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Thread: What will a plan b look like if no sprint?

  1. #16
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    What will a plan b look like if no sprint?

    Quote Originally Posted by Androided View Post
    Even we are TMobile users , we wish the merger fail.
    The merger is never good for customers. Less competition means less options and high price

    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
    True but I think T-Mobile will fall behind (only temporarily)if they don’t get sprints spectrum. They would probably be outbid in the auctions or a decent chance they would be

    They can still get to where they want to be but will take a lot longer

    To me it seems like the better option. I think prices are going up no matter what
    Last edited by themanhimself; 12-24-2019 at 03:25 PM.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Androided View Post
    Even we are TMobile users , we wish the merger fail.
    The merger is never good for customers. Less competition means less options and high price

    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
    it's hard to provide *less* competition than Sprint is providing right now. After the merger the resources of Sprint will actually increase the competitive picture and make T-Mobile much stronger against AT&T and Verizon.

    As T-Mobile users, we will see direct benefits pretty quick, because we will be able to use our phones on the Sprint towers. That results in less congestion for us and somewhat more coverage.

    As far as higher prices goes, there is no evidence for that, because the trend of cellular service has involved mergers accompanied with lowering prices and huge increase in value.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    As T-Mobile users, we will see direct benefits pretty quick, because we will be able to use our phones on the Sprint towers. That results in less congestion for us and somewhat more coverage.
    The speculation I've seen seems to indicate that use of current Sprint towers by T-Mobile users will be minimal, at least at first. More likely that Sprint users with compatible phones will get access to T-Mobile towers.

    I'm curious how it will play out. Use of Sprint bands can probably be upgraded to support VoLTE as phones get upgraded to support it on T-Mobile, and VoLTE get applied to Sprint users so they can use T-Mobile towers.
    iPhone 11 is my current primary phone. I have older model iPhones and Moto phones available on other lines. Currently prepaid, though would consider postpaid on right plan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Androided View Post
    Even we are TMobile users , we wish the merger fail.
    The merger is never good for customers. Less competition means less options and high price

    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
    Sprint is NOT competition. So the rest of your argument is moot. If you can't accept that simple premise the rest of your argument is just as likely to be incorrect. I almost wish the merger to fail so when the inevitable clusterf--k happens so I can do a big I told you so. But I rather have MORE competition and lower prices/better plans. Which only happens with a strong 3rd carrier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    Sprint is NOT competition. So the rest of your argument is moot. If you can't accept that simple premise the rest of your argument is just as likely to be incorrect. I almost wish the merger to fail so when the inevitable clusterf--k happens so I can do a big I told you so. But I rather have MORE competition and lower prices/better plans. Which only happens with a strong 3rd carrier.
    Jack your doing it again, try to be nice!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    Sprint is NOT competition. So the rest of your argument is moot. If you can't accept that simple premise the rest of your argument is just as likely to be incorrect. I almost wish the merger to fail so when the inevitable clusterf--k happens so I can do a big I told you so. But I rather have MORE competition and lower prices/better plans. Which only happens with a strong 3rd carrier.
    You are so rude..
    You should be banned out from here...

    Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    Sprint is NOT competition. So the rest of your argument is moot......
    Not competition for what? Assume that there are only three burger chains: Krystal, McDonald's and Five-Guys. McDonald's is proposing to buy up all the Krystals and convert them to McDs. Someone says that will reduce competition and someone else says, "Krystal is NOT competition. So, the rest....". Who does Krystal compete with? Well, they compete with the low-end of the McDonald's menu. Someone who has only a few bucks and wants something to eat may pick Krystal. They don't compete with Five-Guys at any level. Sprint competes at a similar level, particularly with their Boost prepaid offering. In this regard they help to keep prices down through price competition at the low end. I agree, they can't compete at the high end, either for service or coverage. But to make a blanket statement that they are not competition is clearly erroneous.
    Donald Newcomb

  8. #23
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    If the merger fails, T-Mo will have to seriously consider accelerated re-farming and/or acquisition of additional spectrum from somewhere. 5G 600MHz will be overloaded quickly if they are left with that outside very large cities.

    Sadly, the largest band of 5G mid-band spectrum we (as a nation) currently have will lie fallow even longer if the deal doesn't close. I don't see Sprint getting very far with it on their own. They are burning cash and have been for years.

    I agree that it will still be a while (a few years) even if the deal is closed in a month (wishful thinking on my part).

    But, really, for the foreseeable future, I have no need of 5G speeds. Just keep going with LTE so I can reliably get even 5Mbps in 98% of sub-urban places. That's all I want.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotABiot View Post
    it's hard to provide *less* competition than Sprint is providing right now. After the merger the resources of Sprint will actually increase the competitive picture and make T-Mobile much stronger against AT&T and Verizon.

    As T-Mobile users, we will see direct benefits pretty quick, because we will be able to use our phones on the Sprint towers. That results in less congestion for us and somewhat more coverage.

    As far as higher prices goes, there is no evidence for that, because the trend of cellular service has involved mergers accompanied with lowering prices and huge increase in value.
    Sprint provides price pressure as competition, because they are the lowest priced carrier (and apparently the lowest priced wholesaler to MVNOs, which offers even more competition.) That goes away eventually (as MVNO contracts expire) after a merger.

    As for the Sprint spectrum fixing congestion, I'm not sure we all get to argue that Sprint has such a sh*t network they can't afford to fix it out of one side out our mouths, then also get to argue access to it will improve the experience for T-Mo customers out of the other!

