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Thread: Why get FirstNet if you have phone that supports Band14?

  1. #1
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    Why get FirstNet if you have phone that supports Band14?

    Just wondering what advantages over a standard ATT plan that a FirstNet plan might have. I have seen my phone use Band 14 on occasion on a standard plan (Pixel 3a) so I don't really see what's so special about FirstNet plans.


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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by HFNube View Post
    Just wondering what advantages over a standard ATT plan that a FirstNet plan might have. I have seen my phone use Band 14 on occasion on a standard plan (Pixel 3a) so I don't really see what's so special about FirstNet plans.


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    First net has priority over the network compared to regular consumer lines


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  3. #3
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    Precisely. The average user wouldn't notice the difference on a daily basis but if a major catastrophe or event happened somewhere, FirstNet is in place to provide unrestricted access to communications and data to the emergency departments and first responders.

  4. #4
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    We get a decent hot spot

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    Ok, thanks!

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    also our plans are less than half what a consumer plan costs (mine is $45/month), we have unlimited Hotspot and none of our data will ever throttle until 3 months or more of heavy usage and even then if we have a valid reason it's overlooked

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mm View Post
    Precisely. The average user wouldn't notice the difference on a daily basis but if a major catastrophe or event happened somewhere, FirstNet is in place to provide unrestricted access to communications and data to the emergency departments and first responders.
    That's the theory of the FirstNet boondoggle. Hopefully Police and Fire would actually be doing their jobs and not using mobile data. FirstNet can act as a backup for TRS, but some calls/texts don't really clog up the network. At least AT&T made some delicious lemonade out of this otherwise idiotic federal boondoggle program that started post-9/11.

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    Precisely, during Sept 11th — I was in PA, let alone NY/NJ — and it was almost impossible to make landline calls, the internet barely worked (mostly didn’t) and cellular was dead in the water.

    These systems just don’t have the extra capacity for that kind of volume.

    Hurricane Sandy was similar, but for different reasons. Mostly infrastructure damage and power loss. I still had AT&T at my house (and FIOS, actually, when my generator was running) but because the few remains cell towers were so heavily loaded, it was difficult at times to make calls and use the internet — to load simple web pages — forget streaming.

    So I have to give T lots of props for making the right call in the FirstNet design and implementation. Assuming it works as planned, it makes the best out of both use cases (prime bandwidth that might have otherwise laid fallow most of the time)

    What I don’t fully understand is why T and Verizon have separate network cores — consumer, commercial, FirstNet this seems like an old way of doing things


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  9. #9
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    Verizon doesn’t have separate cores. All of their traffic is routed through a single core infrastructure.

    AT&T has two cores: commercial/consumer and FirstNet. The separate cores are part of the FirstNet requirements that came from the FirstNet Authority during the RFP. The separate cores are needed to: a) give FN customers their own dedicated core infrastructure with dedicated links to the internet backbone that are not shared with AT&T’s commercial/consumer traffic, b) allow for features not available to commercial/consumer customers, like Mission Critical Push to Talk.
    I do not represent any company or other entity. Anything I post in these forums or write on this site are my thoughts and opinions only. I make every attempt to be 100% accurate, but I am human and do make mistakes from time to time.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSchnee21 View Post
    Precisely, during Sept 11th — I was in PA, let alone NY/NJ — and it was almost impossible to make landline calls, the internet barely worked (mostly didn’t) and cellular was dead in the water.
    Remember, those were copper POTS and AMPS wireless systems, not modern IP-based systems. FirstNET is a solution in search of a problem, although it's still a pretty cool solution. The big benefit is that it gives AT&T more capacity virtually all of the time, emergency or not.

    Hurricane Sandy was similar, but for different reasons. Mostly infrastructure damage and power loss. I still had AT&T at my house (and FIOS, actually, when my generator was running) but because the few remains cell towers were so heavily loaded, it was difficult at times to make calls and use the internet — to load simple web pages — forget streaming.
    The secondary infrastructure loss is a much bigger concern now due to how much electronic equipment is out in the field and needs to be powered- cable nodes, remote OLTs, VRADs/RDSLAMs, cell towers, small cells, DAS.

    Quote Originally Posted by BMWDude49120 View Post
    AT&T has two cores: commercial/consumer and FirstNet. The separate cores are part of the FirstNet requirements that came from the FirstNet Authority during the RFP. The separate cores are needed to: a) give FN customers their own dedicated core infrastructure with dedicated links to the internet backbone that are not shared with AT&T’s commercial/consumer traffic, b) allow for features not available to commercial/consumer customers, like Mission Critical Push to Talk.
    It's a sort of bizarre system, but can FN users fall back to the commercial core if for some reason the FN core has problems? I'd assume both are highly redundant, but there can always be software bugs or configuration issues....

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