Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 35

Thread: Considering move to Andriod from iOS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    22
    Carrier(s)
    Rogers
    Feedback Score
    0

    Considering move to Andriod from iOS

    Hello,

    I have been using an iPhone for the past 5 years and use it mainly as a phone and email server. I rarely use apps, but when I do, they are usually a pretty general and simplified app.

    As I am not overly impressed with the recent update to iOS7, I am giving consideration to moving away from the restrictive and structured world of Apple and into the more exciting world of JellyBean or KitKat.

    Since Apple only offers 1 model of phone at any given time, I am at a bit of a loss trying to find a good phone which I can use and enjoy for at least 2 years......what should I look at as a potential replacement for my iPhone 4?

    Should I look at the new Nexus, a Note 3, Samsung S4, G2 or something else????

    Help me!! I am lost in a world of choices.
    Last edited by yellowGTS; 11-01-2013 at 06:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,582
    Device(s)
    Samsung U430 (fully functioinal bluetooth)
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    How about starting with location/carrier?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    22
    Carrier(s)
    Rogers
    Feedback Score
    0
    Sorry about that.....

    I am located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Carrier is Rogers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    531
    Device(s)
    OnePlus One 64GB
    Carrier(s)
    Fido
    Feedback Score
    0
    in my opinion grab yourself a Nexus 5. You'll have an awesome experience of android the way it was meant to be!

    I got on the way btw!
    $50 Unlimited local calling + Unlimited LD US/Canada + Unlimited TXT US/Canada
    $30 6Gb Smartphone Data Plan
    $14 Value pack

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    22
    Carrier(s)
    Rogers
    Feedback Score
    0
    I have heard a few stories about reliability and quality of LG phones....is that something I should be worried about if I look to buy a Nexus 5?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    17
    Feedback Score
    0
    On Nov 6 I retired my original iphone for a Nexus 5 and have been so excited by the revolutionary changes I've been laying awake part of the night and my hands are shaking sometimes since then. Today I went on an amazing bike ride while a sweet female voice from google maps added voice suggestions for turns into my headphones. I will even be able to do this in the rain with my phone tucked safely inside my raingear. The screen can be off while riding so this should extend battery life. When I purposely missed turns it recorrected perfectly. After I ate at the restaurant all I had to do was say OK google- directions home- and it unobtrusively told me how to get home with minimal disruption to my favorite internet radio station- Radio Paradise. The voice search unfortunately doesn't yet have voice answers so I had to hit 2 clicks on the screen before the voice redirected me home. Maybe next year android will be updated to allow voice search to create new trips without any screen input. One voice search for a certain restaurant pulled up a screen for a funeral home with a similar sounding name so be careful.
    You can read my post in the HF MetroPCS forum about my very positive experience with N5 on them. I got 25MB down and 10MB up in another part of town today so I'm very happy.
    I was an Apple fanboy the first few years after iphone came out but they have been going in the wrong direction since then. I never liked their big brother restrictions about what parts of the internet I could access and I'm not just talking about pornography which I never look at anyway. There were free internet movies I could watch on my computer but Apple and ATT would only let me watch movies on my iphone if I paid for them. Apple store is always try to sell things you can get for free on Android. Free Google maps is the best for navigation and the only one with Street View and Transit directions and bike directions that I use all the time. Kit Kat has integrated all these things so beautifully that Apple and IOS are now obsolete.
    This afternoon I went joyriding all over San Diego to celebrate my new found freedom. The transit directions were fantastic but I was dissappointed the phone didn't talk to me during transit. I was hoping it would do things like tell me what stop to get off but at least I could see on the screen when to pull the stop requested cord as I approached the end of each leg of the trip. I'll bet that in 6 months or a year the transit directions will be updated with voice directions.
    It was fun to see what a vast improvement the Radio Paradise android app is over the iphone app I had been using. Now I can get on screen lyrics and information about the song or band or even a beautiful slideshow of pictures with a theme related to the song. I had been doing that on my computer at home but now I can do it on the bus. I'm so glad I gave my car to my grandaughter so now I can enjoy my music visually and viscerally through headphones while relaxing on the bus or trolley instead of stressing in isolation while cooped up in a car fighting traffic.
    I am going to write a review for my nexus 5 as soon as I figure out how to post a review. I couldn't find a post new tread button at the bottom of the review section so I have submitted a question as to how to do that. I am a HF newbie.
    I forgot to add that during my 4.5 hour transit adventure my battery dropped from full charge to 48%. That ride used 143MB data. I was streaming internet radio and navigating and using the screen most of the time. Battery usage was 39% maps- 39% screen-2% phone idle- but only 3% was the radio paradise app. I had left wifi on by mistake and that used 3%. Four one minute phone calls used 2%.
    Nexus 5 has new tech for low battery usage for audio so I 'm hopeful I can go for long musical rides with my screen off especially on rides where I don't need directions. I may need to use my booster battery or use my solar panel on the rear rack of my bike on all day touring rides that need google maps on constantly.
    The ability to update is extremely important. My original iphone continually got upgrades for the first 3 years that made it faster and gave it totally new features like location by triangulating the location from cell towers even though it did not have GPS. This allowed for the creation of a local map button on google maps that was invaluable. Apple gave up on updating the original iphone after 3 years so then it started to slide into absolescence. IOS gets heavier with each update and is geared toward elites and high end phones.
    I will never buy anything but Nexus because Nexus phones have the best chance of getting updates for the 6 years I plan to keep this phone. Android is going in the right direction by keeping android light so it can run on older and mass market phones with 512 K made for the world market.
    Nexus phone updates avoid the dual problems of getting your updates through a carrier. The immediate problem is frustrating update delays but the bigger issue is carriers and manufacturers give up on all updates for any particular phone after about 3 years. Android dropped the ball on Galaxy Nexus update to Kit Kat but they have their game on now and I think I will be able to get quick updates directly from Google or the hacking community for 6 years.
    Only Google still has love for older Nexus phones because they are the only company that can still make money off of upgrades for old phones through their ad income. Money drives updates.
    The other thing that makes the Nexus 5 more futureproof is the ability to run on ATT and T-mobile and Sprint networks to give you maximum choice of carrier prepaid plans and MNVO's for flexibilty and saving big bucks without any contract tying you down.
    I almost bought the Nexus 4 but lack of LTE meant it was not futureproof enough for me because even LTE will be phasing out beyond 6 years. The carriers are always cannibalizing bandwidth to reassign to newer and faster bandwidth. Anything less than LTE will be gone sooner.
    Forget Apple. Android is the revolution and it is here now!
    Last edited by oakhill; 11-08-2013 at 11:28 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    295
    Carrier(s)
    Koodo
    Feedback Score
    0
    As has already been said, the LG Nexus 5 is an impressive phone. The Motorola Moto X is also an amazing device. The Moto X does all the Nexus 5 does and little bit more. I did a lot of online research and hands on testing before I bought the Moto X and I honestly think it and the Nexus 5 are the two best bang-for-your-buck Android phones on the market right now. Both are reasonably priced and neither is a low quality budget phone. Both are top notch. I almost waited for a Nexus 5 but had to purchase a new phone right away. The Moto X and Nexus 5 are so close in capabilities they're almost like twins. You can really tell Google had a major hand in designing and engineering them both. They both run a form of pure stock Android. The Moto X has a few more voice activated capabilities but the Nexus 5 has a slightly larger screen. The Nexus 5 has KitKat 4.4 now while the Moto X will get it in an over the air or online update in a few weeks. I honestly think they are the two best phones on the market right now and any purchaser would be well pleased with either one.

    As for Lucky Goldstar's and Motorola's past quality issues? Google isn't in the business of losing money and I don't think they will let those two manufacturers go down that road again on Google's watch. Motorola is now owned by Google and LG will do as Google tells it to if they want to keep manufacturing Nexus branded mobile devices.

    Both the Nexus 5 and the Moto X are available from cell service carriers for $450 - $500. The Google Play online store is selling the Nexus 5 directly for $350 - $400 and Republic Wireles in the US is or will soon be selling the Moto X for use on it's and Sprint's networks for $300. I'm not sure if Republic's Moto X will work on Canadian networks but I know AT&T's model XT-1058 will, as it is the same one sold up here by Rogers/Fido and I know for a fact that one will work on Telus/Koodo and also probably on Bell/Virgin.

    phonedog and mobiletechreview both have some in depth and informative video reviews on YouTube of both those devices and more.

    Good luck with your purchase and please come back and post to tell us which one you bought and why.

