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Thread: T-Mobile Leases More 600 MHz spectrum!

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    T-Mobile Leases More 600 MHz spectrum!

    They inked out yet another lease agreement.

    This time it’s with Columbia Capital Investment Firm and it’s for 3 years!

    10-30 MHz in several large markets!


    https://www.fiercewireless.com/opera...lumbia-capital



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    “The Internet wasn’t meant to be metered in bits and bytes, so it’s insane that wireless companies are still making you buy it this way. The rate plan is dead — it’s a fossil from a time when wireless was metered by every call or text.” John Legere 1/5/2017

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    Go T-Mobile Go!


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    San Fran is still in the dark on its 600MHz due to TV.
    Some details on FCC
    https://wireless2.fcc.gov/UlsApp/App...pplID=11988312
    AT&T... your world, throttled.

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    I’m not a spectrum guy so here’s my question:

    Even though low band spectrum is said to have lower capacity... if the channel is wide enough could it theoretically produce 300 Mbps speeds for some users?? ( Assuming backhaul is adequate)


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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    I’m not a spectrum guy so here’s my question:

    Even though low band spectrum is said to have lower capacity... if the channel is wide enough could it theoretically produce 300 Mbps speeds for some users?? ( Assuming backhaul is adequate)


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    A quick search shows that if they Carrier Aggregation and 20 x 20 Mimo they can hit at least 200 Mbps with 600mhz.

    Now with 600mhz being used in rural areas, it’s hard telling if the reached a peak speak of 300 Mbps how consistent that would be.


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    Quote Originally Posted by techfranz View Post
    A quick search shows that if they Carrier Aggregation and 20 x 20 Mimo they can hit at least 200 Mbps with 600mhz.

    Now with 600mhz being used in rural areas, it’s hard telling if the reached a peak speak of 300 Mbps how consistent that would be.


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    Thank you!




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    Not a bad move by Columbia Capital with all the FCC spectrum sales coming in the next year that would reduce the value of their spectrum. Verizon didn’t even bid on 600 MHz most likely because 600 MHz doesn’t play well in carrier Aggression with both Verizon and AT&T’s 700 MHz.

    So now T-Mobile owns Sprint and all their spectrum except Band 12 works with 600 MHz in carrier aggression. In three years maybe something changes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by techfranz View Post
    A quick search shows that if they Carrier Aggregation and 20 x 20 Mimo they can hit at least 200 Mbps with 600mhz.

    Now with 600mhz being used in rural areas, it’s hard telling if the reached a peak speak of 300 Mbps how consistent that would be.


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    No such thing as 20X20 MIMO and definitely not with lowband. Heck they are still using 2x2. AT best you'll get 4X4 if they use QAM 20X20 can be 400 Mbps

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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    They inked out yet another lease agreement.

    This time it’s with Columbia Capital Investment Firm and it’s for 3 years!

    10-30 MHz in several large markets!


    https://www.fiercewireless.com/opera...lumbia-capital



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    That 10-30 MHz includes upload. So it's 5 MHz-15 MHz downlink.

    Despite what the article says the areas I can see that LB has licenses are Seattle, St Louis, SF/San Jose, Salt Lake City, Atlanta, Tampa, Minneapolis 5x5 MHz and Dallas at 15X15 MHz. many of these areas T-Mobile only had 10X10. So even 5X5 will help along with Dish's spectrum. In Dallas between their own spectrum, LB and Dish, T-Mobile will have access to the entire 35X35 MHz. Now if they were smart they'd keep at least 15X15 on 4G then have the other 20X20 on 5G and not have 5X5 on 4G and 30X30 on 5G. If T-Mobile can wrangle deals with the likes of New Level and Ch 51 they'd really be set

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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    I’m not a spectrum guy so here’s my question:

    Even though low band spectrum is said to have lower capacity...
    Capacity or bandwidth to move data is the same no matter what spectrum frequency level. Data speed is a function of wider or more MHz of contiguous spectrum. The amount of data transmitted is identical with the same physical MHz of spectrum no matter what the frequency of the spectrum. The only exception is contiguous blocks of spectrum are faster moving data than non-Contiguous blocks of spectrum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    Even though low band spectrum is said to have lower capacity... if the channel is wide enough could it theoretically produce 300 Mbps speeds for some users?? ( Assuming backhaul is adequate)....
    A MHz of low frequency has exactly the same capacity as a MHz of any other band. The problem is that there's less MHz available at lower frequencies than at higher.
    Donald Newcomb

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    A MHz of low frequency has exactly the same capacity as a MHz of any other band. The problem is that there's less MHz available at lower frequencies than at higher.
    Yup.. that and the overall characteristics. High(er) bands are better for more urban and spectrum reuse, while lower bands typically are better suited for more rural areas.

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    Curious. How much of the 600 goes to 5G and how much of it goes to 4G?

    Or is it all 5G with 4G backwards compatibility like a 802.11n device connected to a 802.11ac router...?
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    Quote Originally Posted by techguru View Post
    Curious. How much of the 600 goes to 5G and how much of it goes to 4G?

    Or is it all 5G with 4G backwards compatibility like a 802.11n device connected to a 802.11ac router...?
    With their own spectrum they leave a measly 5X5 MHz on 4G and whatever they have left goes to 5G. In some areas that's as little as another 5X5. In most areas it's 10X10 some areas it's as high as 20X20. How that will change with their leases is anyone's guess. One would hope that they dedicate at least 10X10 for 4G. I mean in places like Dallas they are going to have the entre 35X35 swath of band 17. Surely they can leave at least 10X10 on 4G.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    With their own spectrum they leave a measly 5X5 MHz on 4G and whatever they have left goes to 5G. In some areas that's as little as another 5X5. In most areas it's 10X10 some areas it's as high as 20X20. How that will change with their leases is anyone's guess. One would hope that they dedicate at least 10X10 for 4G. I mean in places like Dallas they are going to have the entre 35X35 swath of band 17. Surely they can leave at least 10X10 on 4G.
    As a Sprint account holder I'm trying to determine if it's worth upgrading my iPhone 6s to the new iPhone SE for the additional band support right now or should I wait for a 5G iPhone to come out...

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