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Thread: Benefits of 5G to the average consumer

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by navyson View Post
    From what I have seen from theirs and Verizon's home internet offering, it doesn't seem competitively priced vs cable/fiber offering. In Maryland, Verizon Fios(fiber) offers 200/200 for $ 39.95 (heavy competition with Comcast here).

    I know "home internet" isn't targeting big ciities but primarily rural areas. However, it still needs to be priced competitively/lower than the competition to succeed.
    Lucky, only DSL offers those kinds of rates in Seattle, namely Century Links 3MB/256K plan.
    Nearly every other "high speed" plan, including FIOS, is $100+ here. (I lucked out and got a basic plan on Wave that is their lowest tier and I STILL pay $95 for something 1/10th of the speed as the FIOS plans or GIG speed plans here that easily range well over $150-200.)

    Also, I'd double check that $39.95 price tag. If I know Verizon and the others, that more than likely is an intro price that will go up.
    (My wave plan started at $49.95 then went up to $90 after 6 months.)

    Comcast charges my mom (on a fixed income) almost $400 a month for her high speed, TV, and phone.

    I'd gladly switch to T-Mobile home internet for $50 a month.
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmac32here View Post
    Lucky, only DSL offers those kinds of rates in Seattle, namely Century Links 3MB/256K plan.
    Nearly every other "high speed" plan, including FIOS, is $100+ here. (I lucked out and got a basic plan on Wave that is their lowest tier and I STILL pay $95 for something 1/10th of the speed as the FIOS plans or GIG speed plans here that easily range well over $150-200.)

    Also, I'd double check that $39.95 price tag. If I know Verizon and the others, that more than likely is an intro price that will go up.
    (My wave plan started at $49.95 then went up to $90 after 6 months.)

    Comcast charges my mom (on a fixed income) almost $400 a month for her high speed, TV, and phone.

    I'd gladly switch to T-Mobile home internet for $50 a month.
    Your correct. The $39.95 for 200/200 Verizon Fios is for new customers only. I am not sure after how long it goes up. I signed up with Verizon Gigabit service last year for $79.95 a month. I have a 3 year price guarantee so at least I am guarantee no price increase for 3 years.

    Verizon is in heavy competition with Comcast here in the DC metro area so both are always upping deals and promotions. Last year, I switched to Comcast from Verizon due to the price increase. Verizon wasn't willing to budge so I switched. Within 30 days, Verizon was offering new customer pricing so I switched back the following month.

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    Quote Originally Posted by navyson View Post
    Your correct. The $39.95 for 200/200 Verizon Fios is for new customers only. I am not sure after how long it goes up. I signed up with Verizon Gigabit service last year for $79.95 a month. I have a 3 year price guarantee so at least I am guarantee no price increase for 3 years.

    Verizon is in heavy competition with Comcast here in the DC metro area so both are always upping deals and promotions. Last year, I switched to Comcast from Verizon due to the price increase. Verizon wasn't willing to budge so I switched. Within 30 days, Verizon was offering new customer pricing so I switched back the following month.
    Charter is 'not bad', but there's no real competition.
    Spectrum 50/5 or 200/10 = $69.99
    Spectrum 400/20 = $94.99
    Spectrum Gig = $129.99 + $199 install fee.

    'add $5/month for WiFi' on each

    AT&T = $45/month for 12months + $10/month rental fee + taxes for upto 50Mbps, overages at 1TB, $10/50GB overage
    $55/month after
    AT&T... your world, throttled.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    Charter is 'not bad', but there's no real competition.
    Spectrum 50/5 or 200/10 = $69.99
    Spectrum 400/20 = $94.99
    Spectrum Gig = $129.99 + $199 install fee.

    'add $5/month for WiFi' on each

    AT&T = $45/month for 12months + $10/month rental fee + taxes for upto 50Mbps, overages at 1TB, $10/50GB overage
    $55/month after
    I should also note that in many areas there is no competition at all.
    Like for my mom, her choices are Centurylink or Comcast because both had lines going to her place.
    (And one keeps chopping up the other's lines.)

    As for me, unless I do fixed wireless, my ONLY choice is Wave for internet, TV, and phone.
    (The building apparently used to have Centurylink, but they gave up their "rights" to the lines they had laid here.)

    A big reason for this is simple, back in the day, the FCC actually created "new" rules that regulated where Telcos were allowed to operate. This happened around the time that the original AT&T was deemed a monopoly as cut up into smaller companies. The new rules were put into place so that Telcos could not offer overlapping service. So the country was divided into Teco "Zones," each zone only was allowed one company. This essentially created tiny monopolies in the guise of free trade and was before the internet. Cable TV was just getting started, so those companies did not fall under the same rules since they did not provide telephone service at the time. With the rise of the internet and digital voice service, this led to duopolies in many of these markets, giving customers the choice of two companies for services. (Unless one company pulls out of a zone.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by navyson View Post
    Been wondering all this while with all the "craze" over 5G, how does 5G benefit the average consumer?

    Will we see
    1. Better overall coverage outside
    2. Less dropped calls
    3. Better building penetration

    I think those are the things that matter to the average consumer versus running 5G speed tests all day to see how fast your download and upload speeds are. I have the One Plus 8 5G(only because my previous phone broke) and I find myself running speedtest everytime I am out(I use wifi when I am home since I get around 600 megabits that way). I have been seeing increasing speed test results when I am out. Phone says 5G and I hit a little over 200 megabit down recently. I think that is still Low Band 5G(how can I tell if its low band or mid band) because nowhere in my area is listed by T-mobile as having been upgraded to mid band yet. Sometimes the phone says 5G and I get as low as 7 megabit down.


    I currently have Verizon Fios 1 gig internet service. A day doesn't go by without me running a speed test on my laptop to see how fast things are. Wired I got close to 900 megabits down which is nice I guess.

    Before I upgraded to their 1 gig service, I had their 100/100 service and I was just fine with it.


    Do all these massive speed increases benefit the average consumer other than bragging about speed test results?

    Try this unofficial map. https://coverage.lart2150.com/vector/ Using this today I went a checked out some new n41 tmo just announced a few days ago. By the panel I was getting 500-600 down. Quarter mile away speeds dropped to around 250. Half a mile, went over a hill and lost n41. I’ve never tested mmw but reading about it, kinda reminds me of n41. Gotta be close to have good speeds / even connect to it.

  6. #21
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    From what I have seen from theirs and Verizon's home internet offering, it doesn't seem competitively priced vs cable/fiber offering. In Maryland, Verizon Fios(fiber) offers 200/200 for $ 39.95 (heavy competition with Comcast here).
    It's very competitive in areas where the DSL and cable providers are in a non-competitive duopoly. Here (Iowa City) the only thing under $50 (with taxes and fees) is $20 (so $30+ with taxes and fees) for 60mbps (OK) with a 60GB cap (ridiculous)... this replaces like a 3mbps plan that at least was uncapped. Centurylink and Mediacom are not competitive, they act as a duopoly, the closest thing they do to competition is having those "1 year" prices that then go way up afterwards; so someone signs up for cable, switches to DSL after a year when the rate jacks way up, then back from DSL to cable a year after that. Or they don't and pay like double what these services really should cost. The fiber provider (ImOn) just came into town but there has not been enough time for them yet to force prices down if they're going to (they don't have better prices, but MUCH higher speeds for the price, so you'd assume the other two would have to lower their prices eventually.). I'm paying like $80 a month for 40mbps down and 5 up.

    Verizon doesn't offer their home broadband here either, the wireless network is not quite congested but certainly doesn't have the room for them to provide this home broadband (especially given how many people here would sign up for it the second it was available.)

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maryland View Post
    Try this unofficial map. https://coverage.lart2150.com/vector/ Using this today I went a checked out some new n41 tmo just announced a few days ago. By the panel I was getting 500-600 down. Quarter mile away speeds dropped to around 250. Half a mile, went over a hill and lost n41. I’ve never tested mmw but reading about it, kinda reminds me of n41. Gotta be close to have good speeds / even connect to it.
    n41 range is similar to AWS range, but about 15-20% worse in my limited B41/n41 travels. It will do well in urban areas, and still usable outdoors in suburban areas. aT&t has B30 which is also similar at 2.3GHz

    Sent from my IN2017 using HoFo mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    Charter is 'not bad', but there's no real competition.
    Spectrum 50/5 or 200/10 = $69.99
    Spectrum 400/20 = $94.99
    Spectrum Gig = $129.99 + $199 install fee.

    'add $5/month for WiFi' on each

    AT&T = $45/month for 12months + $10/month rental fee + taxes for upto 50Mbps, overages at 1TB, $10/50GB overage
    $55/month after
    I got the 400/20 plan from Spectrum back when they were bundling it with TV for $89.99 a month with free Apple TV’s.

    I didn’t know the standalone 400/20 was so expensive in comparison?




    Sent from my iPhone using HoFo
    “The Internet wasn’t meant to be metered in bits and bytes, so it’s insane that wireless companies are still making you buy it this way. The rate plan is dead — it’s a fossil from a time when wireless was metered by every call or text.” John Legere 1/5/2017

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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    I got the 400/20 plan from Spectrum back when they were bundling it with TV for $89.99 a month with free Apple TV’s.

    I didn’t know the standalone 400/20 was so expensive in comparison?




    Sent from my iPhone using HoFo
    That's non promo price. in Ohio, it's $89.99 rack rate ($69.99 for a year promo just expired) for 400/20 at my place in Columbus (mine still includes a D3.1 modem - I did not take Spectrum's WiFi)

    Compared to Comcast.. I'd actually happily take Spectrum back any day (not to mention.. as an airline employee, Spectrum includes unlimited/unthrottled Boingo Hotspots.. which more than comes in handy on my phone and iPad)

    Comcast, on promo, with a cap and 2yr contract: 300Mbps $50, Unlimited Data was $25 or $30 depending if I took their modem/router combo or not.. off promo, add $20.

