Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 77

Thread: Verizon Gigabit LTE

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,953
    Device(s)
    Verizon Galaxy S6
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by weskeene View Post
    By the way, which specific feature(s) did you hear was/were disabled on the S8?
    I think it was the 4x4 mimo.

    Sent from my Galaxy S8+ using the HoFo app

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Posts
    1,327
    Device(s)
    SM-G965U1
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by WiredGuy View Post
    I think it was the 4x4 mimo.

    Sent from my Galaxy S8+ using the HoFo app
    Wow. That would really be insane.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    298
    Device(s)
    iPhone 8 Plus
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Gigabit speeds over LTE can be achieved without unlicensed spectrum in areas where Verizon has 50 MHz of downlink LTE licensed spectrum deployed with 4x4 MIMO and 256 QAM. For example: 20 MHz Band 4 + 20 MHz Band 2 + 10 MHz Band 13.

    "Standard" LTE theoretical peak speeds are 75 Mbps per 10 MHz channel, assuming 2x2 MIMO (which all LTE smartphones have, as far as I know) and 64 QAM downlink. Relative to this, 4x4 MIMO doubles theoretical peak speed, 256 QAM downlink increases it by one third; as a result, each 10 MHz channel can theoretically reach 200 Mbps, so you'd need five of them.

    In areas where Verizon has 20x20 Band 4 but only 10x10 or 15x15 Band 2, they could still achieve gigabit LTE theoretical peak speeds over licensed spectrum if they refarm and aggregate Band 5 (850 MHz) as well. One such area is my own market of Hampton Roads, VA, where Verizon only has 10 MHz of Band 2 LTE deployed (according to my last check), but they own the entire cellular/850/Band 5 spectrum block. Of course, this would require that user equipment support 4x carrier aggregation, which was only deployed with the latest batch of smartphones.

    Of course, gigabit speeds are far easier to achieve with the help of unlicensed spectrum, but as you mentioned, unlicensed spectrum has such a short range that it requires a massive small cell or DAS deployment.
    Nice work figuring all that out.

    I think Verizon is going to have to do a combination of the two methods to make gigbit speeds more widespread. Although I really do see the advantage of LAA it’s short range really has me skeptical so once you would leave the an immediate “downtown-heavily populated area” LAA would be more irrelevant. But I also realize that in those very populated areas that congestion would be a big problem getting gigabit speeds without LAA anyways so it’s kind of a catch 22.

    Hopefully they do a combination of the two and use LAA in the metro area then move to big equipment upgrades and spectrum as you move further out.

    Plus with all that high spectrum verizon bought for 5G it’s all short distance stuff from what I have read so it will have to be used in dense areas leaving everywhere else open to more big equipment upgrades to get the higher speeds.

    On a side note in an article I saw from ATT, they made it seem like they are using 600 and 700 MHz frequency for 5G and it will have “better speed, coverage, and penetration than 4G” but it’s confusing the way it’s written and I’m not sure of that will be a “5G evolution network” or a true 5G Network.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    557
    Device(s)
    iPhone, iPad
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    I seriously doubt that 5G will have better range at the same frequencies than 4G, since more complex RF signals tend to be less resistant to attenuation. (Like how Verizon's 1xRTT has better range at 850 MHz than LTE at 750 MHz, despite being at a higher frequency.)

    The only way I can see 5G improving range at the same frequencies is if it allows for even higher-order MIMO than LTE, since additional antennae improve SNR. If 5G makes it possible to have 8x8 or even 16x16 MIMO at sub-1 GHz frequencies, we're in for a real treat!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,336
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeInPa View Post
    Nice work figuring all that out.

    I think Verizon is going to have to do a combination of the two methods to make gigbit speeds more widespread. Although I really do see the advantage of LAA it’s short range really has me skeptical so once you would leave the an immediate “downtown-heavily populated area” LAA would be more irrelevant. But I also realize that in those very populated areas that congestion would be a big problem getting gigabit speeds without LAA anyways so it’s kind of a catch 22.

    Hopefully they do a combination of the two and use LAA in the metro area then move to big equipment upgrades and spectrum as you move further out.

    Plus with all that high spectrum verizon bought for 5G it’s all short distance stuff from what I have read so it will have to be used in dense areas leaving everywhere else open to more big equipment upgrades to get the higher speeds.

