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Thread: Why did you choose Cricket as your mobile carrier?

  1. #1
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    Why did you choose Cricket as your mobile carrier?

    I was an AT&T postpaid customer for 15 years (originally Bellsouth Mobility, Cingular Wireless and then AT&T Wireless). In April 2014, I received yet another overage with my AT&T plan. I had three lines on my account (my wife, my mother and myself) and we shared 2 GB of data. It seemed that each month we were doing well with data usage until the last few days where we suddenly went over. I was hit with a $15 overage each month and I just couldn't take it anymore. When the new Cricket Wireless went live in May 2014 we made the switch. I purchased SIM cards from an eBay seller who basically gave two months + SIM card for $40. It was a great deal at the time. I switched my mother over shortly afterwards using the $100 port in credit from T-Mobile (I temporarily switched her to T-Mobile to take advantage of this).

    Since then, I've started my own group with 5 lines @ 2.5 GB high speed each and pay $100/mo. At $20/mo per line it's a great deal for me. Is Cricket perfect? Absolutely not, but for our needs you can't go wrong given the price point.

    I will point out I work in the IT field and I'm very savy with cell phones, swapping SIM cards, activating service, etc. I've helped many people switch to Cricket but understand it isn't the easiest process for some. I will say that Cricket might not be for everyone. My in-laws, for example, choose to stay with AT&T because they enjoy the option of financing their phones with AT&T Next. I've given up trying to convince them otherwise as it will probably save me a lot of headaches in the long run

  2. #2
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    I had always just had Sprint and then Boost, both of which were pathetic for data, but I didn't know any better until I started reading HoFo.

    I ported my Boost line to Aio in April of 2014 and never looked back. Even then it was a great value because I finally had data that worked!

  3. #3
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    My wife was on T-Mobile $30 100 min/unlimited texts/5GB plan and every other month or so, she'd go over the 100 minutes and had to pay per minute after that. So last year, she switched to Cricket $35 plan for the better reception and the $100 switch credit.

    My wife's parents were on T-Mobile post paid and they took advantage of the switch credit of $300 (for 3 lines) and $25 after rebate Moto G phone and now they're saving over $60 per month.

    My brother-in-law just recently switched from Mothership AT&T plan, paying well over $100 for a single line to the $50 Cricket plan.

  4. #4
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    I was with Verizon for over 20 years and then Pageplus for 3. Two reasons I switched to Cricket: $35.00 a month including tax and now I don't have to stand outside at the cabin to make a call. I would probably still be with Verizon/PP if I got coverage at the cabin.

  5. #5
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    My family left Verizon (after many years) to save money. The signal is great on Cricket. I truly believe phone calls are clearer on Cricket than was on Verizon. We are not big data users. Netflix maybe. No gamers. We left Verizon starting last spring. I dont think I will ever go back to Verizon.

  6. #6
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    I've used Net10, US Cellular, AT&T, and Verizon in the past. They all worked fine but wanted to bail on high post pay contracts and try out Cricket. Gave it a shot a couple months ago and since then switched the entire family. Glad I did - good pricing structure and service has been good. I recommend them to friends when they ask.
    ----
    Joe

  7. #7
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    Was previously on T-Mobile pre-paid with old dumb phones years ago, and with the advent of smartphones moved onto Virgin Mobile. At the time, the price/value couldn't be beat - I picked up (3) Kyocera Rise phones on a Thanksgiving sale for $20 each, and set them up with the $35 plan. The wife talked more, so she moved to the $45 plan. Coverage was acceptable and things were fine - $115 a month for 3 lines with limitations and I owned the phones.

    In 2014 when Cricket was bought by AT&T and started the $100 port-in credit promotion, it was worth a look. I could get unlimited talk/text and more high-speed data and it would net down to $90/mo for my 3 lines - but I would have to get new phones.

    My in-laws were downsizing and moving from two phones to one. They were on T-Mobile and paying $80/mo for those 2 lines. When I told them that we could net down to $20 a month if we combined all our lines. They agreed, and their second line would go to my younger son.

    Went to Walmart and picked up (4) Moto E Gen1 phones for $50 each (consider what we were coming from - no need to debate the Moto E's merits or lack thereof) and a BYOD SIM for the refurb Nexus 4 that I picked up for $150. Total outlay $360.

    Created my Cricket account and started with my BYOD SIM & Nexus 4, then each Moto E. Within 90 minutes, I now had (5) lines on Cricket and paid $100 for the first month's service. Total outlay $460. Received a total of $500 in credits, and essentially got 5 months of service for free. Or, you could think of it as me getting paid $40 to switch.

    We've been with them for a year now, and all is well. The Nexus 4 died and was replaced by a Moto G LTE Gen1 that I use today. My wife's Moto E Gen1 was replaced with a Moto E Gen2 (mostly to retain familiarity and the increased internal storage). My older son's Moto E Gen1 was replaced with a BLU Life 8 XL (he's 6'6" with huge hands - the Moto E was just too small). The old Moto E Gen1s have been repurposed as media players and backup phones.

    There is something to be said for playing in the mid-to-low end of the phone pool and only having to pay $100 a month for 5 lines. I can take advantage of deals and upgrade a phone on a whim. If a phone breaks, the replacement costs are manageable.

  8. #8
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    I switched my entire family over to Cricket because the "perfect storm" scenario actually happened.

    (1) We have been AT&T customers for many years (dating back to AT&T Blue, although we did end up switching in place to a AT&T Orange/Cingular plan along the way).

    When we first became AT&T Wireless customers as a family (my dad previously had his service with MCI Worldcom and later Voicestream. I had separate service with AT&T TDMA and then Voicestream), they offered the best balance between network performance, service pricing and apparently generous enough incentives for dealers to offer us decent phones for free. Pre-paid service then was something of a joke and horribly overpriced.

    More recently, it did not sit well with me that our monthly total for four lines (calls only, no text and no data) crept up from about $83 net with FAN discount to $99 a few months ago.

    Our voice call usage dwindled to all time lows, so I switched everyone back to T-Mobile prepaid for basic coverage.

    (2) Just about everybody in my family (except for myself, it looks like) were clamoring for smartphones for some time. I held the line firmly as I thought AT&T's pricing for data and text was overpriced to begin with and didn't think highly of AT&T's policy of force adding a data plan for smartphones (despite all of us intending to use Wi-Fi only for data anyway).

    That said, the clamshells and slider phones we had on hand served us well for years (and probably has more features than what carriers sell now), but were breaking down from normal wear and tear.

    (3) I've been watching AIO/Cricket for some time and was contemplating on making the switch. Cricket offering phone rebates plus porting incentives last month sealed the deal. Effectively free phones, no sunk costs for switching and free months of service. Paying $1 more a month for all inclusive from our former AT&T postpaid service price afterwards sounded good to me.

    Of course, I'm wary that rebates can be reneged upon. But so far, I've had a good track record on collecting, even the more recalcitrant ones.
    History doesn't necessarily repeat, but it rhymes - each with its own twists...

  9. #9
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    Port-in credits and referral bonus. Will switch to another carrier when they run out and come back next year for 6 more free months.

  10. #10
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    I switched in the summer of 2014 from virgin mobile. Since I have been on cricket, I've tested out t mobile and metro for a time and both were insufficient for my me in terms of coverage. If everything you do is within a tmobile footprint, metro or T Mobile are probably better buys for you. I like AT&T coverage so I think that cricket is the best deal around.

  11. #11
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    I was done with Verizon postpaid. After the subsidies on new phones dried up, there was no justification for their ridiculous prices.

    I went looking for an MVNO on AT&T or Verizon. (Okay, yes I know Cricket isn't an MVNO, but it sure looks/acts like one.) The big advantage I found from Cricket was a local (<1 mile away) reseller with actual humans to talk to. Yes, I'm old-school and wanted my hand held through the porting process. Cricket was also the carrier with the lowest TCO (phone + service prices) that met my needs.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eggsalad View Post
    I was done with Verizon postpaid. After the subsidies on new phones dried up, there was no justification for their ridiculous prices.

    I went looking for an MVNO on AT&T or Verizon. (Okay, yes I know Cricket isn't an MVNO, but it sure looks/acts like one.) The big advantage I found from Cricket was a local (<1 mile away) reseller with actual humans to talk to. Yes, I'm old-school and wanted my hand held through the porting process. Cricket was also the carrier with the lowest TCO (phone + service prices) that met my needs.
    AT&T owns Cricket so yes Cricket is an AT&T MVNO.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Direction View Post
    AT&T owns Cricket so yes Cricket is an AT&T MVNO.
    I've seen these hairs split before on this forum. According to Wikipedia (yeah, I know...)

    "A mobile virtual network operator (MVNO), ... is a wireless communications services provider that does not own the wireless network infrastructure over which the MVNO provides services to its customers."

    Cricket, being wholly owned by AT&T, technically does not own their own wireless network infrastructure, it's true. On a technical level, you're right. But neither is Cricket independent of the infrastructure provider, except in a legal sense.

    Split the hairs any way you'd like. It's really irrelevant to this discussion whether Cricket is an MVNO or not.

  14. #14
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    5 lines for $100 taxes and fees included so there's no room for bill to randomly change (which would always happen every month with AT&T). Same Reliable AT&T service

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by vcdlmp View Post
    5 lines for $100 taxes and fees included so there's no room for bill to randomly change (which would always happen every month with AT&T). Same Reliable AT&T service
    Well, your bill is going up $10 in March when the 5th line credit goes down to $30 (from $40). Unless the plan on extending it.

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