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Thread: My own phone number was spoofed, even after Stir Shaken was implemented

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    My own phone number was spoofed, even after Stir Shaken was implemented

    Someone had spoofed my number even after the same area code and exchange calls have been mostly eliminated due to Stir Shaken which is now on all Verizon Wireless calls. The few calls I have gotten had an extra 1 in front of them such as (1) +1 xxx-xxxx but they have dried up and I haven’t gotten one in a long time. I did get calls from other numbers however which were all reported.

    This time I got a call from my own number which was in the regular format when I did not place the call. Unclear if someone compromised the actual switch my phone was on as this should not have happened. I reported it to do not call/ftc and fcc and left a share my story comment to the FCC about what had happened. My Verizon Call filter did label the call as Potential Spam however. I found a new update to Verizon Call Filter to version 2.6.3 and updated that so I will see if that has any impact on calls going forward.

    Why would someone as a nuisance caller go to all that trouble to make a call to my phone seem like it was from me? Obviously no one would pick up a call like that, in fact it seemed very intimidating and the fact it didn’t appear like other non authenticated Stir Shaken calls in the same NPA-NXX was troubling. Hopefully the FCC and Do Not Call/FTC take my complaint seriously. The party responsible would be arrested and placed in handcuffs if it was up to me. I think all nuisance calls should be considered a criminal offense but unfortunately they are considered civil. I wish there was a way for me to obtain the records of who this caller actually was.

    I have never had my own number spoofed before with all the nuisance calls received over the years and considering Stir Shaken has dried up all same area code and exchange or same npa nxx calls with the few having an extra 1 in the format, something really seems off here.

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    I believe Verzon has only fully implemented SHAKEN/STIR for calls within the Verizon network and support for calls originating from the outside is not yet complete. Perhaps this is the reason it was not blocked but only warned.

    Also there's no way I'd pick up a call from my own number either but I know several people that I'm sure would pick up just out of curiosity.

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    STIR/SHAKEN doesn't stop the calls, it's only to verify the legitimacy of calls between networks (or inside one network). You can and still will receive spam calls. It verifies a call was placed to a particular number by one network and is received by the intended recipient network (or within one particular network). Kind of like a real-time handshske. Sounds like you don't understand how it works. You should Google it.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using HoFo mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by baaadandy View Post
    STIR/SHAKEN doesn't stop the calls, it's only to verify the legitimacy of calls between networks (or inside one network). You can and still will receive spam calls. It verifies a call was placed to a particular number by one network and is received by the intended recipient network (or within one particular network). Kind of like a real-time handshske. Sounds like you don't understand how it works. You should Google it.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using HoFo mobile app
    Yes I understand how Stir Shaken works and FCC policy towards the wireless carriers.

    With Verizon Wireless on my Iphone, a non authenticated call pretending to be Verizon Wireless which has been fully implemented, would show up as (1) +1 xxx-xxxx if it was a local call from the same npa nxx which is area code and exchange and this one appeared as an authenticated call coming from my own number. Some carriers are actively blocking non authenticated calls as well but from my past Verizon Wireless experience I received them as per the format listed above when they have been received. The extra (1) prevents the number from being dialed as well since is not a true number format.

    I have written to the FCC and Do Not Call/FTC about what happened. I will actively run a trace through my provider and contact law enforcement if it happens again and FCC and FTC don’t resolve it and hold the appropriate party responsible. FCC and FTC can work wth law enforcement so I will see what happens in getting this resolved.

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    You can report it to the FCC and the FTC but not likely that law enforcement will help. Your cell provider won't run a "trace" for you or anyone else without a court order.

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    Last edited by veriztd; 08-27-2019 at 06:44 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTENetwork View Post
    Unclear if someone compromised the actual switch my phone was on as this should not have happened.
    LOL! Compromised switch? Perhaps you should read up about number spoofing and how it's done.

    Why would someone as a nuisance caller go to all that trouble to make a call to my phone seem like it was from me?
    What all that trouble? Register a free account on FireRTC and spoof away! This is just one example.



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    Last edited by TadMorose; 08-27-2019 at 12:07 PM.
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    OP, technically you don't own your phone number. You are essentially leasing it. If you cancel service and don't port your phone # to another carrier, your phone # is returned to the original cellular carrier it was activated on. The phone # can be re-assigned to a new customer after an established time frame (I think 60 or 90 days).

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    Last edited by veriztd; 08-27-2019 at 06:42 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TadMorose View Post
    LOL! Compromised switch? Perhaps you should read up about number spoofing and how it's done.



    What all that trouble? Register a free account on FireRTC and spoof away! This is just one example.



