks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,122
    Feedback Score
    0
    It looks like it's going to release with T-mobile here, so there won't be an att compatible version. Future ones might support at&t though, such as the keyboardless N920 that's in the pipeline.

    If you need 3G, don't take the plunge.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    44
    Device(s)
    SE p990i, m600, k800, k750
    Carrier(s)
    AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks !!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,206
    Device(s)
    Samsung SGS II i9100 /Note 2 N7100/Nokia 6126
    Carrier(s)
    ATT since before they went Orange....
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by adamatus
    Hey;

    i currently own the iphone 3gs and been following the n900 for awhile looking to switch over asap !!!

    since i am a newbie here i just have a question before i make the plunge. I have been reading that the n900 is incompatible with att 3g network. Is there a possible NAM version soon ( i got a n95 8gb international version when it first came out only to realize a NAM version release a month later). So i rather not ruin my chances again.

    Thanks folks
    Hold of for ATT 3G version. Why pay all that money for a clipped phone?

    Surely Nokia has not abandoned ATT's user base and will come out with a even better phone than the N900 for us down the line. They always do.
    SMART PHONE TEST
    ATT since before Cingular
    Samsung Galaxy Note II
    GT-N7100


    Omega v7.2 JB - 4.1.2 XXDLJ2

    Kernel: XXDLJ2
    Modem: XXDLJ2

    64GB Sandisk class 6

    Ebay-Tombo7777
    Previous, N82,N95-2,N95-4, N97 iPhone 3GS, Captivate, SGSII i9100, ATT Note SGH-i777 Sold $475 Note N7000 Sold $340

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    In the cradle of US telecommunications
    Posts
    77
    Device(s)
    Nokia N90, N80, N73, N93, N95, N95 8GB, N78, N82, N97, E90, E71
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile USA
    Feedback Score
    0
    I'm just talking from inferences, but I'm guessing Nokia chose TMO for the N900 because it can drink bandwidth, and with at&t's issues, it probably isn't suitable for having a good experience on the N900. TMO's 3G is now fastest in the country, if the speed test data is accurate.

    I don't thiink Nokia will have an at&t model, unless they subsidize it. Look at this as an opportunity to upgrade to a better carrier with massive 3G deployment plans and great service, the opposite of att.

    And calling will work, just not 3G. If you have prevalent WiFi, it may not be a big issue.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,122
    Feedback Score
    0
    I dont think that this has anything to do with at&t's bandwidth issues, more likely that they shopped it around and t-mobile wanted it but at&t didn't or wanted something else.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    In the cradle of US telecommunications
    Posts
    77
    Device(s)
    Nokia N90, N80, N73, N93, N95, N95 8GB, N78, N82, N97, E90, E71
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile USA
    Feedback Score
    0
    No, because there is no carrier partner for the N900 in the US. And in the online chat with Jussi Makinen, one of the maemo bosses, he wouldn't directly condemn at&t's network issues, but he did mention the experience issue, and how the iPhone needs alot of bandwidth, so it was kind of implied.

    The AWS band is open, growing fast, and faster than anything available in the US. Nokia is helping build the network, so they know. Also, before they began offering NAM models, it was TMo that offered Symbian device subsidies via its Premium Collection at CompUSA and Best Buy. Most of the N95 users were at TMo, and were angrily forced to move to the less reliable and costlier at&t. They're just correcting a 2 year old mistake.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310
    Feedback Score
    0
    Any more word these days on whether T-Mobile will subsidize the N900? It wasn't part of today's Project Dark announcement. And it seems like, with Project Dark, that T-Mobile is trying to move away from subsidizing phones at all. But it's hard to imagine that many Americans paying $560 up front, even if economically in the long run it makes sense.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    In the cradle of US telecommunications
    Posts
    77
    Device(s)
    Nokia N90, N80, N73, N93, N95, N95 8GB, N78, N82, N97, E90, E71
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile USA
    Feedback Score
    0
    Tell that to the Amazon preorders. Its Amazon's #1 preselling device right now...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by christexaport
    Tell that to the Amazon preorders. Its Amazon's #1 preselling device right now...
    I'm not sure that means much. How many sales does that represent? A few thousand? Even that many? I mean, presales? How many people even get a cell phone by presale? I'm sure it's a tiny fraction of a fraction of a percent of Americans. Of course a lot of early adopters and gadget geeks are dying to grab up this phone as soon as it's available (myself included). But what I said was, "It's hard to imagine that many Americans paying $560 up front, even if economically in the long run it makes sense." I don't think the early adopters and gadget geeks represent "Americans" in general. If the device is going to sell millions, like the iPhone, or even in the hundreds of thousands, it's not going to be at retail ($560) through Amazon. That's what I meant.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Parts Unknown
    Posts
    7,540
    Device(s)
    Nokia N900
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    A lot has been said about what step the N900 represents in Nokia's vision of what a mobile computer with cell phone connectivity is in the market. Whatever step it is, the consensus seems to have been that the N900 or its firmware/OS version is not the final step.

    With that^ said I believe anyone who is happy with what the iPhone gives them, and accepts the iPhones single task limitations, will be disappointed with the N900 if they switch to it from the iPhone.

    Out of the box the N900 will have less software available, more bug related software updates, and a much steeper learning curve...


    However.... 3 months later, the N900 owner will be happier with his purchase and their satisfaction will continue to grow as they realize that:

    • More and more free applications have become available for the N900 and that they had a say in the development of some of those applications or can configure them more to their specific needs then ones available for sale on the iPhone.

    • Each firmware update that they did receive over the air for their N900 actually improved its functionality and didn't cripple its connectivity even further.

    • The learning process for the N900 was not painful at all and that they now feel a part of a vibrant, growing community that shares their enthusiasm for the device and its OS and is less concerned with how much time or money they spend in the App Store.




    ...and as always, imho.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    310
    Feedback Score
    0
    That makes sense. I also think a benefit of the N900 may be precisely that it is not wildly popular like the iPhone. Apple likes to tout the eighteen-hundred bazillion apps available in the app store. But we all know that seventeen-hundred and ninety-nine bazillion of those apps are fart simulators. The gold rush to create iPhone apps and try to make it big in the iPhone app store has produced a lot of crap. Like all mass markets, more usually ends up meaning a lot of the lowest common denominator, because you want to appeal to the most people.

    The N900 will likely never have as many apps as the iPhone. But the ones that do exist may be more useful and innovative. Especially on the freeware side. As a Linux user, I'm amazed at how much innovation comes out of the open-source community. Yes there's a million and one programs to download for Windows. But at the end of the day, a lot of the things that seem innovative (especially in OS X) are actually stolen from Linux and were available there a couple years before. The open-source Linux world is a more sophisticated and thoughtful place, I think.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,455
    Device(s)
    Nokia E72 / Motorola Milestone
    Carrier(s)
    AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by T Bong
    Hold of for ATT 3G version. Why pay all that money for a clipped phone?

    Surely Nokia has not abandoned ATT's user base and will come out with a even better phone than the N900 for us down the line. They always do.



    We're still waiting...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,215
    Carrier(s)
    At&t
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by cb474
    I'm not sure that means much. How many sales does that represent? A few thousand? Even that many? I mean, presales? How many people even get a cell phone by presale? I'm sure it's a tiny fraction of a fraction of a percent of Americans. Of course a lot of early adopters and gadget geeks are dying to grab up this phone as soon as it's available (myself included). But what I said was, "It's hard to imagine that many Americans paying $560 up front, even if economically in the long run it makes sense." I don't think the early adopters and gadget geeks represent "Americans" in general. If the device is going to sell millions, like the iPhone, or even in the hundreds of thousands, it's not going to be at retail ($560) through Amazon. That's what I meant.
    I know that the entire goal for a business model is profit... but the n900 isn't marketed to the everyday consumer. It sort of is marketed to the gadget geeks if there is any marketing at all. All I saw before were ads and the people who bought it were pretty much people who knew it was or if they tried it out at the nokia store and liked it. I don't see a subsidy happening anytime soon... but maybe the subsidization of MIDs like the Dell Mini 5/Streak will sway Nokia into this direction. I don't want Nokia to subsidize the next device with AT&T but that's just me.

Bookmarks