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Thread: What Is Verizon Doing To Expand Their Network Coverage?

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    What Is Verizon Doing To Expand Their Network Coverage?

    As posted above, what is Verizon doing to expand their coverage? I am a Total Wireless subscriber, which is a Verizon MVNO. I hear and read a lot about AT&T and T-Mobile expanding, but I don't hear much about Verizon. Are they expanding the number of towers? Will AT&T leapfrog over them in coverage or will Verizon hold their lead by adding more towers of their own?

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    They are most definitely expanding they added an antenna recently to an originally an AT&T only tower in an area that had fringe coverage for years


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    ATT (Nebraska, for instance) and T-Mobile (Nebraska, for instance ), had obvious spots for expansion. Verizon already had better national coverage (with LTEira) so wasn't as critical for coverage. Just need to improve capacity in some spots. Which is less visible.
    iPhone 11 is my current primary phone. I have older model iPhones and Moto phones available on other lines. Trying to simplify to 2 prepaid lines, one on the Verizon network and a limited minute plan on ATT to improve coverage area. 12 month plans to help me fight the urge to switch. The good old days of contracts where you had to pay a hefty ETF to leave

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    I know a big focus is 5g now

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    LTE its the network !

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    Verizon isn’t doing anything here is South Orange County California because it is NIMBY Land. I don’t think we will ever see additional cell sites or 5g here.

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    They spent years going wide with coverage and now the last 5 or so has largely been focusing on coverage depth. They’re still building new macros in my area and we already have a relatively dense grid.

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    Here in the eastern Iowa area, they've added a bunch of band 4 sites in Iowa City within the last year or so, they originally had about a dozen sites city-wide (and added 4 or 5 more around the kinnick stadium a few years back but not a lot else), now they've got band 4 sites about every 3 or 4 blocks. Coralville added a site. I've seen band 13, 4, 5, and 2 on these sites so they're adding plenty of bands to them. Going along highway 151 to Madison, I'd get about 10mbps a year or two ago; within the last year it was down to like 1-3mbps, band 13 only the whole way other than through Dubuque. Just a few days ago I went up there, saw band 4 several times in the rural areas, saw band 4 or 2 in several towns that were band 13 only just a few months ago; speeds were back up to about 10mbps. One of the towns that used to get about 1 bar and 1mbps now has 2 cell sites in it, loads of signal now. They are definitely still upgrading existing sites and adding new sites.

    Expanding coverage? Well, in Alaska they had no cellular or PCS licenses, so no network at all pre-LTE. With LTE and VoLTE they now have a network up there and sell service. Other than that I don't know how aggressively they are building out new coverage (i.e. really new coverage, not filling in coverage holes in their existing coverage areas). They've got more extensive coverage than AT&T, T-Mo, or Sprint as it stands.

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    I guess network expansion depends a lot on your definition. For me, I'm interested in seeing the footprint (geographically) that I can use my phone expand.

    The reason I make this distinction:
    1- Verizon has (by some people's measure) expanded in my home state of Oregon by multiple acquisitions of local carriers over the years. None of those has changed places where I can use my phone, and in fact, all areas had friendly roaming (back when that was a distinction).
    2- Verizon is continually needing to expand existing coverage in towns and cities when new neighborhoods get built. Some slower, some faster but eventually they tend to grow into new areas of cities. So if this counts as geographic expansion, yep, happens all the time.

    The only geographic expansion I've witnessed (by my own definition of such) is the previously mentioned new network in Alaska. And even that one has some/many places where one could previously use their phone (through roaming).

    Expansion? Not so much, at least of what I call "expansion" (i.e. new places I can use my phone). What I have seen is the existing footprint go through many upgrades. i.e. data speeds from 1G, 2G, 3G, 4G, ... etc.

    In short, the carriers (including Verizon) build based on population. Areas deemed not profitable to build (and in my home state speaking geographically, that's still a giant chunk) just don't get built. And not all these areas are extreme remote, many are 20 minutes from the Interstate. Places like South and East of Cottage Grove (Row river road), Creswell, Mohawk valley, and neighboring communities to Eugene/Springfield, OR where I live. But these are the places with zero cellular service.

    But yeah, Oregon is a place with hundreds and hundreds of miles of no cellular signal. In fact in my community (west-central oregon), one need only drive about 20 minutes to find a spot that no cellular company covers. It happens here all the time, and yep somehow we manage without cellular phones, but I would love to see those areas get covered. And I've stated this before over the years, but the cellular maps very inaccurate, but one must actually travel to rural/remote areas to verify this statement which isn't convenient for folks to do. There's a lot more cellular dead regions than most folks realize. There's also a lot of city dwellers that don't really explore (so simply don't know the truth I'm speaking).
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalbrich View Post
    I guess network expansion depends a lot on your definition. For me, I'm interested in seeing the footprint (geographically) that I can use my phone expand.

    The reason I make this distinction:
    1- Verizon has (by some people's measure) expanded in my home state of Oregon by multiple acquisitions of local carriers over the years. None of those has changed places where I can use my phone, and in fact, all areas had friendly roaming (back when that was a distinction).
    2- Verizon is continually needing to expand existing coverage in towns and cities when new neighborhoods get built. Some slower, some faster but eventually they tend to grow into new areas of cities. So if this counts as geographic expansion, yep, happens all the time.

    The only geographic expansion I've witnessed (by my own definition of such) is the previously mentioned new network in Alaska. And even that one has some/many places where one could previously use their phone (through roaming).