    Sent from my CLT-L04 using Tapatalk
    I am well aware of how spoofing is done. The difference is that Verizon Wireless is now authenticating them with Stir Shaken. So if it is pretending to be a Verizon Wireless number which this was, it would appear on my Iphone as (1) +1 xxx-xxxx instead of +1 xxx-xxxx as the call has not been authenticated. This change was implemented not that long ago. This spoofer came in as what appeared to be an Authenticated call even though my Verizon Call Filter said it was possible spam. Some carriers are blockimg the calls altogether but I noticed on Verizon it was not being blocked but adding a (1) in front of it instead.

    As to how this call got around authentication, I do not know. Unless calls from the same number won’t show the (1) but that defeats the purpose of Stir Shaken authentication on these same number calls. I wrote to the FCC about this and hopefully the caller will get caught and these calls can be stopped.

    I still get scams on my number with loads of nuisance calls. The last one threatened me with criminal action if I didn’t call the number back. I reported it to the FBI in addition to the other government agencies. The number quickly got shut down. I kept calling the number, and hanging up on the agents multiple times and threatened one with criminal indictment and extradition to USA as it appeared to be an offshore call center. The Former FBI director had a scammer as well who he successfully had extradited and prosecuted. Sure I am not the former director but I did report it to everyone who could accelerate this further. It got shut down and Im not sure if law enforcement shut it down or not but I think these criminals wouldn’t have shut it down that fast and their connection at some point must have been disconnected intentionally. The US Attorney’s offices have pursued individuals in international rings in the past. The scary part is some actually use stolen banking or credit report data or social security data so they can collect even more fraudulent information or extort the callers.

    Years ago these scams would not have happened. It seems to have accelerated again even as Stir Shaken was removing most of the local call scams in the same area code and exchange that were being spoofed.

    Hopefully after this one, it will get quiet again and these calls will end as Stir Shaken is spread to a wider chunk of the phone network.

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    Remember that Stir Shaken is fairly new. It helps but it won't catch 100% of all spam.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using HoFo mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by veriztd View Post
    Remember that Stir Shaken is fairly new. It helps but it won't catch 100% of all spam.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using HoFo mobile app
    Since this posting I have got multiple additional spam calls from spoofed numbers where the numbers were not in service. The vast majority of all my calls are spoofed active or inactive numbers. I have reported all of them to FCC and FTC/Do Not Call and other agencies as appropriate. Does not seem like these spoofers are slowing down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LTENetwork View Post
    I have reported all of them to FCC and FTC/Do Not Call and other agencies as appropriate.
    It's just as effective and a lot faster to just ignore them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmtvaquero View Post
    It's just as effective and a lot faster to just ignore them.
    I disagree. The government agencies need the phone numbers dialed out, the numbers they were spoofed as and time of call so they can get phone records from the Carriers themselves go after the perpetrators. The government agencies have access to the database and can deal with Verizon Wireless for instance to find out who is making these calls. Verizon Wireless has a network setup where source of origin of the calls is accessible to themselves and law enforcement and the like but not to individual customers except for billing records.

    The problem is government has only dealt with a small fraction of all the reported calls and they need to do a better job of holding these rogue callers accountable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LTENetwork View Post
    I disagree. The government agencies need the phone numbers dialed out, the numbers they were spoofed as and time of call so they can get phone records from the Carriers themselves go after the perpetrators. The government agencies have access to the database and can deal with Verizon Wireless for instance to find out who is making these calls. Verizon Wireless has a network setup where source of origin of the calls is accessible to themselves and law enforcement and the like but not to individual customers except for billing records.

    The problem is government has only dealt with a small fraction of all the reported calls and they need to do a better job of holding these rogue callers accountable.
    I ignore them, don't report them, and still get them.

    You report them, obsess over them, and still get them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmtvaquero View Post
    It's just as effective and a lot faster to just ignore them.
    Agreed. Same goes with junk mail. Usually, when I go check my mail, I walk to a garbage can in my garage and weed out the junk before I walk in my house.

    No government agency or cell phone provider can or will stop 100% of spam callers. It's not possible when most of the offenders are doing it from an international location and spoof their phone #.

    I know I would be upset if legitimate callers had trouble contacting me if the carrier was having trouble with their caller ID service. This whole issue is a double edged sword. While you want to block spam, if it is too overzealous, you might not get some legitimate calls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LTENetwork View Post
    The problem is government has only dealt with a small fraction of all the reported calls and they need to do a better job of holding these rogue callers accountable.
    And the primary reason for that is never-ending government budget cuts. It does take a lot of money to properly manage these issues. Let's not make this a political debate, please.

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