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Thread: Samsung and Apple have established a firm duopoly on the US phone market

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    Samsung and Apple have established a firm duopoly on the US phone market

    https://www.phonearena.com/news/Surv...Apple_id121341

    More than 90% of the phones sold at each of the four major carriers' stores were either made by Apple or Samsung, according to a new store survey done by analysis firm Wave7 Research and reported first by PC Mag. The study confirms earlier reports and shows that despite the buzz around the latest phones by companies such as Google, OnePlus and others, the US market is largely dominated by Apple and Samsung. It's a duopoly that has not changed much in the last few years.

    Apple and Samsung phones made up a whopping 95% of all the phones sold at AT&T stores, 94% of the phones sold at Verizon stores, 94% over at Sprint and 91% at T-Mobile stores, according to this report.


    The most popular phone sold at carrier stores was the iPhone 11, while the most popular Android phone was the Samsung Galaxy S10.


    A very, very distant third was Google's family of Pixel phones that grabbed between 2% and 4% depending on the carrier, while OnePlus got the fourth place with 2.3%, largely thanks to the OnePlus 7T Pro McLaren Edition sold at T-Mobile stores.

    These numbers once again show just how much of a hold Apple and Samsung have on the US market and how things are just not changing.


    It's worth pointing out that carrier stores control the overwhelming majority of US postpaid phone sales, selling between 85% and 90% of the phones, with only between 10% to 15% of postpaid sales happening via other channels like Amazon, Best Buy and the rest.


    Postpaid, or contract, subscribers are the most profitable customers for carriers and this is largely the number that matters for revenues. Latest publicly available data from Q3 2018 estimated that there are 267 million postpaid mobile subscribers in the US and only 46 million customers on prepaid. Typically, prepaid plans are cheaper and are preferred by customers from lower income households that are also generally not buying high-end phones. This latest report confirms this: for example, over at MetroPCS, Samsung, LG and Motorola were the top sellers in the first half of December, while Boost Mobile was selling mostly iPhone and Samsung phones, but the LG Stylo 5 was ranked as the fifth most popular phone there.



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    Your statistics sure illustrate how many consumers are too lazy to do their own research. Most people would do just fine with an LG or Moto for 1/4 the price of the iPhones/Samsungs. Very few users will actually use the extra features of the high priced phones.

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    Having gone through several iphones over the years and having tried out a couple of Samsung phones recently, I can honestly say that I am happy with what I've got for the first time in years...Pixel 3a. The reception on the iphones leave a lot to be desired and the Samsungs are so bloated with redundant crap that I hated them. This $400 Pixel 3a has better reception, audio quality, and anything else that I can think of and costs about half what an iphone or top Samusng phones cost.

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    This thread topic sounds a lot like saying that Microsoft and Apple have a duopoly on operating systems on computers or Intel and AMD on computer microprocessors. There are other competing systems out there and nobody is forced to use only the leaders, it would be very difficult to try to break it up. In this case, it is up to the marketplace and consumers do have choices out there. You can't legislate away this type of competition easily.
    Don't make me turn this car around.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by californiajay View Post
    Having gone through several iphones over the years and having tried out a couple of Samsung phones recently, I can honestly say that I am happy with what I've got for the first time in years...Pixel 3a. The reception on the iphones leave a lot to be desired and the Samsungs are so bloated with redundant crap that I hated them. This $400 Pixel 3a has better reception, audio quality, and anything else that I can think of and costs about half what an iphone or top Samusng phones cost.
    If you can do without wifi calling and NFC, you might also look into the selection of Moto phones at around $200. Great reception and battery life. My last three phones have been Moto and I've been very pleased with them. Also, you can buy them unlocked and they'll work on any carrier and don't have all of the bloatware.

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    Before Apple and Samsung, wasn't it Nokia and Motorola ??

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    Thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by shortyd999 View Post
    Before Apple and Samsung, wasn't it Nokia and Motorola ??

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    ...for reinforcing my point. This is better left up to the consumer and the marketplace. That didn't happen because of government legislation, Motorola and Nokia merely didn't keep up with the evolution of the cell phone until it was too late.

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    Quote Originally Posted by veriztd View Post
    ...for reinforcing my point. This is better left up to the consumer and the marketplace. That didn't happen because of government legislation, Motorola and Nokia merely didn't keep up with the evolution of the cell phone until it was too late.
    I’m am an Apple guy simply because I like the iOS ecosystem, but back in the day I always liked Nokia. Motorola not so much. It’s to bad Nokia wasn’t innovative enough to get into the smartphone business. They probably would’ve made a great smart phone.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRC72 View Post
    It’s to bad Nokia wasn’t innovative enough to get into the smartphone business. They probably would’ve made a great smart phone.
    Umm, they were. They did.

    Before the iPhone created a paradigm shift (touch/skeumorphism) Nokia had some very talented phones. Their 9500 offered HTML Web pages and a full keyboard years before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone. I had an E Series in the mid '00s that ran pretty solid on Symbian and had all the apps you could get on iOS and Android -- Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, YouTube, ... plus a real useable keyboard and a few days of battery life before recharging. There even was a Nokia store though you weren't limited to the "walled garden".

    Nokia never sold well in the U.S., though, because CDMA handsets were a second line for them; they refused to bend to carriers like Verizon imposing their bloatware and UI skins over what Nokia and the rest of the world figured out was good; and they suffered from terminal indecision when they realized that touch was the way to go and Symbian wasn't able to do that well.

    They messed around with too many OS options while iPhone (and, eventually, Android) took off and by then they'd lost critical mass. They then also gained Stephen Elop, formerly of Microsoft, who wrote the famous "burning platform" memo that effectively killed the company, announcing an end to Symbian development/products without announcing a new direction. Who'd buy anything but a Nokia feature phone under those circumstances?

    I hung on to my E72 until critical apps and security updates were history. By then there were some model and carrier options for the iPhone so I went that way. But I loved that E Series phone. Nokia made a damn good smartphone. Once.

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    Samsung and Apple have established a firm duopoly on the US phone market

    Quote Originally Posted by Steveinmn View Post
    Umm, they were. They did.

    Before the iPhone created a paradigm shift (touch/skeumorphism) Nokia had some very talented phones. Their 9500 offered HTML Web pages and a full keyboard years before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone. I had an E Series in the mid '00s that ran pretty solid on Symbian and had all the apps you could get on iOS and Android -- Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, YouTube, ... plus a real useable keyboard and a few days of battery life before recharging. There even was a Nokia store though you weren't limited to the "walled garden".

    Nokia never sold well in the U.S., though, because CDMA handsets were a second line for them; they refused to bend to carriers like Verizon imposing their bloatware and UI skins over what Nokia and the rest of the world figured out was good; and they suffered from terminal indecision when they realized that touch was the way to go and Symbian wasn't able to do that well.

    They messed around with too many OS options while iPhone (and, eventually, Android) took off and by then they'd lost critical mass. They then also gained Stephen Elop, formerly of Microsoft, who wrote the famous "burning platform" memo that effectively killed the company, announcing an end to Symbian development/products without announcing a new direction. Who'd buy anything but a Nokia feature phone under those circumstances?

    I hung on to my E72 until critical apps and security updates were history. By then there were some model and carrier options for the iPhone so I went that way. But I loved that E Series phone. Nokia made a damn good smartphone. Once.
    I always liked Nokia, but they missed the boat on the smartphones era. Sure they made a few, but not enough to compete. Face it Apple and Samsung innovated and won the market share because of it.

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    If the new Motorola Razr wasn't priced so silly, it might be able to have the same impact as the original. Likely... No, but possible.

    Phones have become such a social symbol, that no one really wants to be seen or use anything different than Apple or Samsung. I don't see this changing anytime soon.


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    shortyd999- thanks for starting this thread - fascinating!

    In my case, virtually everyone in the extended family ( 3 generations ) have iPhones. Interoperability, communication

    via iMessage & FaceTime, plethora of apps, availability of 2-3 year old models with continued updates, reasonable resale

    pricing, stable iOS, multi carrier use if you buy the correct model, etc.... are what keeps me coming back to IPhone.

    BUT as others have said above, perhaps Pixal has better reception than iPhones , Motorola has better pricing for the

    features most folks use, and both Samsung & Apple have done a better job with innovation to capture market share.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRC72 View Post
    I always liked Nokia, but they missed the boat on the smartphones era. Sure they made a few, but not enough to compete. Face it Apple and Samsung innovated and won the market share because of it.
    Oh, no doubt -- on all counts. Students in business schools in future years will be reading about how Nokia and RIM/Blackberry were kings of the hill and fell -- hard.

    I'm loathe to give Samsung a lot of credit for "innovation" because, tbh, LG or Sony or even a faster-moving Nokia or Motorola could have grabbed Android -- an OS none of them created or maintain -- early and become what Samsung is now in the mobile phone space. Don't get me wrong; Samsung makes some excellent hardware (phones and other stuff), but everything I've owned with the LG name on it has been pretty bulletproof, too, and they could scale up global production just as widely as Samsung has. Sony, too, though their stuff has been a bit problematic over the years and they have had a terrible "not-invented-here" problem in the past.

    Samsung had a little luck on their side. When they've tried to be "innovative" (Tizen, first folding smartphone) they haven't exactly had a clean getaway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steveinmn View Post
    Samsung had a little luck on their side. When they've tried to be "innovative" (Tizen, first folding smartphone) they haven't exactly had a clean getaway.
    Tizen wasn't a phone.

    Tizen (/ˈtaɪzɛn/) is a Linux-based mobile operating system backed by the Linux Foundation but developed and used primarily by Samsung Electronics.

    The project was originally conceived as an HTML5-based platform for mobile devices to succeed MeeGo. Samsung merged its previous Linux-based OS effort, Bada, into Tizen, and has since used it primarily on platforms such as wearable devices and smart TVs.
    You can read more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tizen

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    Quote Originally Posted by veriztd View Post
    ...for reinforcing my point. This is better left up to the consumer and the marketplace. That didn't happen because of government legislation, Motorola and Nokia merely didn't keep up with the evolution of the cell phone until it was too late.
    This discussion could be improved if include, the four most popular brands of smartphones.

    (After seeing further threads posts of the topic, I see now a few of them are mentioned.)
    Last edited by joseg2016; 01-19-2020 at 01:09 PM. Reason: strike-through and better vocabulary for better meaning

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