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Thread: Benefits of 5G to the average consumer

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    Benefits of 5G to the average consumer

    Been wondering all this while with all the "craze" over 5G, how does 5G benefit the average consumer?

    Will we see
    1. Better overall coverage outside
    2. Less dropped calls
    3. Better building penetration

    I think those are the things that matter to the average consumer versus running 5G speed tests all day to see how fast your download and upload speeds are. I have the One Plus 8 5G(only because my previous phone broke) and I find myself running speedtest everytime I am out(I use wifi when I am home since I get around 600 megabits that way). I have been seeing increasing speed test results when I am out. Phone says 5G and I hit a little over 200 megabit down recently. I think that is still Low Band 5G(how can I tell if its low band or mid band) because nowhere in my area is listed by T-mobile as having been upgraded to mid band yet. Sometimes the phone says 5G and I get as low as 7 megabit down.


    I currently have Verizon Fios 1 gig internet service. A day doesn't go by without me running a speed test on my laptop to see how fast things are. Wired I got close to 900 megabits down which is nice I guess.

    Before I upgraded to their 1 gig service, I had their 100/100 service and I was just fine with it.


    Do all these massive speed increases benefit the average consumer other than bragging about speed test results?

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    Quote Originally Posted by navyson View Post
    Do all these massive speed increases benefit the average consumer other than bragging about speed test results?
    No. Is just a selling point, same goes for internet commercials. They instead should focus on capacity, not speeds. But people will fall for it, 1gb speed that they will never use... maybe once a month... “download a 120 minute movie, in 4 seconds” whats the logic on that.. lol

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    The expression "Sheeple"comes to mind. Just make it look and sound wonderful and forget about the actual facts and benefits and people will buy it I still say that over 99 % really don't need the "blazing fast" connection speeds they are advertising.
    Last edited by Serial Port; 10-28-2020 at 12:32 PM.
    Just another day in paradise.....

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    The faster download speeds should give the effect of greater bandwidth. Think about it. If 100 users get 2Mbps from a tower now, then if 200 users can get 10Mbps with 5G, it will benefit everyone. Your device will max out before the supply does. Or at least at a much higher rate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by daleraver View Post
    The faster download speeds should give the effect of greater bandwidth. Think about it. If 100 users get 2Mbps from a tower now, then if 200 users can get 10Mbps with 5G, it will benefit everyone. Your device will max out before the supply does. Or at least at a much higher rate.
    You are still thinking speeds... you are dividing their top speed by so many people.
    If the capacity (MIMO or modulations) is higher but their top speed is 30mbps... 1000 people can get that; i wouldnt mind getting 3mb ... as long as is constant..

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    The main improvement I look forward to is lower latency, when tethering for vpn access or other interactive work. And fewer slowdowns during busy periods. But LTE is usually good enough now, so I'm in no hurry to upgrade.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

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    T-mobile just turned on mid band 5G(based on the list out today) and a town close to where I live. I drove in the town earlier this week and I did a speedtest and everything came back 200+ download speed. Nice having those great speeds on my phone. I thought I would be more excited based on all this "5G craze" .Oh well.

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    'To the consumer':
    - Better handsets (this would happen regardless)
    - In general 'more coverage' - this will be a long term benefit, nothing out of the box, but is primarily focused on IoT, driverless technology, etc.
    - Better speeds .. due to requirements for items such as driverless vehicles, and home internet (to replace cable/xDSL)
    - Better call quality (VoLTE was the start of this).
    AT&T... your world, throttled.

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    5G, like LTE, is not so that you, as an individual customer, can get 900 Mbps download speed. It's about delivering usable speed to thousands of customers simultaneously, while also producing new income streams from IoT applications.
    Donald Newcomb

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    Will we see
    1. Better overall coverage outside
    2. Less dropped calls
    3. Better building penetration
    In a post here JoeinPA reports (this is on VZW 5G but still), when they were closer to the site, they were getting "up to 50" on the 5G, they showed typical speed tests and it was like 28 on 5G and 75mbps on 4G, the 4G was still faster (due to not having DSS on all bands yet.) But:
    Ironically when I do the same test in the core of the building the results are almost identical between lowband 5G and LTE. I was getting 130 Mbps for both which is odd because you would think the exterior speeds would be faster than speeds in the core of the building

    The biggest perk I found has been in low signal conditions. When I only have one bar of service and I’m a little more remote the one bar of low band 5G does a good bit better than the LTE. It also seems to handle congestion better. The spot in Oakland in between Pitt campus and UPMC I could only squeak about 1-2 Mbps at times on LTE but got around 12 Mbps on lowband 5G.
    I doubt this is Verizon-specific, I won't be surprised if 5G wasn't signifcantly faster in poor signal conditions compared to 4G.. partly there may some changes to the actual RF (whatever is new in the "New Radio" part of 5GNR). Partly, as far as I know they've gone from ECC (error correction code) in 1970s-1990s at least to Viterbi codes and turbo codes used in 4G LTE, I think they've got even newer error correcting codes now being used in 5G. There was little development on this from like 1970s-late 1990s or so, then some mathematicians and computer scientists went to work on it since then... they've found ways to have the same amount of error correction overhead handle more and more bit errors, if your error correction corrects more errors you can run a higher speed on the same quality radio link (and if you are right near the site and have a really clean link they can run less error correction overhead than 4G would need to handle the last couple bit errors that pop up now and then.)

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    Reminds me of the whole 3D TV push, neat, but did not change the day to day lives of most people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRNewcomb View Post
    5G, like LTE, is not so that you, as an individual customer, can get 900 Mbps download speed. It's about delivering usable speed to thousands of customers simultaneously, while also producing new income streams from IoT applications.
    Yup. 5G (like even 4G) is being sold to the consumer as Über fast service to the end user, however, in reality, this is much more of the 'it _can_ be very fast to the end user', but with proper QoS, controls and management, nobody will really care much about speed vs. having service that doesn't buffer or cut out. Businesses need to 'grow', and handset/handheld growth is limited to how many consumers there are - which means the market is saturated. New revenue streams such as 'Home Internet' (take on cable/telco), IoT enabled devices - from vehicles to wearables to PoS terminals, streaming cams, etc.

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    To consumers nothing but higher priced service (if not now soon depending on Federal agreements in place) & higher cost of handsets & higher cost of unwanted handsets.
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    Benefits of 5G to the average consumer

    I’m personally looking forward to the benefits we might see with VoNR compared to VoLTE and what carrier/uncarrier will pioneer the technology first.


    To me one of the benefits of having the largest nationwide 5G network over lowband will be the ability to offer this new voice-over service to more people in more places quicker.

    Will new handsets be required?



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    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    Yup. 5G (like even 4G) is being sold to the consumer as Über fast service to the end user, however, in reality, this is much more of the 'it _can_ be very fast to the end user', but with proper QoS, controls and management, nobody will really care much about speed vs. having service that doesn't buffer or cut out. Businesses need to 'grow', and handset/handheld growth is limited to how many consumers there are - which means the market is saturated. New revenue streams such as 'Home Internet' (take on cable/telco), IoT enabled devices - from vehicles to wearables to PoS terminals, streaming cams, etc.
    From what I have seen from theirs and Verizon's home internet offering, it doesn't seem competitively priced vs cable/fiber offering. In Maryland, Verizon Fios(fiber) offers 200/200 for $ 39.95 (heavy competition with Comcast here).

    I know "home internet" isn't targeting big ciities but primarily rural areas. However, it still needs to be priced competitively/lower than the competition to succeed.

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