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Thread: official T-Mobile USA LTE thread

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    official T-Mobile USA LTE thread

    Wirelessly posted (Samsung Galaxy Nexus: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_3; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.16 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0 Safari/533.16)

    This will replace the one has been locked.
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    official T-Mobile USA LTE thread

    Thanks for re-opening the thread.

    I'm excited for T-Mo LTE, coming from AT&T, it was frustrating to have LTE and capped data limits. It felt like having a race car, but only allowed to drive it 10 miles a month!

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    Cool, Thanks for making this thread and keep the LTE chat going.

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    Re: official T-Mobile USA LTE thread

    Thanks!

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using HowardForums

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    So... Starting off with something to talk about...

    The acquisition of MetroPCS will enable a sufficiently wide LTE channel in the Northeast, where T-Mobile is particularly deficient on PCS (and some places on AWS, like Fishkill, NY, where T-Mobile only has a single 2x5MHz AWS license). Acquiring MetroPCS will alleviate problem markets like these in the Northeast.

    What is slightly more interesting is that T-Mobile will acquire one Lower 700MHz license. It's an A block license that spans all of New Hampshire, two thirds of Massachusetts, a fifth of Connecticut, and all of Rhode Island. To date, it remains unused.

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    Great to see the thread back on! I'll post some useful stuff tonight.
    And also let's try to keep the mods informed of any unnecessary trolling or derailing as early as possible.
    Verizon Wireless 20Mhz FDD LTE

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    The thing that worries me with this acquisition, is that the new company will have a ton of debt, around $15 billion. That's almost the worth of the entire company! Not exactly an ideal situation for a company to grow.

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    Nothing in Vegas recently, another poster said he was able to connect using a solavei (sp?) APN?

    Don't know if that's true.

    Hopefully we hear something in March?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MetroPCS Definitive Proxy
    $15.0 Billion Notes to Refinance T-Mobile-Deutsche Telekom Intercompany Indebtedness, and up to $3.5 Billion Notes as Backstop for $2.5 Billion Wireless Credit Agreement Refinancing and $1.0 Billion Wireless New Notes

    The $15.0 billion notes will be issued by T-Mobile to Deutsche Telekom or a subsidiary of Deutsche Telekom pursuant to an indenture, which we refer to as the Deutsche Telekom notes indenture, containing the terms set forth in the description of notes attached as Exhibit G to the business combination agreement, as amended by the Deutsche Telekom notes letter agreement. The Deutsche Telekom notes will be unsecured. The Deutsche Telekom notes will be guaranteed by the combined company (the direct parent of T-Mobile following the transaction) and by all of T-Mobile’s wholly-owned domestic restricted subsidiaries (other than immaterial subsidiaries), all of T-Mobile’s restricted subsidiaries that guarantee certain of T-Mobile’s indebtedness, and any future subsidiary of the combined company that directly or indirectly owns any of T-Mobile’s equity interests.

    The $15.0 billion notes will have maturities ranging from six to eleven years. In addition, the $15.0 billion notes will be divided into (i) six series of senior unsecured notes having interest rates that remain constant through maturity, which we refer to as the non-reset notes, and (ii) six series of senior unsecured notes, one-third of which will be re-priced every six months, beginning two years after the date of issuance and ending three years after the date of issuance, which we refer to as the reset notes. The no-call period with respect to each series of non-reset notes will range from two to five years after the issuance thereof. The no-call period with respect to each series of reset notes will range from four to six years after the issuance thereof, or two or three years after the applicable reset date of such series. Each series of the $15.0 billion notes will be in a principal amount of $1.25 billion. In addition, to the extent Deutsche Telekom purchases the $2.5 billion notes or the $1.0 billion notes, which we refer to, collectively, as the additional notes (described further below), such notes will be divided equally into non-reset notes and reset notes, and will have maturities varying between three and eight years.

    Both the reset notes and non-reset notes will be priced at the closing of the transaction, and the reset notes will be re-priced at the applicable time, according to a formula, the first component of which is a reference yield which is based upon (i) three indices of high-yield bonds issued by telecommunications companies (50% weight (or 2/3s weight, if qualifying securities of the type described in either (but not both) of the following clauses (ii) and (iii) are not available at the time of calculation, or 100% weight, if qualifying securities of the type described in both of the following clauses (ii) and (iii) are not available at the time of calculation)), (ii) the prices of comparable bonds issued by Sprint Nextel Corporation or any successor or assign thereof (25% weight (or 1/3 weight, if qualifying securities of the type described in the following clause (iii) are not available at the time of calculation or zero weight if qualifying securities of the type described in this clause (ii) are not available at the time of calculation)) and (iii) the prices of Wireless securities (25% weight (or 1/3 weight, if qualifying securities of the type described in the previous clause (ii) are not available at the time of calculation or zero weight if qualifying securities of the type described in this clause (iii) are not available at the time of calculation)), all as of the applicable time (and provided that the yield of each index, bond or other qualifying security shall be increased (or decreased) for purposes of this calculation by 12.5 basis points per year, calculated to the day, by which the effective tenor of such index, bond or security (calculated as the tenor resulting in the yield to worst) is less than (or greater than) eight years. The reference yield will then be adjusted as follows: (1) plus 100 basis points for reset notes or 187.5 basis points for non-reset notes, (2) plus or minus 12.5 basis points per year, calculated to the day, by which the remaining tenor of the series of notes being repriced is longer or shorter than eight years; (3) plus a distribution fee of 200 basis points (spread in the coupon based upon the tenor of the applicable note).

    The Deutsche Telekom notes indenture will contain customary events of default, covenants and other terms, including, among other things, covenants that restrict the ability of the issuer and its subsidiaries to, inter alia, pay dividends and make certain other restricted payments, incur indebtedness and issue preferred stock, create liens on assets, sell or otherwise dispose of assets, enter into transactions with affiliates and enter new lines of business, all as described in the description of notes attached as Exhibit G to the business combination agreement. These covenants include certain customary baskets, exceptions and incurrence-based ratio tests. The Deutsche Telekom notes indenture will not contain any financial maintenance covenants.

    Pursuant to an agreement to be entered into by T-Mobile and Deutsche Telekom on the closing date and described on Exhibit J to the business combination agreement, Deutsche Telekom, as holder of the Deutsche Telekom notes, will have certain special rights, and will be subject to certain special restrictions, that do not apply to other holders of those notes, including among other things (i) a more broadly defined change in control put right, (ii) restrictions on its ability to tender Deutsche Telekom notes into a change in control offer following a change in control resulting from a transfer of common stock of T-Mobile by Deutsche Telekom unless all holders of common stock are required or entitled to participate on the same terms, (iii) a right to consent to equity issuances the proceeds of which would be used to redeem notes held by Deutsche Telekom, and (iv) a right to consent to any redemption of the Deutsche Telekom notes held by Deutsche Telekom with the proceeds of any equity issuance by T-Mobile or the combined company.
    This very complex language seems to state that the notes, being unsecured, are guaranteed by the credit of the company itself. The gist of it appears to be that the notes are long-term, maturing at least at the end of the decade, or further out. This means that the $15 billion notes don't have to be paid off all at once or mostly right away. T-Mobile is betting that its recent work to embrace MVNOs, MVNEs, B2B, enterprises, and M2M will provide it with enough cash at the end of each payment period to pay them off. These notes are probably the result of Deutsche Telekom partially divesting itself of T-Mobile USA. That being said, it's entirely possible that some of these notes are part of the debt that Deutsche Telekom assumed when it acquired VoiceStream Wireless 10 years ago. T-Mobile USA, being technically a privately-owned company, was never required to divulge the internal debt it incurred when using Deutsche Telekom money to keep the business running. Now it has to disclose that information.

    It's interesting that Deutsche Telekom is using the Sprint-Nextel Corporation as a marker for the value of the notes for the reset point. Not entirely sure why, but it seems like Deutsche Telekom is aiming to use Sprint's performance as number 3 as a good indicator against T-Mobile. If T-Mobile surpasses Sprint, then the value of the notes will fall and T-Mobile has to repay even less. This performance-based marker motivates the team to work to quickly surpass Sprint and maintain the lead.

    While the $15 billion is worrying, it is a good sign that it's all with Deutsche Telekom. Deutsche Telekom can choose to "forgive" some of the debt arbitrarily in order to improve the financial goodwill between T-Mobile USA and Deutsche Telekom. Additionally, the notes act as a constraint of Deutsche Telekom, forcing them to keep with T-Mobile USA and really work at improving the company. This was almost certainly included on the insistance of the MetroPCS executives and the board.


    Quote Originally Posted by MetroPCS Definitive Proxy
    $2.5 Billion to Refinance Wireless Credit Agreement

    It is currently contemplated that the $2.5 billion notes will be issued and the proceeds will be used to pay off the approximately $2.5 billion in principal amount of indebtedness, which we refer to as the credit agreement refinancing, currently owed by Wireless under the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated as of March 17, 2011, among Wireless, as Borrower, the Guarantors party thereto, the Lenders from time to time parties thereto, and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Administrative Agent, as modified by the Incremental Commitment Agreement, dated as of May 10, 2011 and as further amended and restated, supplemented or modified from time to time, which we refer to as the Wireless existing senior credit facility. Wireless, in consultation with Deutsche Telekom, is permitted to offer and sell permitted Wireless notes in an amount sufficient for the credit agreement refinancing at any time prior to the closing of the transaction. In the event that the credit agreement refinancing has not been consummated for the full principal amount of the Wireless existing senior credit facility indebtedness on or prior to the closing of the transaction, Deutsche Telekom will purchase additional Deutsche Telekom notes at the closing of the transaction in an amount necessary to repay the Wireless existing senior credit facility in full, up to a maximum amount of $2.5 billion. Any additional Deutsche Telekom notes would be issued under the Deutsche Telekom notes indenture described above with the maturities and pricing described above.

    Deutsche Telekom will be entitled to a commitment fee, payable by T-Mobile within one business day after the closing of the transaction, equal to 150 basis points of the $2.5 billion Deutsche Telekom commitment amount; provided that T-Mobile, as the wholly-owned subsidiary of the combined company following the transaction, will be entitled to a fee reduction equal to (1) 100 basis points of the amount of Deutsche Telekom’s commitment that is reduced with proceeds from the issuance of permitted Wireless notes, which we refer to as the take-out proceeds, within four and one-half months after pro forma financial statements giving effect to the transaction are available (which pro forma financials shall be deemed to be available after this proxy statement is filed in definitive form with the SEC) or (2) 50 basis points of the amount of Deutsche Telekom’s commitment that is reduced with take-out proceeds between four and one-half months and seven and one-half months following the availability of the pro forma financials.
    This is pretty standard. Deutsche Telekom is buying out all of MetroPCS' debt and paying it off. In turn, the $2.5 billion of debt that Deutsche Telekom pays off will be included in the $15 billion of notes issued by Deutsche Telekom to the merged entity. Any additional debt that Deutsche Telekom has to pay off will be added on top of the $15 billion. If there's less than $2.5 billion of debt, then the $15 billion goes down. They did this for the VoiceStream+Omnipoint acquisition to create T-Mobile in the first place. It's quite likely that the debt will go down at least a little bit because MetroPCS is cash positive right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by MetroPCS Definitive Proxy
    $1.0 Billion Wireless New Notes

    In addition, the business combination agreement permits Wireless or its direct parent company, in consultation with Deutsche Telekom, to issue up to $1.0 billion of additional permitted Wireless notes prior to the closing of the transaction. In the event that the $1.0 billion notes are not sold to third party investors by the closing of the transaction or are sold to third party investors in an aggregate principal amount of less than $1.0 billion, Deutsche Telekom will purchase additional Deutsche Telekom notes at the closing of the transaction in an amount equal to such shortfall. Any additional Deutsche Telekom notes would be issued under the Deutsche Telekom notes indenture described above with the maturities and pricing described above. It is currently anticipated that the proceeds of the $1.0 billion notes will be used for general corporate purposes.

