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Thread: Sprint: Ethernet backhaul gives us 20 times more bandwidth

  1. #1
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    Sprint: Ethernet backhaul gives us 20 times more bandwidth

    http://www.fiercebroadbandwireless.c...FierceWireless


    August 15, 2012 | By Sue Marek

    Sprint Nextel's (NYSE:S) upgrade of its backhaul network from T1s to Ethernet will create such better efficiency for the company that it will reduce the cost of delivering data, even as consumer demand for data skyrockets. In fact, making the switch to Ethernet backhaul will give Sprint 20 times the bandwidth capacity at a cell site location, said a Sprint executive.

    Speaking at the Pacific Crest Global Technology Leadership conference earlier this week in Vail, Colo., Sprint Nextel's Vice President of Strategic ProgramsMarty Nevshemal said that one of the goals of the company's Network Vision network modernization plan is to lower the cost of delivering data. As an example, Nevshemal said that the company might pay $1,500 per month for T1 backhaul at a tower site. That T1 might deliver 4.5 MB of backhaul capacity. When Sprint switches to Ethernet, Nevshemal said that for the same price of $1,500 per month, Sprint will get almost 20 times the backhaul bandwidth at that location. "Your unit cost for that part of the network--the backhaul--is 95 percent cheaper to put a bit of data through that backhaul. That is Network Vision," he said.

    When asked whether Sprint can continue to offer its $79 per month unlimited data package, Nevshemal said that it's hard for the company to predict whether it will be able to offer unlimited data to customers indefinitely because it depends on how much data consumers will use--U.S. operators have seen data usage skyrocket as consumers rapidly upgrade to smartphones and those smartphones become more sophisticated in their capabilities. Sprint made headlines last month when an executive said that the company expects to offer unlimited data service for Apple's (NASDAQ:AAPL) LTE-compatible iPhone 5 when it comes out this fall--that is, if the rumored iPhone 5 actually launches and if Sprint gets it.

    Interestingly, Nevshemal also said that the company will likely accelerate its launch of LTE markets in the fourth quarter. He said the carrier will have around 25 markets equipped with LTE by year-end. In mid-July, Sprint launched LTE in Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Kansas City and San Antonio. He said that Sprint will begin notifying customers of the impending LTE launch in a market about 30 days in advance of the service being commercially available.

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    The T1s to Ethernet upgrade only makes sense due to the band with capacity.
    Long live the McDonald fish fillet!

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    Yeah, saying GB Ethernet is x times faster then a T1 isn't really earth shattering. The bit about accelerating NV in Q4 was more interesting though. There seem to be a lot of markets getting close to launch if you go by what they say on the other site.

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    Without doing the "research", I doubt that saying "Ethernet" is technically correct. Ethernet has very specific timing and distance limitations that prevent it from serving as a WAN, which of course is why it is consider a LAN solution. So more than likely there is some other transport method doing the WAN part (long distance). I think original Ethernet is limited to about 1km distances.

    There is a reason why WAN solutions like T1, T3, OCx, etc exist in addition to the 30-year old Ethernet technologies.

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    Looking into it further, they must be talking about Ethernet WAN, which is a relatively new modification of the Ethernet standards to permit WAN usage (long distances). A WAN PHY is now included in the new 10GE (10Gbit Ethernet) standard. Sounds like a win over the traditional (expensive on a per bandwidth basis) WAN solutions...

    http://www.brocade.com/downloads/doc...-AG-187-01.pdf

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    I'm sure they are talking about "Ethernet over Copper" -- a LOT of providers are beginning to offer this; it provides similar "carrier grade" uptime as T1, but has the distance limitations of DSL.

    At my work we pay about 800/month for 3 T1 lines (4.5 megs) but were just notified we can now get a 10 meg EoC connection for 680, or a 20 meg connection for 1020.

    They offer the same SLA as a T1 but the price is less for more--again the only 'catch' is that the distance limitation is similar to DSL so it isn't available everywhere (T1s can be amplified numerous times if needed, this not so much) and only 2 lines can be combined for 20 megs of service vs. up to 12 T1s if you can afford it.

    Seems like a no brainer to me, and have the upgrade order in place--we'll see how it turns out.

    If it is truly what they describe, it seems like exactly what Sprint needs--at least in urban/suburban areas that can get it.

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    I should read up on Ethernet WAN, just for interest. I wonder if it turns the normal Ethernet protocol into a point-point protocol much like T1, SLIP, PPP, etc, etc. I believe most (all?) of the traditional WAN solutions are essentially point-point. Ethernet, as a bus-topology, CSMA/CD (MA==multiple access) is not P-P and that is the origin of the timing and distance limitations (you have to wait to see if someone else is "talking" and you have to deal with collisions (CD==collision detection), none of which are issues in a P-P connection). And in a high-speed link, the speed of light (or usually around 30% of c for copper) becomes a real issue over long distances.

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    They are talking about fiber. Specifically the Metro Ethernet protocol over fiber or microwave'ed from a central fiber source. There is even legacy emulation (NxT1) over Metro Ethernet. There are timing solutions for 100% end to end Metro Ethernet.

    Sprint is slow in this. AT&T, T-mobile and Verizon are all running on upgraded Metro Ethernet. Sprint is dead last in Network Vision.

    There is even IP-RAN in which its 100% end to end IP which is what Network Vision does and sends the 1X voice carriers over virtualized QoS VoIP over Ethernet.

    Backhaul tech. is pretty advanced these days...

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    WAN technology aside, isn't the real problem in the provisioning of backhaul? I had understood that quite often Sprint and other smaller carriers would decide to order extra T1 or T3 backhaul but then have to wait for months and months while AT&T, Verizon, other ILEC's drag their feet to setup the T1's. They basically have no incentive to help improve Sprint's backhaul.

    So are there any such similar issues with this newer backhaul approaches or is Sprint still at the mercy of ILECs? (particularly in smaller metro, suburban and rural areas)

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    Noob question.. Fiber an option in this case ?

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    Not trying to hijack the thread but is this the same thing that Verizon is working on ?

    Verizon conducts trial to double fiber capacity using 200G between New York and Boston.

    Author: Jordan Hafford | Original Source
    Date: August 15, 2013

    Verizon just wrapped up a field trial that doubled the capacity of a fiber using 200G technology on a long-haul network segment between New York and Boston.

    Over the 260-mile segment, the trial demonstrated how to double spectral efficiency, therefore better supporting growth of wireless applications such as online video, 4G LTE and cloud services. It also reduced cost pair bit versus 100G technology.

    The trial utilized Ciena equipment to configure a Ciena Wavelogic3 coherent optical processor, the same equipment that it uses for its current 100G long-haul network and pre-production software.

    According to a recent Fierce Telecom article, the 16 QAM modulation on a single wavelength and 50 GHz spacing used in the trial were the two elements that allowed twice the amount of data to be encoded than can be with the current 100G.

    Verizon has been aggressive in deploying 100G technology in both long-haul and metro networks. And after installing 100G routes in parts of Europe, it announced last May that it was adding 100G optical capabilities into its global metro networks, and Ciena’s control-plane technology to simplify network management and reduce optical circuit provisioning time.

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    'Sprint enables 100G Ethernet wavelength services, sets path for 400G'


    Sprint (NYSE: S) continues to make progress with its own 100G optical path by completing two key trials of the technology on its wireline network.

    Working with its optical systems partner Ciena (Nasdaq: CIEN), the service provider deployed a 100G circuit over a 1,304-mile span in the United States and recently completed a live 400G trial.

    During its 100G circuit trial, which is now integrated into its network infrastructures and is in-service between Chicago and Fort Worth, Texas, it did not need to conduct regeneration between each point. Sprint said that being able to transmit at longer distance enables the service provider to reduce latency and increase reliability.

    The service provider said that the 100G technology it has deployed will enable it to achieve speeds up to 10X faster and, later, up to 40x faster without network upgrades. Its Ethernet Wave Services can provide 100G speeds now and 400G in the future.

    In its 400G trial in Silicon Valley, Sprint ran 400 Gbps channels alongside existing channels carrying live customer traffic. While it has not announced any specific date as to when it would need 400G, it said that it "foresees the opportunity to add a network equivalent of high-speed traffic lanes for customers with high-demand requirements."

    As previously reported, Sprint is upgrading its optical network backbone with Ciena's 6500 platform to support its Network Vision initiative.



