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Thread: Do Verizon / T-mobile use the same frequencies

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    Do Verizon / T-mobile use the same frequencies

    Sorry for this really basic question...

    Do both T-mobile and Verizon use the same frequencies in the 1700/2100 MHz (AWS) band or does each carrier use a different frequency range within that band? (depending on location?)

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    Do Verizon / T-mobile use the same frequencies

    Each carrier owns a different blocks (or chucks) of a certain kind of wireless spectrum. This way, signals aren’t overlapping & carriers have spectrum available to themselves so they’re not required to share.

    So to answer your question, they all use different frequencies within the same band.


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    T-Mobile and Verizon each have some frequencies (bands) that the other does not use. For instance, Verizon has pretty much exclusive use of the upper 700 MHz band (13), at least in the contiguous US. Verizon sold all their lower 700 MHz (band 12) licenses to T-Mobile and hence, does not use band 12. T-Mobile picked up 2.5 GHz (band 41) and the PCS-G block (band 25) when they merged with Sprint, which are both now fairly unique to T-Mobile. Verizon uses a lot of 850 MHz cellular (band 5), of which T-Mobile has only one license covering a few counties.

    It might help if you told us why you are interested.
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    Thanks! Mainly curious as I didn't know if carriers would ever share frequencies within the 1700/2100 MHz AWS band.

    Practically, I placed a t-mobile device a couple weeks ago about one foot from my existing verizon device, and noticed they were both liking 1700/2100 best, and was curious if there was any chance one would in any way interfere with the other if they both uploaded at the same moment for example. I have been tweaking the antennas separately for best performance, and the thought occurred to me, I wonder if there would be any interference. Both seem to have settled separately on the 1700/2100 band and the antennas work best in an area that is only a couple feet in my house, so the two antennas are very close.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lake Michigan View Post
    ...... and was curious if there was any chance one would in any way interfere with the other if they both uploaded at the same moment for example.....
    If two phones are back-to-back, there could be something undefined happen.

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    i wouldn't worry about cell phones interfering with each other too much. I have an old Virgin Mobile and T-Mobile phone that operate on 1900 MHz. Yeah, I grew up even before 3G UMTS became popular. These old phones don't interfere with each other. I worry more about LTE phones interfering with computer speakers. Buzz...zzz buzz.

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    I remember when I first got a cordless phone (between the phone and the base station) in an apartment building 25 years ago. During a call you would sometimes have to hit the channel button a few times to switch channels to a clear one!

    Is there a good list somewhere that shows the actual frequencies in the AWS 1700/2100 4/66 band in use by the different carriers?

    (I haven't actually observed any interference; just curious how it all works!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by starionwolf View Post
    i wouldn't worry about cell phones interfering with each other too much. I have an old Virgin Mobile and T-Mobile phone that operate on 1900 MHz. Yeah, I grew up even before 3G UMTS became popular. These old phones don't interfere with each other.
    It's been a long time since bleeding over was common. My first cell phone was TDMA/Analog and it would do that in busy areas. Much cruder band control back then.

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    Modern cell phone radios have excellent selectively & interference/overload are rare. Still amazes me how far cell technology has come in the last 10 years.

    I've always been an antenna geek.



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    AWS, VZW and T-Mo own different chunks within a given band (if they both have some in a license area) but for phone compatibility purposes it's the same band and (for LTE) is compatible. These licenses are usually not nationwide so, they don't have all bands in all markets by any means.

    VZW was originally band 5 (cellular) with some band 2 (1900 PCS). T-Mo was originally band 2 (1900 PCS). Band 5 was originally analog (but alreadly mostly converted to some type of digital service by the time Verizon Wireless formed...), band 2 started with whatever 2G system the carrier preferred (CDMA or GSM). They both have band 4 (AWS) spectrum as well, T-Mobile originally ran 3G on this band. Probably both have band 66 (extended AWS). Really band 2 and 4 (and maybe 66) are the common bands between the two.

    In terms of low band (other than band 5), Verizon has nation wide band 13 (700mhz C block), T-Mobile has band 12 (700mhz) licenses and band 71 (600mhz) nation wide.

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    Practically, I placed a t-mobile device a couple weeks ago about one foot from my existing verizon device, and noticed they were both liking 1700/2100 best, and was curious if there was any chance one would in any way interfere with the other if they both uploaded at the same moment for example.
    Oh, I didn't see this. The phones do use power control, if you're getting a nice AWS signal they'll be transmitting at very low power. Back when I had my Droid 2 Global (this was CDMA but still...) if the debug display was accurate, at edge of service it actually cheated and ran at 1 watt rather than the 250mw limit. No wonder it got so hot! If I was in town, it was running at between about -20 to -30dbm *transmit* power, that is like 1/100th to 1/1000th of a mw transmit power. Maybe it'd get up to a full 0dbm (1mw) once in a while. If you were at the edge of service, maybe the phones would crank their power and cause a problem; but if you were at edge of service it'd already be kicking the phones down to band 13 or 5 or 12 or 71.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lake Michigan View Post
    I remember when I first got a cordless phone (between the phone and the base station) in an apartment building 25 years ago. During a call you would sometimes have to hit the channel button a few times to switch channels to a clear one!

    Is there a good list somewhere that shows the actual frequencies in the AWS 1700/2100 4/66 band in use by the different carriers?

    (I haven't actually observed any interference; just curious how it all works!)
    Your best bet is to use the FCC license information for a particular city. You can see which frequency in a particular band each company owns. That will give you the clearest picture of how it works.

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