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Thread: Hotspot Carrier Aggregation

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rxrebel30 View Post
    That all makes sense, but why wouldn't my 2.4 GHz antenna be more preferential for band 30? Or even the downlink side of band 66 than for band 2? It always goes for band 2, no matter the hotspot.
    The wavelength of 2.4 Ghz is 12.5 cm, that is the length of its yagi element. However, FD-LTE duplex requires slightly different UL/DL frequencies, so different dipoles are needed. I have not opened up one of these commercial yagis, but they probably have 10 elements that are precisely measured to 10 Mhz increments. There is only so much space on the backbone to fit elements, and they have to be separated and staggered to prevent electrical impedance.

    If your antenna was intended for satellite, which it probably was, satellite modulation is completely different from LTE, WCDMA or GSM. The elements are probably too short to amplify Band 30 properly and there are too few elements to target the specific uplink and downlink AT&T is using.

    Band 4/66: Band 4 is a subset of Band 66. To access the Band 66 specific frequencies, you need shorter elements corresponding to the possible uplink/downlink duplexes. Band 66 only adds to noise on Band 4 elements.

    Finally, there are no third party signal boosters FCC-approved to transmit Band 30 or Band 66. If that's what you are relying on for signal, you should talk to AT&T for solutions.

  2. #17
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    Update:
    Yesterday I added a Wilson flat panel to the mix for testing purposes and saw ~10 Mbps of improvement. It is obvious that the flat panel doesn't have enough gain to be super consistent. I have a wideband yagi on the way and will try it both alone and in conjunction with the parabolic. The parabolic must, by accident, be very specific for LTE band 2. Progress!

  3. #18
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    I’ve always had good luck with the Wilson line of signal boosters. They are good for home installations. Something like this would work great for even very low outdoor signal situations:

    https://www.wilsonamplifiers.com/web...er-kit-470103/

    It’s a bit pricy, but you get what you pay for.
    I do not represent any company or other entity. Anything I post in these forums or write on this site are my thoughts and opinions only. I make every attempt to be 100% accurate, but I am human and do make mistakes from time to time.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barney Bounds View Post
    The wavelength of 2.4 Ghz is 12.5 cm, that is the length of its yagi element. However, FD-LTE duplex requires slightly different UL/DL frequencies, so different dipoles are needed. I have not opened up one of these commercial yagis, but they probably have 10 elements that are precisely measured to 10 Mhz increments. There is only so much space on the backbone to fit elements, and they have to be separated and staggered to prevent electrical impedance.
    The active element of a Yagi antenna is a half wave dipole - 6.25 cm at 2.4 GHz. It is the second longest one. All the rest are passive and not connected to the antenna cable. The longer one at the back is a reflector. The rest of the progressively shorter ones forward on the rail are directors.

    I wonder if these wide-band Yagis are actually log periodic dipole arrays. They look similar. They have great bandwidth, but not so much gain.

    If your antenna was intended for satellite, which it probably was, satellite modulation is completely different from LTE, WCDMA or GSM. The elements are probably too short to amplify Band 30 properly and there are too few elements to target the specific uplink and downlink AT&T is using.
    The modulation of an RF signal has nothing to do with the antenna to transmit or receive it. That makes about as much sense as "digital" audio speaker cables. Antennas are modulation agnostic.

    The algorithm that cell sites use to determine what band they connect us to is pretty much beyond our control.

  5. #20
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    You can manipulate band selection without RAT access by taking advantage of a smartphone's preference for the strongest signal bands. My booster is SureCall which has manual adjustment dials alongside an autogain adjustment. By turning down Band 5, Band 4 and only amplifying Band 2, 13, 17, I can force my phone to aggregate 2 and 12 instead of 2 and 30.
    It is preferential in my area where Band 30 is more heavily congested during crunch time (5-9 PM), and x3 CA is unstable.

  6. #21
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    Quick update: I received my 12 dB log periodic antenna yesterday. I quickly put it up and received band 30 for the first time. Signal was fairly low, at about 105. speeds were 5-10mbps. I connected my parabolic to the other port, (that receives band 2 at about 15-25 mbps), but it didn't seem to be aggregating the two. In the next couple of days I plan on moving the new antenna to a better place and maximizing it's signal before reaching any conclusions. I am concerned, though , that it didn't combine the 2 like my phone does. I will report back in a couple of days.
    .

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rxrebel30 View Post
    Quick update: I received my 12 dB log periodic antenna yesterday. I quickly put it up and received band 30 for the first time. Signal was fairly low, at about 105. speeds were 5-10mbps. I connected my parabolic to the other port, (that receives band 2 at about 15-25 mbps), but it didn't seem to be aggregating the two. In the next couple of days I plan on moving the new antenna to a better place and maximizing it's signal before reaching any conclusions. I am concerned, though , that it didn't combine the 2 like my phone does. I will report back in a couple of days.
    .
    Nice, thanks for all the testing.

  8. #23
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    As promised, here is an update:

    I ended up using both the parabolic antenna, which is a 2.4 ghz 24 dB, and a 12 dB log periodic. They are mounted on top of a shop building about 30 yards from my house. I ran them to the Nighthawk located in a weatherproof box under the eave of the building. A nanostation is mounted on my house to get the signal inside. I was using 30 ft of RG-58 from the parabolic for some time, but am now using a 25 ft piece of LMR-400 for each antenna. The tower is about 10 miles away, but I am on a hill with a lot of open country in front of me. I am now showing a signal of 92 on band 2, with a quality of around 60. When the nighthawk is showing band 30, it is only a signal of about 110. I must be aggregating some different bands, because I am seeing speeds anywhere from 25-50 mbps, depending on time of day, and other unknown factors. Overall, a big improvement that I am very pleased with. I wish the nighthawk would give info about secondary bands, though.

  9. #24
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    Thanks for the update. Would you mind posting model #'s or links to some parts in the setup. I'm most interested in two things. The adapter from the nighthawk to the LMR and the antenna's themselves.

  10. #25
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  11. #26
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    ^^ Thanks for the info. After doing some reading, I stumbled on some chatter about using dual yagi's but the trick they say is to orient them at 90 degrees to each other. You never tried dual yagi's though right?

  12. #27
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    Dumb question - but how do you find out the info on your tower?

  13. #28
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    Never tried dual yagis. To be honest, I think that the parabolic is the backbone of the setup, the log periodic seems to be just adding some to the overall speed. I think I would be going backwards in overall signal received if I went with dual yagis. The times when I pick up band 30 as the primary sees my signal and speed both go down.

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