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Thread: Verizon customers to see speed and performance benefits from 200 MHz C-band spectrum

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    Verizon customers to see speed and performance benefits from 200 MHz C-band spectrum

    So does this 200MHz include the 100MHz they were deploying already or is this 200MHz an addition to the 100MHz? To me it sounds like they're adding 200MHz to the 100MHz they were deploying already if I'm reading it correctly

    https://www.vanillaplus.com/2022/09/...nd-spectrum/it

    New York, United States Ė Verizon has completed lab trials using 200 MHz of C-band spectrum to provide remarkable 5G speeds and performance. Just last month, Verizon announced it was beginning to deploy 5G over 100 MHz of the spectrum Ė a significant increase from the 60 MHz of spectrum it has deployed in 5G markets to date. This next move will more than triple the spectrum available for 5G Ultra Wideband in many markets.

    ďImagine adding several more lanes to a highway,Ē says Adam Koeppe, senior vice president of technology and planning at Verizon. ďThe more lanes, the more cars can get on and off the interstate and the faster they can drive. In the same way, the more spectrum we open up on our network, the more data can move across our network faster and more efficiently.Ē

    Increasing the amount of C-band spectrum being used turbo charges Verizonís 5G service, offering significantly higher speeds, much greater capacity to accommodate more customers and more robust services, and allows Verizon to offer 5G home broadband and business internet services to more customers.

    Verizon won C-Band licenses for between 140-200 MHz in all available markets, and began in the first 46 areas deploying up to 60 MHz. Over the next few years as additional spectrum is cleared by satellite companies, Verizon will be able to deploy 5G Ultra Wideband on all available bandwidth that it has licensed, up to 200 MHz. Every piece of equipment being deployed today is capable of the full 200MHz of bandwidth.

    With the recent acquisition of C-band spectrum, Verizon now provides the industry with the strongest spectrum portfolio across low, mid and high band spectrum. Verizon holds a total of 2,035 MHz of spectrum Ė 294 MHz in Sub 6 GHz spectrum (low and mid band) and 1,741 MHz of mmWave spectrum (high band).

    Low band: Verizonís low band spectrum (nationwide 700 MHz licenses and 850 MHz spectrum) continues to provide the best 4G LTE experience in the industry and now also supports nationwide 5G service, giving customers in over 2,700 markets access to 5G. Low band signals travel great distances and penetrate through walls and dense foliage very effectively.

    High band: Verizonís mmWave build is a critical differentiator and the company continues to expand its mmWave footprint to deliver game changing experiences for the densest parts of the network. mmWave brings the benefits of exceptionally accurate signal waves leading to greater efficiency and less interference for customers, and also boasts huge capacity. mmWave service is ideal to deliver 5G service in high-usage areas like cities, venues, and stadiums for years to come.

    Mid-band: Verizonís mid-band spectrum assets include AWS, PCS, CBRS and C-band spectrum. C-band provides a valuable middle ground between capacity and coverage for 5G networks, and is enabling greater speeds than 5G on low band spectrum and greater coverage than mmWave spectrum for both mobility and home broadband solutions. The addition of C-band spectrum paves the way for Verizon to provide its differentiated service of 5G ultra wideband service to 250 million customers.

    Verizonís strong spectrum position is a result of multi-year strategic planning and investment. Having access to the strongest spectrum portfolio in the market is only half the battle, though. For many years, Verizon has been innovative and creative in its network build to use the spectrum in its portfolio in the most efficient way possible, providing the best experience for customers while carefully controlling deployment and operational costs and maximising advanced technologies to squeeze every possible speed and capacity benefit from its spectrum resources.

    ďSpectral efficiency is critical as we scale our network and define new, automated, customised ways for customers to use our networkĒ says Koeppe. ďWe have a long history of efficiently using the assets we have and we intend to continue to flex our engineering muscle as strong stewards of spectrum licenses. Using technologies like carrier aggregation, maximising the build for long term access to spectrum and planning ahead for future spectrum needs has allowed us to engage a highly disciplined approach to efficiently and rapidly make these spectrum resources available to our customers.Ē


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    They can't deploy more C-Band than they own, and they only own up to 200 MHz in any given market.

    Incremental midband capacity additions currently come from CBRS LTE, and soon CBRS 5G, but of course CBRS has worse range than C-Band both due to lower power limits and due to Verizon using 4x4 MIMO for CBRS but 64x64 MIMO for C-Band.

    Verizon plans to continue deploying mmWave to handle the areas with the highest demand, as well as to provide fixed wireless Internet access to homes and businesses.

    Their end goal is C-Band providing nearly ubiquitous coverage, mmWave providing extreme capacity in as many hotspots as possible, and CBRS providing extra capacity beyond the reach of mmWave.