    Read more: Sprint enables 100G Ethernet wavelength services, sets path for 400G - FierceTelecom http://www.fiercetelecom.com/story/s...#ixzz2c3azFvYP


    'Sprint reaches new milestones for network speed'

    Teaming with Ciena, Sprint demonstrates network readiness to support rapidly growing wireless and wireline data needs of customers

    OVERLAND PARK, Kan., and HANOVER, Md. — 08/15/2013

    Sprint (NYSE:S) and Ciena (NASDAQ: CIEN) have teamed to achieve two significant milestones in speed and capacity on Sprint's network:

    · Earlier this year, the companies trialed, and Sprint has since deployed, one of the longest 100 Gigabits-per-second (Gbps) circuits in the United States with a live transmission that required no signal regeneration over a distance of 2,100 km, or 1,304 miles.

    · Last month, the companies successfully completed a live 400Gbps trial on Sprint's network.

    The trials validate Sprint's leadership in deploying new network technologies designed to meet exponential growth in demand for data by Sprint business and consumer customers. This includes bandwidth-intensive cloud services and other applications like streaming HD video, telepresence and high-capacity data center connectivity.

    Until recently, the Sprint network offered wireline services at speeds of up to 10Gbps. The trials demonstrated the viability of using innovative technology to achieve speeds up to 10 times faster (and up to 40 times faster in the future), without requiring costly network upgrades to Sprint's robust fiber infrastructure. Sprint Ethernet Wave Services will support 100Gbps speeds now, and Sprint expects to leverage Ciena's coherent optical technology to support services operating at 400Gbps in the future.

    Key results from the two field trials:

    100Gbps: The 100Gbps circuit trialed earlier this year is now integrated into the Sprint optical network infrastructures and is in-serviced between Chicago and Fort Worth, Texas. The 100Gbps link uses Ciena WaveLogic 3 coherent optical processors on the 6500 Packet Optical Platform to enable Sprint to successfully transmit data at 100Gbps over the 2,100km (1,304-mile) circuit, with no regeneration of the signal at points in between. The longer distance between regeneration points provides reduced latency, hardware benefits and improved reliability, flexibility and performance for customers.

    400Gbps: This trial was performed in the Silicon Valley area using existing Sprint fiber infrastructure and Ciena's 6500 with WaveLogic 3 cards; this high-capacity link operated without error. This demonstrated the viability of using 400Gbps channels alongside existing channels carrying live customer traffic. As a result, Sprint foresees the opportunity to add a network equivalent of high-speed traffic lanes for customers with high-demand requirements.

    "Customers have expressed their hunger for higher speed networks to support their substantial data needs, which we project will only continue to grow exponentially," said Wayne Ward, vice president-Business and Product Development, Sprint. "The 400Gbps trial demonstrates our ability to offer higher speeds with our existing fiber, which means that our customers can feel assured that our network is future-proofed to meet their needs as they evolve. The delivery of 100Gbps and 400Gbps speeds will be critical as we launch our Ethernet Wave Services and support a growing wireless infrastructure."

    As announced in 2012, Sprint is upgrading its optical backbone network with Ciena's 6500 Packet-Optical Platform as part of its Network Vision initiative. The advanced network is expected to enable Sprint to enhance transport network scalability, cost and performance. By adding Ciena's coherent optical technology to the mix, Sprint can scale its core network initially to 40Gbps and 100Gbps, and later to 400Gbps and beyond, as network demands dictate.

    "Service providers are increasingly challenged to satisfy surging demand for bandwidth-hungry services and applications," said Francois Locoh-Donou, senior vice president-Global Products Group, Ciena. "Ciena's market-leading coherent technology offers the flexibility, programmability, scalability and cost-efficiency needed to meet these demands at 100Gbps speeds, 400Gbps speeds and beyond. These recent trials illustrate Sprint's ability to support high-speed data and significantly increase the traffic-carrying capacity of optical channels with no change to the underlying infrastructure – and that is a significant coup for any operator in this highly competitive market."



    Read more: Sprint reaches new milestones for network speed - FierceTelecom http://www.fiercetelecom.com/press-r...#ixzz2c3c0iTQw

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    Here's an article today on upgrades the 'Big 3' are doing:http://gigaom.com/2013/08/16/100g-20...dwidth-demand/

    Not to be outdone, Sprint has concluded a 400 Gbps trial using Ciena gear. The company conducted this trial in the Silicon Valley area on a live network. Earlier this year, Sprint trialed and deployed a 100 Gbps network (running between Chicago and Fort Worth, Texas) that required no regeneration of optical signal over a distance of 1,304 miles. Sprint is now looking at boosting its network to 400 Gbps, using Ciena’s Coherent Optical technologies.
    Last edited by 503ducati; 08-16-2013 at 12:07 PM.

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