    I just personally prefer how Spectrum does it. The rack rates are not "that bad" and it's upfront with no caps, and includes a decent D3.1 modem.

    AT&T offered 100/20 without a cap for $45 after "equipment fee" and the website had some odd promo of $200 back in rewards cards.. which I just applied them to the account when they mailed it to me.. that's "good enough" for now, and i'll take the ~5mos of free service at the Chicago place, since I just work a lot when it's cold and am never home anyway.
    T-Mobile: Magenta Amplified (airline employee plan)
    AT$T: $50 Unlimited Elite Prepaid promo (for more “rural” areas)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maryland View Post
    Try this unofficial map. https://coverage.lart2150.com/vector/ Using this today I went a checked out some new n41 tmo just announced a few days ago. By the panel I was getting 500-600 down. Quarter mile away speeds dropped to around 250. Half a mile, went over a hill and lost n41. I’ve never tested mmw but reading about it, kinda reminds me of n41. Gotta be close to have good speeds / even connect to it.
    Thank you ! This is accurate . My home site received n41 a few weeks ago and my house is at the edge of the coverage . My speeds have tripled outside compared to LTE. I’m about 1.7 miles away from the site.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formercanuck View Post
    n41 range is similar to AWS range, but about 15-20% worse in my limited B41/n41 travels. It will do well in urban areas, and still usable outdoors in suburban areas. aT&t has B30 which is also similar at 2.3GHz

    Sent from my IN2017 using HoFo mobile app
    I pick it up outdoors almost to two miles. The speeds aren’t blistering like they are say 1/4 mile from the site . That’s to be expected though. So how far would you say you hold onto an n41 connection ?? I bet they can blast it in rural areas

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    I have only had my 12 Pro for one day.

    My experience so far is that when the iPhone is showing 5G, I can hold genuine 100 Mbps-plus speeds for much later in the day than I could with LTE-A.

    With LTE-A, I might have 115 Mbps when I start working, but as the day progressed I'd be lucky to hold 25 Mbps in the height of the day.

    Yesterday, with 5G, I was still getting 80 Mbps in the same time periods.

    Anecdotal, I know, and it's certainly nothing like the mmWave speeds being advertised by AT&T and Verizon. (You know, those rare ultra wide band arrays that nobody really has, yet.)

    So it's definitely better, it seems to me, even if it's only an incremental improvement.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    I got the 400/20 plan from Spectrum back when they were bundling it with TV for $89.99 a month with free Apple TV’s.

    I didn’t know the standalone 400/20 was so expensive in comparison?
    Sent from my iPhone using HoFo
    Once your 'promo' expires, cost will go up. Typically they're pushing TV bundling, relatively cheaply, as they typically add a lot of 'fees', such as 'Broadcast' fee of $13.50/month, then PEG fee, etc. I was on TWC's old plan $89.99 for TV/Phone/Internet in the past. It slowly creeped up to $120, then Charter bought them out, and it climbed to $160, and I cut the cord.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Checker79 View Post
    I pick it up outdoors almost to two miles. The speeds aren’t blistering like they are say 1/4 mile from the site . That’s to be expected though. So how far would you say you hold onto an n41 connection ?? I bet they can blast it in rural areas
    Rural areas in SoCal are typically out in the desert, and ... if/when deployed will travel quite a bit. Most urban/suburban SoCal areas are limited by height and deployment (~30'). Those that are rural should reach miles. Eg. +5 miles on AWS LTE for hill top sites covering rural places like San Simeon or Agua Dulce.
    If I'm comparing to AT&T B30 (site is ~1/2 mile), signal is only usable outdoors, B2/B4/B12 all pickup indoors.
    Similarly, if I used my old LG G7, and band selected B41 (colocated with T-Mobile), I'd get ~-118dBm locally, but B25 -108dBm... and its only ~2000' away.
    If I'm looking at T-Mobile service.. its similar: AWS - 108dBm indoors, PCS -104dBm indoors, and B12, -98dBm.
    Of course, I can get 80-120Mbps with that.

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    Typically they're pushing TV bundling, relatively cheaply, as they typically add a lot of 'fees'
    Oh yeah, I had a "Broadcast Basic" that was $13.95 for like 21 channels (which I get over the air now..), it went up to like $27. I was like "OK, so I'm now paying a $7.95 sports fee and my package has zero sports channels." Next lowest TV package without a bundle discount at that point was I think $69.95? (...plus taxes and fees)

    Cancelled and switched to an antenna (Indoors, but reception here is poor here so it's a ~ 2 foot by 3 foot or so Grey Hovermann antenna with an amp). MythTV DVR hooked up to a pair of USB TV tuners (.. and an analog TV capture card I don't use any more). When digital broadcast TV came out, I was like "Well, Seinfeld's not going to be any funnier in high def"... but getting like 40 channels out of 6-7 physical channels is real nice, plenty of stuff to DVR.

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