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Thread: FBI Demands iPhone Backdoor from Apple

  1. #16
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    Tim Cook is making this an issue for PR. A warrant has been issued, the terrorist doesn't even own the phone(the state of California owns the device). The warrant is for the ONE specific device. And he is MAKING IT A BACKDOOR issue when Apple already has backdoors in Icloud. He is doing this to make people only think Icraps are secure....at the expense of a devastating event. Any idiot can jailbreak an Icrap...they are the farthest thing from secure devices.

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  2. #17
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    Apple will end up complying. It may take a couple of years to wend its way through the inevitable appeals, etc.

    Apple will also design the next iPhones to not be vulnerable to this kind of firmware update attack. Yet another security arms race.

    Meanwhile, if you care about the security of your smartphone: turn off icloud/google cloud backups and use a complex password or a long random numerical passcode to resist brute force attacks. 12 random digits should probably suffice for the kind of attack the FBI is proposing where a password attempt takes ~80ms. Also think carefully about your threat model and whether or not you want to use a fingerprint sensor to unlock your phone.

    The FBI chose the perfect case to push their agenda. Terrorism is (rightly) scary. Politicians who have no understanding of the technology and implications are talking about it.
    Last edited by mch; 02-20-2016 at 12:54 PM.
    "I didn't get fat by accident. This was a personal choice. " - Kevin Gillespie

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    This story got really interesting today when it was reported that, after the phone was in FBI possession, the county changed the Apple ID. Apple was helping when someone completely ****ed up. Now they want Apple to bail them out but compromising the security we all insist on.

    Let's face it, these where not terrorists aligned with anyone but their own insanity.
    "Hey honey, let's drop the kid off at grandmas and go kill as many people at my work as possible and then ourselves". And plan the whole thing on my county issued iPhone? More like Amosexuals everywhere. Muslim, Mormon, all crazy.

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    So a bunch of people are so worried about their "privacy" (like the FBI gives a flying F*** about your porn habits or who you're cheating on your wife with) that they'd rather see mass murderers go free than to have the ability to check their phone to use it as evidence against them.

    That's just idiotic.

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    No, I think they're worried about all the other requests they'll get if this is accomplished and the commercial perception of other security issues, like Apple Pay. If Law Enforcement & the courts can force a company to do work for them (Writing Code In This Case), where do you draw the line?

    Also, as Tim Cook stated, if the "Good Guys" can gain access, so can "The Bad Guys".

  6. #21
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    If these people were communicating with other terrorists who are planning a dirty bomb attact on NYC, the FBI misses it because Apple prevails, and a million people are killed, that's just the price of freedom, folks. Your privacy is far more important in the end than all those lives.

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    And if they are found to be mailing letters back and forth then the FBI should be able to open and read all your mail. You know, just in case.

    It's the old, "Well, if you don't have anything to hide..." BS that privacy haters have always fallen back on. Read the 4th Amendment about being secure in their persons, papers and effects against unreasonable searches... and no warrant shall be issued but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation... describing the thing to be seized. That warrant essentially is a "Fishing Expedition".

    Edward Snowden did us all a huge favor when he revealed to some degree how the FBI and NSA overstepped their authority to spy on everyday citizens with "Nothing To Hide".

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    And if they are found to be mailing letters back and forth then the FBI should be able to open and read all your mail. You know, just in case.
    Sure, why not? If they want to pay people to open my mail and see that my electricity bill is $312.37 they can go right ahead.

    If you have nothing to hide, then why do you care so much if the FBI, NSA, CIA or whoever else looks into your stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    Edward Snowden did us all a huge favor when he revealed to some degree how the FBI and NSA overstepped their authority to spy on everyday citizens with "Nothing To Hide".
    No he didn't. He just made it easier for people with something to hide to hide things.

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    Well like, that's your opinion, man.

    We obviously disagree, but that's freedom of speech, the First Amendment.

    But I do hide my credit card numbers, social security number, bank account password, etc. from the public in general, some of whom are probably bad guys. So ya, I have things to hide, and some of them are on my iPhone.

    But I do understand your position, so can we just agree to disagree?

    Edited for a quick question, Do you password protect your phone, lock your car or house, or are they unlocked always? If you do, how is that different?

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    But I do hide my credit card numbers, social security number, bank account password, etc. from the public in general, some of whom are probably bad guys. So ya, I have things to hide, and some of them are on my iPhone.
    Since when is the FBI investigating a high profile murder case the general public?

    I never said Apple should do away with passcodes all together, but they should have a method for the authorities to get in if necessary, such as this case.

    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    Edited for a quick question, Do you password protect your phone, lock your car or house, or are they unlocked always? If you do, how is that different?
    I don't use a passcode on my phone since they are annoying as hell and I will lock my vehicle or home to keep the general public out, since I said I don't care if the FBI or RCMP wants to read my emails or know my financial status but I don't want just random people in my stuff. That being said, locks are for honest people anyway, if someone wants to break into my house or truck, it's easy enough to just break a window.

    If you can't see the difference between the general public and the authorities, then I pity you.

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    And if you believe that there are not those in government who have and will continue to subvert the tools and authority they have, then I pity you.

    "EFF scores a blow against the government's domestic spying

    The group has been granted discovery in its case against the National Security Agency"

    http://www.engadget.com/2016/02/20/eff-vs-nsa-FIGHT/

    Many links within this article about malfeasance by your "Authorities".

    Keep trusting Big Brother if you dare.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    Keep trusting Big Brother if you dare.
    Hahahahahahaha

    If the government is spying on me, they better have an endless supply of coffee because that's got to be one hell of a boring job.

    Better cover your butt though. The FBI might want your internet banking password or credit card number! And we know this is true because some government officials abuse their authority!

    If those in a position of power such as the FBI or NSA or whatever have the ability to somehow remotely access my iPhone to turn on the camera to watch me work on equipment in the shop or watch a hockey game on TV, go nuts. I'm sure it's thrilling.

    Let me guess, you're also the person who refuses to go through an airport body scanner, right?
    Last edited by jcalder; 02-20-2016 at 03:30 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    No, I think they're worried about all the other requests they'll get if this is accomplished and the commercial perception of other security issues, like Apple Pay. If Law Enforcement & the courts can force a company to do work for them (Writing Code In This Case), where do you draw the line?

    Also, as Tim Cook stated, if the "Good Guys" can gain access, so can "The Bad Guys".
    What requests other than (let's say) an FBI Search Warrant signed by a Federal Judge?

    All the Feds want from Apple is the ability to remove the self erasing feature on the phone. They certainly can get into a locked phone, tablet or computer already.

    Cook is full of crap and is simply protecting the profits of Apple. If the program that the Feds wanted stayed in house who else would have access to it?

    Even Mr Liberal Obama sees the need for this. The ACLU has been rather quiet as well.

    I have nothing to hide but still wouldn't like it if I thought they were peeking into my phone. However to gain access to a device that was owned/used by a person who may have pledged allegiance to ISIS and then went on to massacre innocent lives is a different story.

    Once again, where do we find an acceptable solution rather than people staunchly defending extreme, polar opposite sides of the issue?

  14. #29
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    FBI Demands iPhone Backdoor from Apple

    @billm261
    here is the ACLU's comment:

    https://www.aclu.org/news/aclu-comme...-unlock-iphone

    NEW YORK — The American Civil Liberties Union said today that it would support Apple’s legal fight against a court order to help the government unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the people responsible for the San Bernardino shootings.

    Alex Abdo, staff attorney with the ACLU Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, had this comment:

    “This is an unprecedented, unwise, and unlawful move by the government. The Constitution does not permit the government to force companies to hack into their customers' devices. Apple is free to offer a phone that stores information securely, and it must remain so if consumers are to retain any control over their private data.

    “The government's request also risks setting a dangerous precedent. If the FBI can force Apple to hack into its customers' devices, then so too can every repressive regime in the rest of the world. Apple deserves praise for standing up for its right to offer secure devices to all of its customers.”

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mch View Post
    @billm261
    here is the ACLU's comment:

    https://www.aclu.org/news/aclu-comme...-unlock-iphone
    Thanks for that Info, while I'm not surprised at the response I hadn't seen it.

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