    Expansion? Not so much, at least of what I call "expansion" (i.e. new places I can use my phone). What I have seen is the existing footprint go through many upgrades. i.e. data speeds from 1G, 2G, 3G, 4G, ... etc.

    In short, the carriers (including Verizon) build based on population. Areas deemed not profitable to build (and in my home state speaking geographically, that's still a giant chunk) just don't get built. And not all these areas are extreme remote, many are 20 minutes from the Interstate. Places like South and East of Cottage Grove (Row river road), Creswell, Mohawk valley, and neighboring communities to Eugene/Springfield, OR where I live. But these are the places with zero cellular service.

    But yeah, Oregon is a place with hundreds and hundreds of miles of no cellular signal. In fact in my community (west-central oregon), one need only drive about 20 minutes to find a spot that no cellular company covers. It happens here all the time, and yep somehow we manage without cellular phones, but I would love to see those areas get covered. And I've stated this before over the years, but the cellular maps very inaccurate, but one must actually travel to rural/remote areas to verify this statement which isn't convenient for folks to do. There's a lot more cellular dead regions than most folks realize. There's also a lot of city dwellers that don't really explore (so simply don't know the truth I'm speaking).
    To expand to rural areas would require new towers which are much more expensive to deploy and maintain than small cells. If as you say there is small population and if it's not near a major highway or some tourist area then can you really expect any company to pour the funds into building in such an area? Also carriers need PERMISSION to build and many of these places are run by NIMBYs who don't want "ugly" towers near them.

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    I live in one of those highly populated areas in Southern Orange County California that is run by NIMBYs that are worried about cancer. Many neighborhoods get less than one bar of signal from towers many miles away. This situation will not change in the near future. 5g?, forget about it in this area!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalbrich View Post
    .

    In short, the carriers (including Verizon) build based on population. Areas deemed not profitable to build (and in my home state speaking geographically, that's still a giant chunk) just don't get built. And not all these areas are extreme remote, many are 20 minutes from the Interstate. Places like South and East of Cottage Grove (Row river road), Creswell, Mohawk valley, and neighboring communities to Eugene/Springfield, OR where I live. But these are the places with zero cellular service.

    But yeah, Oregon is a place with hundreds and hundreds of miles of no cellular signal. In fact in my community (west-central oregon), one need only drive about 20 minutes to find a spot that no cellular company covers. It happens here all the time, and yep somehow we manage without cellular phones, but I would love to see those areas get covered. And I've stated this before over the years, but the cellular maps very inaccurate, but one must actually travel to rural/remote areas to verify this statement which isn't convenient for folks to do. There's a lot more cellular dead regions than most folks realize. There's also a lot of city dwellers that don't really explore (so simply don't know the truth I'm speaking).
    The same up here in NorCal, especially where I live, Northwest California. Thankfully, we do have a strong Highway Callbox program in Mendocino County, they hook directly into the CHP, use cellular or satellite for service, are self-contained and are powered by battery and solar, they are located every 2-3 miles on the state and federal highways here, they provide help in areas with unusable to no cell service, and we have plenty of those, even on main highways like US 101 and CA 20. I only have to drive a few minutes from our place in Redwood Valley to get to a cellular dead zone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    To expand to rural areas would require new towers which are much more expensive to deploy and maintain than small cells. If as you say there is small population and if it's not near a major highway or some tourist area then can you really expect any company to pour the funds into building in such an area? Also carriers need PERMISSION to build and many of these places are run by NIMBYs who don't want "ugly" towers near them.
    Where do you live?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilvla2 View Post
    Where do you live?
    Why does that matter. But without being specific I live in county of 16,000 surround by 8 others with populations ranging from 8,000 to just under 35,000. In other words pretty rural.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilvla2 View Post
    The same up here in NorCal, especially where I live, Northwest California. Thankfully, we do have a strong Highway Callbox program in Mendocino County, they hook directly into the CHP, use cellular or satellite for service, are self-contained and are powered by battery and solar, they are located every 2-3 miles on the state and federal highways here, they provide help in areas with unusable to no cell service, and we have plenty of those, even on main highways like US 101 and CA 20. I only have to drive a few minutes from our place in Redwood Valley to get to a cellular dead zone.
    I noticed that sometimes they use directional antennas, presumably where cellular service is too weak for the unidirectional antennas, but is usable with a directional antenna.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1348 View Post
    As posted above, what is Verizon doing to expand their coverage? I am a Total Wireless subscriber, which is a Verizon MVNO. I hear and read a lot about AT&T and T-Mobile expanding, but I don't hear much about Verizon. Are they expanding the number of towers? Will AT&T leapfrog over them in coverage or will Verizon hold their lead by adding more towers of their own?
    They seem to be filling any gaps in areas in which they provide service, though those gaps are very minor compared to T-Mobile, Sprint, and AT&T.

    There are areas where they have no presence at all and rely on roaming on rural carriers. It isn't clear if Total Wireless/Tracfone customers get that LTEiRA (Rural LTE alliance) coverage. I have not traveled into one of those areas since I switched to Total Wireless.

    A Hofo post from 2016 states "Anecdotal reports say LTEiRA works with all Vzw MVNOs. But without specific testing and reporting, it's hard to say." A post from a year ago states "I know I can use two of the LTEiRA areas with VoLTE near me on my Straight Talk phone with no issues."

    I wish that I had an LTEIRA area near me so I could test this.

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