    Enjoy. :-)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,582
    Device(s)
    Samsung U430 (fully functioinal bluetooth)
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    @oakhill, thanks for post.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,948
    Feedback Score
    0
    I also made the switch from iOS to Android. I originally used Android and thought it to be sub par when it first hit the market and chose iOS for years. I grew tired of iOS and the latest version didn't help boost my confidence in the boring OS. I chose to leave Verizon with a iPhone 5 and come to AT&T with a Moto X.... haven't had a regret yet. Both the carrier and device are excellent in my opinion. Google seems to be firing on all accords as Android has changed drastically from what I remember. And I'm sure 4.4 and eventually ART will solidify my thinking that Android will be just as smooth as iOS.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    4
    Feedback Score
    0
    if I move from I touch to a droid phone is the a way to move my contacts ALL name numbers and the notes into a contacts area or I am doomed? next questions for page plus which droid phone should i get?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    561
    Device(s)
    iPhone 6
    Carrier(s)
    Rogers
    Feedback Score
    0
    Not the most objective forum to ask this question. I'm going to be the dissenting voice:

    Consider sticking with iPhones. (Specifically, the iPhone 5s.)

    You use your phone primarily for calling and email. Most of Android's flexibility won't be useful to you; a straightforward interface will be. I'm also not sure that you'll get the two years of longevity that you want, since many Android OEMs drop OS update support very quickly (usually within a year). You really have to get a Nexus from Google to get two years.

    If you do go Android, I'd probably get either a Nexus 5 or a Moto X. What special features they have are more likely to be useful day-to-day than the gimmicks from Samsung and, to some extent, HTC. The Moto X has the most practical features, like hands-free voice control and Active Display, but it's non-stock (and therefore likely to be abandoned quickly).

    Also, please give the interfaces for both Android and iOS an honest to goodness try on modern hardware before you commit... preferably without a sales rep standing over your shoulder. They'll frequently try to scare you away from platforms they don't use, and overstate the value of platforms they do. It'll be even better if you can borrow something outside of a store environment.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    17
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by adamsbattlestar View Post
    if I move from I touch to a droid phone is the a way to move my contacts ALL name numbers and the notes into a contacts area or I am doomed? next questions for page plus which droid phone should i get?
    i agree with everything in Aurelian's response. I am reeling and still losing sleep after 7 days dealing with the very difficult learning curve in my transition from original iphone to Nexus 5. Moments of absolute euphoria have alternated with the depths of extreme frustration. I am still carrying my no service iphone as my calendar because I haven't gotten around to learning how to tranfer my calendars because there are so many other higher priority challenges. I haven't yet figured out how to send a text because hangouts is such a challenge. I consider myself an old school geek but this is a big challenge at age 64.

    I would only recommend the switch to smartphone savvy geeks willing to devote a lot of time to the transition.
    I would recommend a Nexus 5 for any geeks buying their very first smartphone because if you are going to learn a new OS Android is better now and will win in the long run.

    I would recommend iphone for people who are challenged by or adverse to technology. Like Aurelian said the iphone is more straight forward and simpler for people that won't use Android's complexity and power. A cruder way to say that would be that Iphone is better for dummies.

    I would recommend that anyone thinking about getting an Android phone should open a Google account on their computer long before they get the phone. This would enable them to open and become familiar with gmail, maps, calendar, U-tube and other basic Google accounts. One account covers everything Google. When they get around to buying an Android phone all those accounts will automatically be on both their phone and computer as soon as they enter their gmail address and password into the phone.
    I had done this years ago and I still find my transition overwhelming. It takes a huge amount of work to research and set up all your privacy settings and learn the Google ecosystem and the way everything integrates. Even a geek might be overwhelmed in starting out cold with Android if they simultaneously had to set up and learn how to use all the Google ecosystem and learn a new phone at the same time. Average people are even more likely to be overwhelmed and unhappy.

    I would not recommend switching from iOS or Blackberry to Android during times when anyone is very busy or going through major life transitions.
    Seven days ago I was enjoying a relaxed retirement in paradise when my Nexus 5 arrived.
    Five days later I was such a wreck I did not even enjoy my Saturday dance group that is normally the highlight of my week. I was so confused, disoriented and sleep deprived I did not dance well or enjoy myself.
    I'm getting my feet back on the ground now and still believe I made the right decision to go with the amazing Nexus 5.
    If I had been stressed to start with the iOS to Android transition would have definitely put me over the top.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    295
    Carrier(s)
    Koodo
    Feedback Score
    0
    Aurelian has some good points.