    Also, CBRS will be Verizon's only upper midband 5G layer in parts of the USA outside the 48 contiguous states because C-Band was not sold outside the 48 contiguous states. Hawaii and Alaska will not get C-Band in the foreseeable future, nor will Puerto Rico, Guam, or any other territory or protectorate of the USA. Outside of the 48 contiguous states, 5G UW will only be mmWave and CBRS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shortyd999 View Post
    So does this 200MHz include the 100MHz they were deploying already or is this 200MHz an addition to the 100MHz? To me it sounds like they're adding 200MHz to the 100MHz they were deploying already if I'm reading it correctly
    They were just testing 200 MHz because that's the most they own in any given market. There is no additional c-band available ad even if there were it would have to be auctioned. They also own some licensed CBRS in larger markets so they could have a total of 200 MHz combined in those areas also

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    ...................Incremental midband capacity additions currently come from CBRS LTE, and soon CBRS 5G, but of course CBRS has worse range than C-Band both due to lower power limits and due to Verizon using 4x4 MIMO for CBRS but 64x64 MIMO for C-Band.
    Speaking of range, can anyone summarize the "supposed" range of each of the technologies?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    They were just testing 200 MHz because that's the most they own in any given market. There is no additional c-band available ad even if there were it would have to be auctioned. They also own some licensed CBRS in larger markets so they could have a total of 200 MHz combined in those areas also
    Ah ok. It's 200MHz total that they have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpz1 View Post
    Speaking of range, can anyone summarize the "supposed" range of each of the technologies?
    Iíve seen anecdotes about CBRS reaching up to about a mile, and C-Band reaching several miles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I’ve seen anecdotes about CBRS reaching up to about a mile, and C-Band reaching several miles.
    Exactly. So Verizon's statement in the OPs summary "Using technologies like carrier aggregation, maximizing the build for long term access to spectrum and planning ahead for future spectrum needs has allowed us to engage a highly disciplined approach to efficiently and rapidly make these spectrum resources available to our customers.” Should say select customers.

    There are many areas inside of the 48 contiguous states that will never see 5G other then NW for a long long long long time if ever unless they rapidly maximize the build with allot more towers.

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    Verizon customers to see speed and performance benefits from 200 MHz C-band spectrum

    Iíve said it before, and Iíll say it again. As much as everyone on cell phone forums want to think otherwise, the purpose of deploying wideband 5G cell sites isnít so a handful of subscribers can get gigabit speeds. Itís so hundreds or thousands of subscribers can get a usable data experience.

    If youíre out in the boonies in many locations, Band 13 LTE already does this all by itself. You donít need mmWave or C-Band to cover sparsely populated rural areas. Not to say that I donít think Verizon will deploy C-Band on rural sites, I believe they will. Doubly so in areas where they can sell their home internet product.

    But they arenít going to blanket the countryside with 3.5GHz signals that only travel a mile or three at best and cover no one, any more than T-Mobile is going to do so with n41. Thatís what low-band is there for: wide coverage. The higher bands are there for covering populated areas with enough capacity to provide usable service and density will be built to match that. No more, no less.


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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    Iíve seen anecdotes about CBRS reaching up to about a mile, and C-Band reaching several miles.
    Using an isolated site of C-Band that Verizon has turned on near the city of Shawnee, Oklahoma, located in gently rolling tree-covered hills, we can get some sort of an idea as to what this spectrum is capable of, or at least what capability Verizon has built at this location. The short black line is 1 mile and the long black line is 6 miles, stretching across the most dense area of coverage, and I am being a bit generous, especially on the western side of the site. This site is located in a totally rural area, giving the area of best coverage about a 6-mile diameter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVivian View Post
    I’ve seen anecdotes about CBRS reaching up to about a mile, and C-Band reaching several miles.
    Here's hoping teh FCC has hear the calls for power increases on CBRS and will obliged. Also C-band will depend on equipment. due to supply constraints Verizon is not deploying massive MIMO on all c-band equipment. So some c-band will not be equal to others

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    Quote Originally Posted by clonehappy View Post
    Iíve said it before, and Iíll say it again. As much as everyone on cell phone forums want to think otherwise, the purpose of deploying wideband 5G cell sites isnít so a handful of subscribers can get gigabit speeds. Itís so hundreds or thousands of subscribers can get a usable data experience.

    If youíre out in the boonies in many locations, Band 13 LTE already does this all by itself. You donít need mmWave or C-Band to cover sparsely populated rural areas. Not to say that I donít think Verizon will deploy C-Band on rural sites, I believe they will. Doubly so in areas where they can sell their home internet product.