    Deutsche Telekom will be entitled to a commitment fee, payable by T-Mobile within one business day after the closing of the transaction, equal to 150 basis points of the $1.0 billion Deutsche Telekom commitment amount; provided that T-Mobile, as the wholly-owned subsidiary of the combined company following the transaction, will be entitled to a fee reduction equal to (1) 100 basis points of the amount of Deutsche Telekom’s commitment that is reduced with take-out proceeds within nine months after the signing of the business combination agreement or (2) 50 basis points of the amount of Deutsche Telekom’s commitment that is reduced with take-out proceeds between nine and twelve months after the signing of the business combination agreement.
    So this means that the MetroPCS can issue up to $1 billion of unsecured notes to raise funding prior to the closing of the deal. If these notes are not all sold off before closing, then Deutsche Telekom will buy them and raise the amount of notes issued to the new company. However, that would be bad. If Deutsche Telekom winds up buying any of that, then merged entity is on the hook to pay 15% of the commitment amount back to Deutsche Telekom on the second business day of operation.


    Personally, I'm not too worried about the $15 billion. What I'm worried about is the additional $1 billion. MetroPCS needs to ensure that there's high confidence among those in the debt markets that the company participates in, so that those notes are bought right away. Of course, if MetroPCS doesn't issue the additional $1 billion of notes, then we're safe too.

    With the large economic scale and powerful LTE network (and a broad high-speed mobile network, hopefully), all it takes is improved brand perception and a lot more subscribers. If the merged entity can take people away from Sprint-Nextel and AT&T in large enough numbers per quarter, then it will be a wonderful success.

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    Wirelessly posted (Samsung Galaxy Nexus: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_3; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.16 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0 Safari/533.16)

    I am trying to get in deep info of NYC, but it looks like reps other than in Herald Square who said in July, nobody else doesn't have clue. Even HSPA is still decent right now, LTE will give big help for increaaing capacity for sharply increasing of customers in NYC.
    Last edited by matt.mingkee; 02-27-2013 at 05:39 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottish Skyedance View Post
    Wirelessly posted (Samsung Galaxy Nexus: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_3; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.16 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0 Safari/533.16)

    I am trying to get in deep info of NYC, but it looks like reps other than in Herald Square who said in July, nobody else doesn't have clue. Even HSPA is still decent right now, LTE will give big help for increaaing capacity for sharply increasing of customers in NYC.
    New York City is a T-Mobile market suffering from unfortunate consequences. When AT&T Wireless and Cingular Wireless merged to become AT&T Mobility, Cingular took the half of the PCS spectrum for New York that T-Mobile and Cingular was sharing. That caused a massive constraint on capacity. That's why when UMTS was deployed there, it was deployed voice only initially. The voice capacity was way too low with just PCS.

    Currently, T-Mobile holds a license for AWS E block (10MHz) and AWS F block (20MHz) in New York City. It holds 10MHz of the A block of PCS and the whole PCS D block (10MHz).

    The reason the rep probably told you July is because with the acquisition of MetroPCS, T-Mobile gains control of the AWS C block (10MHz) and the AWS D block (10MHz). MetroPCS CDMA operations would be shifted down to the AWS C block and HSPA+ would be shifted to AWS D and E blocks. AWS F block would be used for LTE, giving T-Mobile the option of increasing LTE capacity with the shift of HSPA+ on AWS E block to PCS or eliminating CDMA2000 for AWS C block and shifting HSPA+ operations down to AWS C and D.

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    That's definitely one of the options here, although we aren't sure how are they gonna configure MetroPCS CDMA and LTE within 10Mhz C block. Their subscriber base in NYC is fairly large, I'd like to know if they'll have even worse capacity constrains.

    They could also deploy 2x5Mhz LTE on E block, and keep HSPA+42 on F, although I'd love to see 2x10Mhz LTE deployed in F block from the get go, and shifting HSPA+42 to block E as HSPA+21.

    PCS HSPA+21 is already good to go. I'm dying to see what configuration they'll chose...

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    Quote Originally Posted by milan03 View Post
    That's definitely one of the options here, although we aren't sure how are they gonna configure MetroPCS CDMA and LTE within 10Mhz C block. Their subscriber base in NYC is fairly large, I'd like to know if they'll have even worse capacity constrains.

    They could also deploy 2x5Mhz LTE on E block, and keep HSPA+42 on F, although I'd love to see 2x10Mhz LTE deployed in F block from the get go, and shifting HSPA+42 to block E as HSPA+21.

    PCS HSPA+21 is already good to go. I'm dying to see what configuration they'll chose...
    T-Mobile simply deploy F block for HSPA and E block for LTE. Once MetroPCS joined, T-Mobile simply bind up D+E (though the company has to do some cellsite work) and leave C block alone for time being.
    In addition, both companies should consider deploying LTE Calling (VoLTE) for better entire system integration, and this will help MetroPCS customers with CDMA+LTE phones with LTE Calling.
    In addition, T-Mobile should provide UMTS devices for free with CDMA device trade-in to speed up CDMA->HSPA transition.

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    Re: official T-Mobile USA LTE thread

    Have we found out if vegas is 2*5 or 2*10?

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using HowardForums

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    Quote Originally Posted by milan03
    a buggy Nexus 4 network scan and listing of AT&T in LTE Only Mode in Vegas and NYC (markets where AT&T has zero AWS licenses)
    There's nothing "buggy" about the Nexus 4 network scan. The device has the ability to detect AT&T's band 17, 700Mhz LTE network.

    As AnandTech found in it's teardown, the device has the Qualcomm MDM9215M, its third generation 28nm Category 3 LTE multimode baseband, and a WTR1605L transceiver. They said that it also had the software stack both in Android and inside the AMSS on the MDM9215M.

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6474/n...-on-band-4-aws

    What it doesn't have is the power amplifier for band 17. So attempts to use the device on AT&T's band 17 network have not been successful. However, it can still detect the network.

    But detecting the AT&T LTE network is a minor point. The main value of the device is to detect the T-Mobile LTE network. Further tests conducted in Las Vegas this week have found that in some instances, the T-Mobile LTE network is found in some areas where the AT&T network is not. In addition, T-Mobile may have superior interior casino coverage. Deep inside the MGM grand, for example, AT&T was nowhere to be found, whereas T-Mobile and MetroPCS were still detected.

    Some have suggested that T-Mobile will follow a similar market sequence of upgrading to LTE that they did with PCS. So those living in cities at the top of that sequence such as Baltimore, Houston and Washington D.C, are encouraged to use the Nexus 4 to see if T-Mobile has LTE up and running in your city.

    The procedure is simple:

    Dial *#*#4636#*#* to enter the Testing menu.
    Select Phone information
    Set preferred network type to LTE only
    Then leave and go into the phone's settings menu
    Select More...
    Select Mobile networks
    Select Network operators

    Then the Nexus 4 will search and list all of the Available networks that it sees. Here's a screenshot from the device in Vegas that shows it detecting LTE networks for T-Mobile, AT&T and MetroPCS:

    Name:  Screenshot_2013-02-22-00-29.png
Views: 18588
Size:  34.8 KB

    One other thing is that the latest update including Android 4.2.2 will disable the ability to go into LTE Only mode. If you have already updated, check out XDA on how to flash the old radio to regain LTE Only.

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