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Thread: T-Mobile Reports Record Financial Results FY 2017

  1. #16
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    People in urban areas travel to rural areas. As T Mobile expands, the user who travels and the people they visit would consider T Mobile. The future customer growth will come from both groups as T Mobile expands coverage.

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    With tmobiles prices being similar to the rest in many ways, I think coverage will be more and more a deciding factor as time goes by.

    As an example one line on TMobile one is $70 (not including kickback). I could get one line on Verizon for $55(plus tax -discount) at 5gb. It's not unlimited but that may be enough for someone. If coverage isn't there with TMobile where they need it I'd be doubtful TMobile would gain them as a customer.

    TMobile knows they can only compete so far on price and that coverage becomes a big factor. At a cheap price I can overlook some coverage issues but not at $70 for one line.

    If I know better coverage is in the works I can live with that unless it's really bad currently.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by CallmeJake View Post
    People in urban areas travel to rural areas. As T Mobile expands, the user who travels and the people they visit would consider T Mobile. The future customer growth will come from both groups as T Mobile expands coverage.
    Another thing to consider is that people in urban areas often send their kids to colleges in small towns. When Junior gets to school in Oberlin or Morgantown or Hiram, and finds there's no (or poor) T-Mobile service there, it's not just Junior's phone that gets switched to a new carrier, it's the whole family. This is one more reason why T-Mobile needs to pay attention to small towns, even if they don't cover Death Valley.
    Donald Newcomb

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    Another thing to consider is that people in urban areas often send their kids to colleges in small towns. When Junior gets to school in Oberlin or Morgantown or Hiram, and finds there's no (or poor) T-Mobile service there, it's not just Junior's phone that gets switched to a new carrier, it's the whole family. This is one more reason why T-Mobile needs to pay attention to small towns, even if they don't cover Death Valley.
    Exactly, DR. And excuses such as "Those people will be on Verizon or AT&T anyway and T-Mobile doesn't need their business" doesn't cut it now. and never did.

    As for your example of Oberlin... it is in Lorain County, Ohio, which has a population of more than 300,000. If Lorain is typical of an American area, it has 10 or 20 times as many annual visitors compared to the fixed population, which would be 3 million to 6 million. Lorain is adjacent to, on the fringe of the Cleveland metro area (Oberlin itself is about 15 miles from the Cleveland metro area), and I-90 gets a massive amount of travel through the county and near Oberlin.

    This situation with Oberlin is typical: instead of just a small college population needing coverage, you get many millions who frequent the town and surrounding area needing coverage as well. Hiram, it turns out, has a similar situation to Oberlin. T-Mobile would be foolish to blow off areas like this and the money they would get... but as we well know., they are not foolish. Truly "desolate" areas, where you don't have hundreds or thousands to tens of millions needing coverage, are actually pretty rare in the "lower 48".

    As for outright, actual Death Valley? That hovers around a million annual visitors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimMcGraff View Post
    I'm not sure that's the argument. What was presented was that the expansion of the network was drawing customers but what was stated in the presser was that the promos, giveaways, and all the other stuff T-Mobile does to sell the farm is the main draw in bringing customers in. This makes sense given their ads on TV that boast the same ("Taxes and fees included!", "Free Netflix on us!") which is how you can typically reach most of your audience. They're not boasting about the new expansion for now although I could see ads down the road once they get more sites up and running.

    Regardless of how much they're expanding and at what pace I'd bet my next paycheck that the majority of customers a) don't even know or care about 600Mhz or that there even is a network expansion in the works and b) probably don't even know what LTE bands are since they just figure "LTE" is one thing that makes the phone work.
    Of course! All very true! Yet some constantly say things like, "T-Mobile has been rapidly expanding coverage, and that has resulted in strong growth in the number of customers quarter after quarter. " However, my quotes from the actual quarterly report says that it's not the expansion that they attribute their growth to at all:

    "all thanks to consumer-friendly offers and an Un-carrier philosophy that puts customers first."

    And once someone points out that the false narrative differs from the T-Mobile press release then the name-calling begins in earnest.

    And while he's busy attributing T-Mobile's customer growth to its "expansion", in other threads, statements such as this are being made:

    "the T-Mobile network is still, say. only 75% as good as Verizon's,"

    So he's claiming that the inferior coverage (per him) is the reason that T-Mobile leads all carriers in new additions. That makes no logical sense whatsoever. Perhaps instead, they are switching to T-Mobile for something that T-Mobile is leading the industry in such as this:

    "T-Mobile’s network continues to be faster and more technologically advanced than our competition, and that trend will only continue as we clear and deploy new spectrum, densify our network, and lay the groundwork for 5G. We have been the fastest network in America in both download and upload speeds for the past 16 quarters and this quarter, we were the first U.S. carrier to exceed 30 Mbps average download speed with 31.6 Mbps. "

    That would make much more logical sense.

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    75% as good now when it was less than a third as good a few years ago is great progress. As I do indeed mention. A trajectory for success.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    75% as good now when it was less than a third as good a few years ago is great progress. As I do indeed mention. A trajectory for success.
    Still sounds quite inferior to me. They still are ranking 4th place for coverage in root metrics. There are still are many complaints being posted for how bad the coverage is in lowly populated areas. And that's why it's the Uncarrier value and things like the free Netflix that causes people to overlook such deficiencies.

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