    But they arenít going to blanket the countryside with 3.5GHz signals that only travel a mile or three at best and cover no one, any more than T-Mobile is going to do so with n41. Thatís what low-band is there for: wide coverage. The higher bands are there for covering populated areas with enough capacity to provide usable service and density will be built to match that. No more, no less.


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    Verizon is already deploying C-Band on rural sites in the PEA's where they are allowed to do so right now. Both rural sites and sites in some very small-sized towns that those on cellphone forums are very fond of saying don't deserve to have service at all, let alone LTE or 5G of any sort. Verizon, as well as AT&T and T-Mobile, proves those nay-sayers wrong every day.

    Verizon has been very particular about using the spectrum they own, using it everywhere it is available to be used, either by themselves or by partners they farm the spectrum out to. They don't just buy it and then sit on it, which is a great attribute of the company. I would expect them to treat CBRS and C-Band no differently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by clonehappy View Post
    I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. As much as everyone on cell phone forums want to think otherwise, the purpose of deploying wideband 5G cell sites isn’t so a handful of subscribers can get gigabit speeds. It’s so hundreds or thousands of subscribers can get a usable data experience.

    If you’re out in the boonies in many locations, Band 13 LTE already does this all by itself. You don’t need mmWave or C-Band to cover sparsely populated rural areas.
    This is BS. As someone who lives in a rural area band 13 is NOT enough. And it certainly won't be enough as Verizon is trying to push out it's fixed wireless service. If Verizon wants to leave rural areas behind the other will pick up the slack. Hell t-mobile just deployed 2.5 GHz in the 2nd largest town in my county which consists of less than 800 people people. And in a town in teh next country to the west of me they also deployed 2.5 GHz and it's slightly larger. But please keep hoping Verizon only deploys band 13 here. By teh way Verizon has b 2,5, 13, and 66 with a total of 45 MHz on downlink on at any one time and even in the day you can still get slowdowns on Start. So please keep telling me that 10 MHz of band 13 is enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwdewey View Post
    Verizon has been very particular about using the spectrum they own, using it everywhere it is available to be used, either by themselves or by partners they farm the spectrum out to. They don't just buy it and then sit on it, which is a great attribute of the company. I would expect them to treat CBRS and C-Band no differently.
    Exactly Verizon doesn't own 850 MHz of 28 GHz( which was sold by COUNTY ) and 1300 MHz of 39 GHz for s--ts and giggles. They didn't buy 160 MHz of c-band here just because. People that think rural area can use mid band and mmwave just don't think big picture or outside the box. They think "Verizon, consumer mobile phone service only company" and that's very narrow view of this company

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Hagar View Post
    This is BS. As someone who lives in a rural area band 13 is NOT enough. And it certainly won't be enough as Verizon is trying to push out it's fixed wireless service. If Verizon wants to leave rural areas behind the other will pick up the slack. Hell t-mobile just deployed 2.5 GHz in the 2nd largest town in my county which consists of less than 800 people people. And in a town in teh next country to the west of me they also deployed 2.5 GHz and it's slightly larger. But please keep hoping Verizon only deploys band 13 here. By teh way Verizon has b 2,5, 13, and 66 with a total of 45 MHz on downlink on at any one time and even in the day you can still get slowdowns on Start. So please keep telling me that 10 MHz of band 13 is enough.
    I donít know anything about your location or the network performance there.

    In many rural areas, the existing LTE spectrum is sufficient. I didnít say I hope Verizon only deploys Band 13 anywhere, nor did I say I didnít think they would deploy C-Band. I said the opposite, but please let your blind rage put words in my mouth.

    On the flip side, itís well known from my posts here that I personally live in an area, not rural, where due to NIMBY, foliage and other factors the only coverage layer I can use is low band. While this isnít ideal for me, I donít expect Verizon to go out of their way to add cell sites just for one small subdivision. I am just not that entitled, and I expect a company to make decisions based on what makes sense as a balance between best coverage, fastest speeds, and cost factors.


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    Quote Originally Posted by clonehappy View Post
    I donít know anything about your location or the network performance there.
    Yet you like to talk like you do.

    In many rural areas, the existing LTE spectrum is sufficient. [/bquote]

    BS and if you don't get that by now please go learn about stuff

    [bquote]On the flip side, itís well known from my posts here that I personally live in an area, not rural, where due to NIMBY, foliage and other factors the only coverage layer I can use is low band. While this isnít ideal for me, I donít expect Verizon to go out of their way to add cell sites just for one small subdivision. I am just not that entitled, and I expect a company to make decisions based on what makes sense as a balance between best coverage, fastest speeds, and cost factors.
    So you admit you're are is not rural yet you think you can speak of what is needed there. The rest of what you posted is irrelevant. How do you live in a NOT rural area but live so far from a tower you can only use lowband?

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