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Thread: Verizon sells some 5G spectrum to GeoLinks

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    Verizon sells some 5G spectrum to GeoLinks

    Verizon sold a wide swath of millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum licenses to fixed wireless Internet provider GeoLinks. GeoLinks said the licenses cover top markets including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas-Ft. Worth, Atlanta, Houston, Washington DC, Boston, Tampa-St. Pete, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Detroit, Miami-Ft. Lauderdale, Charlotte, St. Louis, Raleigh-Durham and Indianapolis, among others.

    GeoLinks said the transaction will make it "the largest holder of LMDS licenses in the 29/31GHz bands." GeoLinks declined to disclose the financial terms of the agreement.

    "We sold certain spectrum licenses we've acquired through multiple larger transactions over the past few years that are not suitable for 5G mobility deployment under FCC rules. (FCC rules require this spectrum to be used for point to point solutions.)," a Verizon representative wrote in response to questions from Light Reading.

    That's noteworthy considering Verizon just spent more than $50 billion on midband C-band spectrum licenses, spectrum that can support much broader geographic areas than mmWave spectrum with fewer transmission sites.

    https://www.lightreading.com/5g/veri...d/d-id/768346?


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    Quote Originally Posted by @TheRealDanny View Post
    licenses in the 29/31GHz bands
    There it is. 5G NR band n257 spans 26.5 to 29.5 GHz, with no current 5G band extending to 31 GHz.

    “But Vivian, band n257 is LMDS and the press release says it’s LMDS spectrum!” Peep the Wikipedia article on this:

    In the United States, frequencies from 31.0 through 31.3 GHz are also considered LMDS frequencies.
    So as far as I can tell, if Verizon did have to dip into any of its active mmWave frequencies, it would have only had to take some off the top of its n257 frequencies. Even if it gave up a full 500 MHz (29.0 to 29.5 GHz), they have both C-Band (140 to 200 MHz) and 6 GHz 5G NR-U (1,200 MHz!!) coming up to make up for it, as well as their 39 GHz holdings (which aren’t active on most mmWave sites yet, as far as I know). I think they also have other mmWave holdings beyond the 28 and 39 GHz bands, and maybe they’ll even tie in 60 GHz via Wi-Fi aggregation standard (LWA/LTE-Wi-Fi Aggregation, or an as-yet-debuted “NWA” [NR-Wi-Fi Aggregation?]). 60 GHz Wi-Fi has gotten much better thanks to 802.11ay, which provides speeds up to a theoretical maximum of 100 Gbps and would therefore be extremely useful for small cells that have frequent line-of-sight to heavy data users.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    There it is. 5G NR band n257 spans 26.5 to 29.5 GHz, with no current 5G band extending to 31 GHz.

    “But Vivian, band n257 is LMDS and the press release says it’s LMDS spectrum!” Peep the Wikipedia article on this:



    So as far as I can tell, if Verizon did have to dip into any of its active mmWave frequencies, it would have only had to take some off the top of its n257 frequencies. Even if it gave up a full 500 MHz (29.0 to 29.5 GHz), they have both C-Band (140 to 200 MHz) and 6 GHz 5G NR-U (1,200 MHz!!) coming up to make up for it, as well as their 39 GHz holdings (which aren’t active on most mmWave sites yet, as far as I know). I think they also have other mmWave holdings beyond the 28 and 39 GHz bands, and maybe they’ll even tie in 60 GHz via Wi-Fi aggregation standard (LWA/LTE-Wi-Fi Aggregation, or an as-yet-debuted “NWA” [NR-Wi-Fi Aggregation?]). 60 GHz Wi-Fi has gotten much better thanks to 802.11ay, which provides speeds up to a theoretical maximum of 100 Gbps and would therefore be extremely useful for small cells that have frequent line-of-sight to heavy data users.
    Verizon didn’t sell any of its existing 28/39 GHz holdings. These were leftover licenses in the LMDS B block 150 MHz that they never intended to use. It was additional licenses they picked up with the Acquisition of straight path.

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