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Thread: First mentions of nationwide 5G

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I wonder how Verizon will classify C-Band in their data plan terms & conditions. They could score so much C-band spectrum that it would be feasible to allow totally unlimited access to it like with mmWave, but it would be more at risk of congestion if everyone used it as home internet. However it wouldn’t make much sense to classify it the same as other sub-7 spectrum because it has considerably more capacity. Hmm
    I think a 3rd category would be too confusing. Look at how much confusion there is now with just 2. For me Nationwide means everything that is not UWB. Is C-band really "ultra wideband". Even if they got 200 MHz( doubtful ) that would be less than half the minimum they have of 28 GHz and less than 1/3 the minimum they have anywhere of 39 GHz which is 700 MHz. And what would 3450-3550 MHz be? It's unlikely for Verizon to get more than 60 MHz of that. And there isn't much difference frequency wise

    On the one hand putting c-band on UWB would make their UWB map look much better. Own the downside if you're in UWB are that can get c-band but not mmwave then you're not coming close to those 2 GHz, 3 GHz or more speeds. Also could c-band alone handle truly unlimited data like the mmwave does? Also it wouldn't be available on plans like Start which the competition could use in advertising as "see Verizon charges extra for midband 5G" T-Mobile's 2.5 GHz is available on all plans.

    So I see it being on Nationwide, Verizon then can use the speed increases it provides to boost the speed averages of Nationwide 5G as a talking point. Verizon could use the capacity increase to up data levels

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobdevnul View Post
    That's not the way DSS works. DSS is about sharing the same band between LTE and 5G. What you described is a band selection scheme. They have been doing that since more than one band started being used - something like the 1990s.
    OK so the main goal is to let 5G and LTE co-exist on the same spectrum and allow a controlled migration of subscribers to 5G as more people get 5G devices.


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  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekfranz View Post
    OK so the main goal is to let 5G and LTE co-exist on the same spectrum and allow a controlled migration of subscribers to 5G as more people get 5G devices.
    So instead of taking away spectrum from 4G and giving to 5G which is what T-Mobile is doing with bands 71 and 41 using DSS there is no need to re-farm spectrum anymore. Sure at some point when like 97% are on 5G Verizon may switch form DSS to just fully committing that spectrum for 5G but that's like 8-10 years away.

    So in my area T-Mobile has 15X15 MHz of band 71 they choose to keep only 5X5 on band 71 for 4G which is where 5% of the customers are and use 10X10 for 5G which has at best maybe 5% of the customers. So the majority of customers get a sub-par experience. Somehow they think that is better. At&t does this with their band 5 with 5G they use 5X5 for 4G and 5x5 for 5G making sure the experience sucks for both.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekfranz View Post
    OK so the main goal is to let 5G and LTE co-exist on the same spectrum and allow a controlled migration of subscribers to 5G as more people get 5G devices.
    Yes, the D in DSS stands for dynamic. That will allow one cell band or slice of it to switch between LTE and 5G moment by moment depending on what phones or devices request. The downside is that the switching process reduces the total throughput capacity of the band or slice.

    Verizon, and to a lesser degree AT&T, need this to provide nationwide 5G because they don't have any new spectrum to put 5G on for a while and their existing LTE is already fully utilized in places. T-Mobile has a bunch of nationwide greenfield spectrum that they got by buying Sprint. Greenfield meaning that Sprint owned the license, but never fully deployed it. T-Mo, so far, has decided not to use DSS and build a straight up 5G network for the future.

  5. #50
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    I think bobdevnul explained it well. DSS is for sharing one band between LTE and 5G. Load balancing is a different network feature to send users to other bands.
    Last edited by sheytoon; 10-23-2020 at 05:46 PM.
    Want to learn more about how LTE works?
    https://productioncommunity.publicmo...ls/td-p/130581

  6. #51
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    First mentions of nationwide 5G

    So if DSS only has a moderate effect on congestion and UWB is only available in Metro areas, what is Verizon’s strategy to handle the current reports of congestion? Verizon has chosen a different build-out route by not buying tons of spectrum. Anyone know what the plan is exactly?

    They put up a new tower near here (collocated with AT&T) to help with our speed and congestion issues. Maybe that’s the plan to help capacity -build twice as many towers as everyone else? Saving money on frequency and densifying may not bad a bad strategy. More towers would give them the opportunity to deploy UWB and CBRS more places.

    No complaints on my end, just wondering the different approach will be successful.


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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekfranz View Post
    So if DSS only has a moderate effect on congestion and UWB is only available in Metro areas, what is Verizon’s strategy to handle the current reports of congestion? Verizon has chosen a different build-out route by not buying tons of spectrum. Anyone know what the plan is exactly?

    They put up a new tower near here (collocated with AT&T) to help with our speed and congestion issues. Maybe that’s the plan to help capacity -build twice as many towers as everyone else? Saving money on frequency and densifying may not bad a bad strategy. More towers would give them the opportunity to deploy UWB and CBRS more places.

    No complaints on my end, just wondering the different approach will be successful.


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    which "tons" were they suppose to buy?

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    which "tons" were they suppose to buy?
    Right, the opportunity to buy 600MHz-800mhz is passed.

    So I is was just wondering what their capacity plan might be for these Semi-rural areas where there are both lots of trees and lots of people.


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  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekfranz View Post
    Right, the opportunity to buy 600MHz-800mhz is passed.

    So I is was just wondering what their capacity plan might be for these Semi-rural areas where there are both lots of trees and lots of people.


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    Other than 600 MHz which would have had minimal effect on congestion what other 700 MHz and 800 MHz was out there to be bought? And if Verizon wanted too Comcast has a ton of 600 MHz they could lease buy an Verizon could lease buy 600 MHz from other companies that have yet to have leases with T-Mobile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haas_Dave View Post
    Verizon's CEO was on Apple's iPhone event and announced their nationwide 5G network being turned on today.

    I want more details. LOL

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    The CEO was focusing more on mm wave. Which isn’t necessarily a 5G nationwide network.


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    Quote Originally Posted by macher52 View Post
    The CEO was focusing more on mm wave. Which isn’t necessarily a 5G nationwide network.


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    The fact remains the the 5G Nationwide network launched that same day. And Nationwide is the NAME of their sub-6Ghz network. Look at the spelling. Capital N indicates proper name not description.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    The fact remains the the 5G Nationwide network launched that same day. And Nationwide is the NAME of their sub-6Ghz network. Look at the spelling. Capital N indicates proper name not description.
    I’m not a techy. So are you saying that Verizon launched their 5G network or it really isn’t a 5G network?


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    Quote Originally Posted by macher52 View Post
    I’m not a techy. So are you saying that Verizon launched their 5G network or it really isn’t a 5G network?


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    Yes it's 5G. Lowband 5G is still 5G. T-Mobile's nationwide 5G uses the 600 MHz band. I'm just saying people see "5G Nationwide network" then look at a map and complain "That's not nationwide" not realizing it's called "The 5G Nationwide network" not "The 5G nationwide network"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    Yes it's 5G. Lowband 5G is still 5G. T-Mobile's nationwide 5G uses the 600 MHz band. I'm just saying people see "5G Nationwide network" then look at a map and complain "That's not nationwide" not realizing it's called "The 5G Nationwide network" not "The 5G nationwide network"
    How about AT&T?


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    Quote Originally Posted by macher52 View Post
    How about AT&T?


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    They are using band 5 like Verizon. The difference is they split it in half using 5X5 MHz for 4G and 5X5 MHz for 5G and yes the results are as bad as you think.

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