    On a side note in an article I saw from ATT, they made it seem like they are using 600 and 700 MHz frequency for 5G and it will have “better speed, coverage, and penetration than 4G” but it’s confusing the way it’s written and I’m not sure of that will be a “5G evolution network” or a true 5G Network.
    That’s why Verizon is building a very dense small cell network. LAA will eventually be aggregated with spectrum from other towers so even though 5GHZ has short range , it’s still a win win situation. Think of all the users in a dense urban area that will take advantage of this unlicensed spectrum. Verizon will probably do massive MIMO on their macro network, and tons of LAA and mmW spectrum on their small cells.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Posts
    1,327
    Device(s)
    SM-G965U1
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I seriously doubt that 5G will have better range at the same frequencies than 4G, since more complex RF signals tend to be less resistant to attenuation. (Like how Verizon's 1xRTT has better range at 850 MHz than LTE at 750 MHz, despite being at a higher frequency.)

    The only way I can see 5G improving range at the same frequencies is if it allows for even higher-order MIMO than LTE, since additional antennae improve SNR. If 5G makes it possible to have 8x8 or even 16x16 MIMO at sub-1 GHz frequencies, we're in for a real treat!
    I strongly doubt 5G will improve range, as well. The efficiency improvements aren't much to brag about, either. Massive MIMO, as implemented with LTE will provide most of the same improvements.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    298
    Device(s)
    iPhone 8 Plus
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I seriously doubt that 5G will have better range at the same frequencies than 4G, since more complex RF signals tend to be less resistant to attenuation. (Like how Verizon's 1xRTT has better range at 850 MHz than LTE at 750 MHz, despite being at a higher frequency.)

    The only way I can see 5G improving range at the same frequencies is if it allows for even higher-order MIMO than LTE, since additional antennae improve SNR. If 5G makes it possible to have 8x8 or even 16x16 MIMO at sub-1 GHz frequencies, we're in for a real treat!
    After reading the article more closely it appears that the increase in range was referring to the “5G evolution network I.e. fake 5G network”. It looks like they are going to put true 5G in some major markets and in others just add massive MIMO and LAA and call those 5G evolution networks as a marketing stunt.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    298
    Device(s)
    iPhone 8 Plus
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by weskeene View Post
    I strongly doubt 5G will improve range, as well. The efficiency improvements aren't much to brag about, either. Massive MIMO, as implemented with LTE will provide most of the same improvements.
    I think massive MIMO is the real future. It will be able to virtually eliminate congestion during peak hours and if it’s cost effective enough it a would be a great way to deliver faster rural home internet.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    557
    Device(s)
    iPhone, iPad
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    I want to see their massive MIMO. ( ͡º ͜ʖ ͡º)

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    664
    Feedback Score
    0
    You notice most talk of 5g helping rural folk has crawled to a dribble. Now that N.N has been reversed. Us people in the sticks are truly ****** now.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Posts
    1,327
    Device(s)
    SM-G965U1
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I want to see their massive MIMO. ( ͡º ͜ʖ ͡º)
    Heh. /10Char

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    557
    Device(s)
    iPhone, iPad
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    I like the idea of being able to take more inputs at once.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Chattanooga, TN
    Posts
    1,327
    Device(s)
    SM-G965U1
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I like the idea of being able to take more inputs at once.
    Dang girl!! This is family friendly here!

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    557
    Device(s)
    iPhone, iPad
    Carrier(s)
    Verizon Wireless, AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by weskeene View Post
    Dang girl!! This is family friendly here!
    I'm just talking about RF technology!!

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,790
    Device(s)
    Galaxy S6 Active
    Carrier(s)
    AT&T
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeInPa View Post
    After reading the article more closely it appears that the increase in range was referring to the “5G evolution network I.e. fake 5G network”. It looks like they are going to put true 5G in some major markets and in others just add massive MIMO and LAA and call those 5G evolution networks as a marketing stunt.
    You have a link to the article?

    Sent from my SM-G892A using HoFo mobile app

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. iPhones 8 and X Appear to Support Verizon's Gigabit LTE
    By VVivian in forum Verizon Wireless
    Replies: 100
    Last Post: 12-26-2017, 08:27 PM
  2. Vodafone chief: Verizon needs LTE before we do
    By @TheRealDanny in forum Verizon Wireless
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 04-21-2008, 01:40 AM
  3. Next Evolution for Verizon is LTE, with SIM cards?
    By FerneyZan in forum Verizon Wireless
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-10-2008, 12:14 AM
  4. Verizon !CONFIRMS! LTE for 4G Upgrade Path
    By boostmiser in forum Verizon Wireless
    Replies: 85
    Last Post: 02-14-2008, 04:03 PM
  5. Verizon Confirms LTE as 4G Technology
    By nakoda in forum TELUS Mobility
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-30-2007, 11:39 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks