Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6
Results 76 to 81 of 81

Thread: Wifi calling or google voice?

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    California Gold Country
    Posts
    6,908
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    What you experienced with audio delay is likely correct. My experience with VOIP calling over Wifi has been that there is about a 600 ms round-trip delay. This is fairly consistent over a range of VOIP services.
    There can also be a difference in the delay (latency?) between the sending and receiving signals. Internet connections usually have a speed difference between upload and download, sometimes quite a lot. I see this calling a friends magicJack line. His Internet service often has very slow upload, so his voice transmission is garbled. His incoming signal (download) is fine.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    151
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by hpham View Post
    Not much different, the technology that's being used is still WiFi. When people refer to a location (Starbucks, Walmart, McDonald, hospital, library...) as a "hot spot", that just means the place provides public-access WiFi. You connect your devices to it using WiFi, with or without needing a password.

    When people refer to "using a phone as a hot spot", that means they're using their phone as a WiFi source for other devices. Let's say you're at a location that has no WiFi available (in a moving car, at a park, in a house with no WiFi hook up). Your phone can access the Internet using data, but you prefer to use your laptop or tablet because it has a bigger screen or is more functional. So you turn on the Hot Spot function on your phone, and it becomes a WiFi source, with its own SSID and password (if you want), basically your phone is now a router, and it uses data to obtain info from the Internet. You connect your laptop/tablet via WiFi to your phone's "router". When your laptop/tablet's browser requests info from the Internet, the request goes to the phone, then to the Internet. Your phone will eat up Data at a good rate, and the Hot Spot function is restricted/forbidden by some providers like Tracfone.
    Well, that is always how I saw things. And I have seen folks turn their cell into a "hotspot".

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    151
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by cv91913 View Post
    @CoyoteChris
    Think of a Hotspot as a router. It provides internet access using a cellular connection as opposed to your home router which uses a modem to provide an internet connection via your ISP. Once the connection is made they act the same.
    I am not saying you are incorrect but that is not what I am reading.
    http://www.differencebetween.net/tec...i-and-hotspot/

    A hotspot has nothing to do with using a cellular connection.

    In its simplest terms, wifi is a technology where your fone can connect to a router, and hence to the web. A hotspot is a physical location where this can occur, usually outside the home. People dont refer to their routers as "hotspots" but they really are. Its a matter of semantics. It also may have something to do with local jargon. I see lots of places in the Northwest advertise free wifi, like McDs and Starbucks and motel/hotels.

    NOW, having said all that, yes, there are entire cities that are wired for wifi hotspots no matter where you go. Spokane doesnt have that kind of integration but it has "28,000" (sic) wifi/hotspot places. Yeah, I dont see them either.
    https://www.wiman.me/united-states/free-wifi-spokane

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,442
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    I am not saying you are incorrect but that is not what I am reading.
    http://www.differencebetween.net/tec...i-and-hotspot/

    A hotspot has nothing to do with using a cellular connection.
    I thought we were talking about Hotspot in the context of mobile devices and creating a shareable connection to the internet. I have used various phones and a small standalone "Hotspot" device to allow WiFi access for some number of other devices to the internet. All of those "Hotspots" had a SIM. That said, there is nothing that says you have to use cellular. I guess you could connect your phone to the internet using your home router (or some public WiFi) and share that connection via the "Hotspot" functionality of the phone. Don't know, never crossed my mind to test that.

    I don't disagree with the article referenced in your links. I am seeing "Hotspot" as a device not a location.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    California Gold Country
    Posts
    6,908
    Feedback Score
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteChris View Post
    A hotspot has nothing to do with using a cellular connection.

    In its simplest terms, wifi is a technology where your fone can connect to a router, and hence to the web. A hotspot is a physical location where this can occur, usually outside the home. People dont refer to their routers as "hotspots" but they really are. Its a matter of semantics.
    Yes, the definitions are a matter of semantics. Public hotspots can use other types of feed like cable, satellite, microwave. I think the important application here is using a cellular connection to turn a phone into a WiFi hotspot to connect other devices to the Internet. It becomes a modem/router. The choice is often a matter of availability, and a cellular connection is overall the best.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Southwest Michigan, USA
    Posts
    3,560
    Device(s)
    Moto E (T-Mo); LG Fiesta 2 (PPC)
    Carrier(s)
    T-Mobile Prepaid & Page Plus
    Feedback Score
    0
    Some of the semantics have to do with how broad your understanding of the terminology is.

    In my view, whether you're referring to a "hotspot" or a home Wi-Fi router, from the end-user's standpoint you're always using Wi-Fi tech as the first link to that point of network access.

    A "hotspot" can be a public fixed location (all those public places) containing an access point (which could be either a literal dedicated network access point appliance, getting you on that business's or building's or even city's Local or Wide Area Network; or for smaller businesses something as simple as a garden variety home-type wireless router); or the term can refer to a portable hotspot such as either the little dedicated battery powered devices (commonly referred to by some as a Mi-Fi device) or a feature of your smartphone.

    Once the Wi-Fi grade link is made between the end device (your phone, tablet, laptop, etc.) and the point of access, the link to the Internet can be accomplished through any of several methods: cellular (for portable devices), or various hard- or quasi-hard-line approaches (cable, DSL, fiber, fixed terrestrial microwave link, satellite); however the provider chooses to get their internet service.

    Yes, too long of an answer, but that's how my mind works!

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6

Similar Threads

  1. Beta: WiFi calling with Google Voice
    By taoman in forum Google Voice
    Replies: 1040
    Last Post: 12-29-2019, 01:35 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-08-2019, 07:03 PM
  3. How do I enable wifi calling with Google Voice?
    By Relztrah in forum Google Voice
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-14-2018, 11:17 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-31-2011, 06:21 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-10-2010, 09:47 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks