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Thread: AT&T wants the FCC to review and potentially limit 5G spectrum Tmobile can acquire

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by blkballoon925 View Post
    I agree with everything you just said, except this. Looking at markets like Phoenix and Cleveland, Verizon ended up with way too much low-band and contiguous mid-band, to the extent that there are no other practical options for consumers in those markets.
    In many market Verion has 20X20 many market like east coast of Florida and most of Texas at&t has 20X20. You think 2 smart companies would figure out having NATIONAL coverage in spectrum where possible is best and would come together on their own and do some simple swaps. Now some area that isn't going to work because US Cellular has one of the 2 blocks. So someone will be shorthanded( like Verizon in Milwaukee ) until US Cellular does the right thing and goes away

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Millimeter wave absolutely is useful in rural areas. It can be used to backhaul cell sites, provide FWA from tall cell towers that have line-of-sight to nearby roofs, and best of all: To provide service to automated farms. Think about how much bandwidth would be consumed by enough drones to do almost all farm work automatically, with many of them live streaming video to let human workers keep tabs on their progress; and since all of it is done outdoors without any trees in the way, it’s basically the perfect use case for mmW.

    As for midband, I’ve been seeing midband live in rural areas since the early 2010s thanks to its having good enough range to offload a good deal of traffic from the lower bands. Verizon in particular has had Band 4 (now 66) deployed on almost every cell site for years.
    I am definitely open to these possibilities, but show us ONE place in the country where AT&T, Verizon, or T-Mobile is using millimeter-wave spectrum to provide service in a rural or small-town place. Just ONE. I'm not talking mid-band, I'm talking ultra-high-frequency millimeter wave like is used in a few major metropolitan areas where the range is at most one block, only usable outdoors with not so much as a leaf or droplet of fog or rain between your phone and the transmitter. I'm talking about out in the country, a rural site with no housing development surrounding it, or a small town with a population of 500 or less with a site serving it located half a mile outside that town. Just ONE.

    I will answer my own request: there aren't any. I do not believe any carrier has built a millimeter-wave site anywhere in the US in a rural area to this date. There are precious few of them even in major urban areas.

    T-Mobile is installing Band 41 in some of their rural sites, but it has very little range according to their coverage maps. Just a mile or two. It would be useless where I live because the T-Mobile site that serves our small town is located 6 miles away, well beyond the reach of Band 41. If AT&T installed mid-band it might be useful here since their site serving the community is located just a couple hundred yards from town. But they have not done that. It really doesn't matter much since their regular LTE is giving 150 Mbps, plenty for most purposes, but it leaves the community out of the 5G "revolution".

    I just completely question millimeter-wave's utility in any sort of rural situation. You are correct in that agricultural demand and utility for 5G is potentially huge, but no carrier is doing anything in that realm at all right now, and show no signs of anything in the near future. It's all just hype at the present time.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwdewey View Post
    I am definitely open to these possibilities, but show us ONE place in the country where AT&T, Verizon, or T-Mobile is using millimeter-wave spectrum to provide service in a rural or small-town place. Just ONE. I'm not talking mid-band, I'm talking ultra-high-frequency millimeter wave like is used in a few major metropolitan areas where the range is at most one block, only usable outdoors with not so much as a leaf or droplet of fog or rain between your phone and the transmitter. I'm talking about out in the country, a rural site with no housing development surrounding it, or a small town with a population of 500 or less with a site serving it located half a mile outside that town. Just ONE.

    I will answer my own request: there aren't any. I do not believe any carrier has built a millimeter-wave site anywhere in the US in a rural area to this date. There are precious few of them even in major urban areas.

    T-Mobile is installing Band 41 in some of their rural sites, but it has very little range according to their coverage maps. Just a mile or two. It would be useless where I live because the T-Mobile site that serves our small town is located 6 miles away, well beyond the reach of Band 41. If AT&T installed mid-band it might be useful here since their site serving the community is located just a couple hundred yards from town. But they have not done that. It really doesn't matter much since their regular LTE is giving 150 Mbps, plenty for most purposes, but it leaves the community out of the 5G "revolution".

    I just completely question millimeter-wave's utility in any sort of rural situation. You are correct in that agricultural demand and utility for 5G is potentially huge, but no carrier is doing anything in that realm at all right now, and show no signs of anything in the near future. It's all just hype at the present time.
    US cellular has been actively testing it. They are getting about 5 miles of usable range on a macro site and a fixed wireless receiver in a flat rural area.

    "UScellular, Qualcomm, Ericsson, and Inseego Address Digital Divide with Multi-Gigabit Extended-Range 5G Milestone Over mmWave | UScellular" https://www.uscellular.com/get-to-kn...ne-over-mmWave

    Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joeybutts View Post
    US cellular has been actively testing it. They are getting about 5 miles of usable range on a macro site and a fixed wireless receiver in a flat rural area.

    "UScellular, Qualcomm, Ericsson, and Inseego Address Digital Divide with Multi-Gigabit Extended-Range 5G Milestone Over mmWave | UScellular" https://www.uscellular.com/get-to-kn...ne-over-mmWave

    Sent from my SM-N986U using Tapatalk
    Very interesting, thanks for letting us know about this. It sounds like it is a good proof of concept test of mmwave capabiity in clear-air, and over flat terrain, but no mention as to if there has to be an absolutely clear line of sight to the transmitter at the full 7 km, which concerns me. If there is a tree in the back yard of a rural home that blocks line of sight, is the signal going to be unusable? It does mention 750 Mbps at 1 mile without direct line of sight, but that's a pretty big degradation at short distance. Now we just have to see if US Cellular or any other carrier actually installs it anywhere in their systems. Unfortunately, no carrier is talking about doing this at the present time, only mentioning Band 41 in the case of T-Mobile or C-Band in the case of AT&T and Verizon.

    Unfortunately I would never be able to check it out here, as US Cellular only offers service in less than half of the state, which does not include nearly all the western half of the state, plus they only have three 5G-enabled sites in the small part of the western half of the state that they do service. But that's a whole other discussion about spectrum-squatting that US Cellular has been doing for years all across the country.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    In many market Verion has 20X20 many market like east coast of Florida and most of Texas at&t has 20X20. You think 2 smart companies would figure out having NATIONAL coverage in spectrum where possible is best and would come together on their own and do some simple swaps. Now some area that isn't going to work because US Cellular has one of the 2 blocks. So someone will be shorthanded( like Verizon in Milwaukee ) until US Cellular does the right thing and goes away
    vz and tm recently asked to swap some spectrum https://www.lightreading.com/5g/t-mo.../d/d-id/771617

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