    And what trend of prior cellular mergers has lowered prices? Prices for the most part are set by downward pressure from low cost carriers (typically T-Mo, Sprint, or MVNOs).

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    Quote Originally Posted by elecconnec View Post
    And what trend of prior cellular mergers has lowered prices?
    Prices were higher before six carriers became four. Talk plans were measured in minutes with overages if you exceeded your plan. Prices went down after AT&T Wireless merged with Cingular and Sprint merged with Nextel.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    Prices were higher before six carriers became four. Talk plans were measured in minutes with overages if you exceeded your plan. Prices went down after AT&T Wireless merged with Cingular.....
    Not exactly.

    Cingular was founded by BellSouth and SBC. Cingular bought AT&T Wireless in 2006. Next BellSouth was purchased by SBC (Southwestern Bell) and changed the name to the current At&t Mobility (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BellSouth, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AT%26T...gular_Wireless).
    Don't make me turn this car around.....

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    Prices were higher before six carriers became four. Talk plans were measured in minutes with overages if you exceeded your plan. Prices went down after AT&T Wireless merged with Cingular and Sprint merged with Nextel.
    That was the passage of time and Moore's law, not the consolidations per se. (Though admittedly, consolidation of large regional carriers into national carriers led to consistent nationwide pricing which did tend to lower prices in higher-priced rural areas. Metro areas already benefitted from multi-carrier competition.)

    Crediting the AT&T/Cingular merger or the Bell Atlantic/GTE (Verizon) merger for lower prices would like arguing that the higher fuel efficiency of modern cars was the result of mergers and consolidations in the automotive industry between 1900 and 2019, rather than on technological improvements and regulation.

    Even if we choose to credit those mergers with better pricing, the circumstances aren't similar here. In those days, carriers were regional, and consolidation created national carriers. Relatively few markets had both AT&T Wireless and Cingular as competitors, and the dozen or two that did typically were typically forced to divest the customers and network of one of the companies to a competitor. (E.g. Cingular's 1900MHz GSM holdings in California became T-Mo's as a result of the merger, when they acquired AT&T's 800MHz TDMA network.)

    The T-Mo/Sprint merger, OTOH, directly impacts every market they operate in.

    [As an aside, I'll repeat that unlike most people here against the merger, my problem with the reduced competition isn't necessarily because of the reduction of the number of carriers, but in the leveling of their sizes. The disparity of size/quality in carriers leads to a variety of value propositions in wireless (less coverage/less price, etc.) that will disappear if we are left with 3 more or less equally sized carriers when the dust clears. (Again, I'll drag out the tired analog of air travel- pricing for "premium" tier carriers is virtually identical, but value carriers offer discounted rates for discounted levels service, typically with limited "coverage areas".)]

    "Value" wireless service is provided by the crappiest carriers (Sprint, and to a lesser extent, T-Mo) and those pre-paid brands and MVNOs created to compete with them (e.g. Cricket, offering deprioritized, throttled AT&T service at a discount.)

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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by veriztd View Post
    Cingular bought AT&T Wireless in 2006.
    Right. And prices were higher for the service before than they were afterwards.

    Quote Originally Posted by elecconnec View Post
    That was the passage of time and Moore's law, not the consolidations per se.
    That's just more excuses. It's not as if Moore's law is irrelevant today with the release of technologies like 5G. And with the release of those technologies it makes sense that there are three strong competitors who are able to get the most out of that deployment. It's not like it's feasible to go back to six nationwide carriers, as there once were, just for the sake of competition. There's not enough spectrum, there's not enough customers to meet the economy of scale necessary for such deployment.

    But if you're so dedicated to this principle of less money for bad coverage, why haven't you switched to Sprint? Why are you still with T-Mobile? Sprint would seem to be the embodiment of the carrier with the ideals you desire. You could've saved a lot of money with Sprint over the years if you had hopped onto one of their ridiculously low-priced plans. And perhaps if you, and others like you had supported them, they wouldn't be in the position they are today.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    But if you're so dedicated to this principle of less money for bad coverage, why haven't you switched to Sprint? Why are you still with T-Mobile? Sprint would seem to be the embodiment of the carrier with the ideals you desire. You could've saved a lot of money with Sprint over the years if you had hopped onto one of their ridiculously low-priced plans. And perhaps if you, and others like you had supported them, they wouldn't be in the position they are today.
    I'm not suggesting I'm always looking for the lowest price, but I am usually looking for the best value. When I occasionally go to McDonald's, I know I can get a cheaper lunch at Taco Bell. But I prefer McDonald's, and appreciate the fact that McDonald's prices are that much lower because of the competition other restaurants like Taco Bell creates.

    In wireless, for me the best value is T-Mo. Between my grandfathered plan, and the far greater freedom of T-Mo's device policies (I switch SIMs between devices often, use a variety of unlocked devices and would be extremely frustrated with Sprint's policies) Sprint isn't really an option for me. (I did take the free year they offered a while a ago to use in a backup device and rarely if ever used it. It worked fine the few times I tried it.)

    Having said all that, it's good that there is a Sprint- both for those who need it, and those like you and me who benefit from the competitive pressure they bring to bear on the carriers they do use.



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  15. #30
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    If the government blocks this corrupt and horrible merger, than life goes on for T-Mobile. Maybe they could try and merge with DISH again. The Comcast idea is kind of loony, although it's possible. It's more likely that Comcast would want to buy Sprint along with Charter and Altice. Something will happen from an M&A perspective, but T-Mobile itself can keep going on profitably.

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