    In that iOS7 might still be a better fit for you unless you're inclined to learning to use a new operating system. And no disrespect to anyone but Android isn't that difficult to learn. I've had my Moto X for a month and a half now and while I'm still exploring all the things it can do, I've had to learn Android from scratch and haven't had any problems with it. In fact, I've been looking at it as an adventure. If I ever get tired of the fun, I'll get myself a copy of "Android for Dummies" and then I'll know all there is to know. But that might be kind of boring.

    I also agree that the Nexus 5 and Moto X are the current cutting edge phones. The Nexus 5 uses raw processor power to get the job done while the Moto X is engineered to work well with a specially designed lower powered processor and other components which makes it's battery last longer. Two different methods of accomplishing the same task and each has it's advantages. And the both do it at an attractive price.

    I do however disagree with the idea that Google will be dropping support for pre Nexus 5 phones any time soon. The reason being that Android 4.4 Kit Kat is optimised for phones with lower powered processors and will make such phones run faster and better. There will however be a cut off point as I've heard phones like the Samsung Galaxy Nexus will not be getting the 4.4 update.

    I also disagree that the Moto X is likely to be abandoned quickly. Motorola is owned by Google and in fact Google had a major hand it the engineering of the Moto X. And while it's flavour of Android may not be as pure as on the Nexus 5, I think it's as uncluttered as you're likely to get outside of a Nexus branded device. Google didn't get to where they are now by being in the business of losing money, so it's highly unlikely they will be pushing Motorola or the Moto X under the bus any time soon.

    Enjoy. :-)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    17
    Feedback Score
    0
    Most of the stress I have been having from switching from iOS 3.1.1 all the way up to Kit Kat revolves around the privacy and location settings and interactions between apps in Kit Kat.
    I don't just click these settings without researching and pondering the ins and outs so this is what has been stressing me out.

    When I started with the original iOS in 2007 it felt safe and easy. There was no exact location because it did not have GPS. Even after I made the last possible upgrade to 3.1.1 in 2010 there was still no multitasking.
    Apps did not interact with each other or share such huge amounts of information with the NSA and advertisers.
    Maybe I was naive but privacy and security issues were not in my face like they are today.

    Kit Kat feels very dangerous like I am in a mine field with barbed wire all around.
    I am concerned with questions like is my mother going to know what movie I watched?
    Will my friends see my name and photo hawking junk in pop up ads?
    Will the brain police arrest me someday because my phone told them I had been to an anti-war protest if I'm not cautious enough with the settings in my apps?
    Initial euphoria is being restrained by doubt and nagging concerns.

    If I had been coming from iOS7 I would have already learned to navigate those perils because it has similar issues.
    In the past week I have had to agonize over thousands of such small decisions. That is why I have been challenged by the idea of using Hangouts to text. I want to research Hangout implications before I dive in.
    Thanks to those of you who have suggested alternative text apps.

    Any one of those decisions is not particularly stressful but they have added up. The total stress comes from the challenge not just to my intelligence but also to my psychology and philosophy.

    This is related to the topic because the point I am trying to make is that switching from older to newer when you switch OS's adds to the challenge.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    123
    Carrier(s)
    Sprint
    Feedback Score
    0
    Oakhill,

    My 65 year old tech illiterate mother bought an android and figured out how to do everything you are having problems with in the course of just picking up the phone. Then again she didn't have to unlearn the way Apple MAKES you do things. There is a transition time coming from IOS but that is just because you are use to doing it without thinking anymore. Now you have to think about how to do those things but within about 3-4 weeks you will have most the common uses back to second nature and after about 6-8 weeks you will wonder why the hell Apple didn't do it this way. It is a learning curve just like you had when you first got your Iphone. It is no steeper with the Android than with IOS. Anyone that says android is more difficult to learn the basic functions on has no idea what they are talking about or can talk to my mother and she can talk them through how to text.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 25
    Last Post: 01-11-2013, 11:58 AM
  2. Considering moving to MetroPCS from Sprint
    By fastsvo in forum MetroPCS
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-30-2012, 01:24 PM
  3. Considering the move to S60 from WM5
    By alphaivt in forum Symbian/S60
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-30-2007, 03:55 AM
  4. Considering move from T730 to i600
    By burtonman in forum Verizon Wireless
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-08-2004, 11:19 PM
  5. [NZ] Telecom considers moving from CDMA to GSM/UMTS
    By KiwiSurfer in forum General Mobile Questions and Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-06-2003, 11:42 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks