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Thread: FBI Demands iPhone Backdoor from Apple

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgeekb View Post
    I don't think anyone is saying not to use a pin/password or a seatbelt, that is common sense. It's beyond that, or worrying that the Government is trying to spy on everyone or break into everyone's smartphone where it gets a bit much.


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    I was quoting someone else that mentioned that he/she doesn't use a PIN for his/her phone. I agree that it's common sense. I also think it's common sense that no one is infallible and can be a victim. You're entitled to your opinion and I'm just going to agree to disagree here with you

    Quote Originally Posted by jcalder View Post
    I've been a firefighter for 10 years, we've had instances where people not wearing their seatbelts saved their lives in car wrecks and we've also had the opposite. So take that for what it's worth.


    Exactly.

    I don't use a passcode on my phone because I find it annoying. I'm not telling other people not to use one though. Just like I wear a seat belt about 95% of the time. Sometimes I don't and that may or may not bite me in the butt. I understand keeping the general public out of your business. I don't understand being paranoid that the government might be spying on you. Chances are the government doesn't give a crap about you as long as you pay your taxes and aren't dealing drugs or killing people.

    I don't worry about hackers hacking into my stuff either. If it happens, well I guess I'll deal with that if/when it happens. But to me the likelihood of it is so slim it doesn't outweigh the hassle of punching in a stupid passcode every time I get a text message.

    Sometimes if I think of it when I'm travelling I'll put a passcode on my phone, but even then I usually forget because I just don't worry about that kind of crap.
    Not using a PIN on your phone or not wearing a seatbelt is your prerogative. Bad stuff happens to good people all the time and you know that better than anyone else, being a firefighter. All I have to say to you is good luck!
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  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by MkVsTheWorld View Post
    Not using a PIN on your phone or not wearing a seatbelt is your prerogative. Bad stuff happens to good people all the time and you know that better than anyone else, being a firefighter. All I have to say to you is good luck!
    I agree.

    Regardless of what comes of this saga between the government and Apple, I have my doubts it will change how the average user utilizes their phones.

    People who must have their passcodes will still have them and if the government wins, might be more worried that their stuff is being looked through.

    People like me won't be affected either way. I just hope that there isn't some information on some upcoming tragic event that could potentially be stopped if the FBI were allowed into that device.

  3. #78
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    FBI Demands iPhone Backdoor from Apple

    Quote Originally Posted by mike21222 View Post
    Blahahaha. Someone still believes the FBI is trying to save lives. How 1980's is that, just saying...
    It's more than since the 1980s. The FBI has been corrupt and has abused its power longer than most of us have been alive. It goes back to Hoover, the first FBI director. Some of this is well documented.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Edgar_Hoover

    Comey is simply a continuation of a long sordid history.

    I wouldn't trust the FBI with almost anything. They have proven themselves untrustworthy and frequently incompetent.
    "I didn't get fat by accident. This was a personal choice. " - Kevin Gillespie

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    Quote Originally Posted by mch View Post
    It's more than since the 1980s. The FBI has been corrupt and has abused its power longer than most of us have been alive. It goes back to Hoover, the first FBI director. Some of this is well documented.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Edgar_Hoover

    Comey is simply a continuation of a long sordid history.

    I wouldn't trust the FBI with almost anything. They have proven themselves untrustworthy and frequently incompetent.
    You should check-out the book called Fire in a Canebrake, it details the FBI investigation and it's a perfect example of what you said.

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    It doesn't matter whether you or I care about keeping whatever is on our phone private. What matters is that it is a Constitutionally guaranteed right that each citizen can decide for themselves whether or not they want to keep stuff private. It's like free speech--you may hate the speech someone is spouting, but you should also appreciate that they and you have the right to spout what you want to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ten Four View Post
    It doesn't matter whether you or I care about keeping whatever is on our phone private. What matters is that it is a Constitutionally guaranteed right that each citizen can decide for themselves whether or not they want to keep stuff private.
    I think your ad-libbing the 4th Amendment a bit.

    Even if that iPhone was not password locked, the government can not legally look at its contents without a search warrant for the most part.

    The 4th Amendment simply protects us from "unreasonable" searches and seizures from the government.

    The ultimate goal of this provision is to protect people’s right to privacy and freedom from arbitrary governmental intrusions. Private intrusions not acting in the color of governmental authority are exempted from the Fourth Amendment.

    We are in a new era, unchartered waters you might say on this. I don't think the Feds request is unreasonable but now they fighting against corporate profits as well as civil libertarians.

    Like the 2nd Amendment, we will have extremist on both sides of the issue.

    I'm all for a common sense solution but I doubt we will ever see one.

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