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Thread: Home Internet Choices For Seasonal Users

  1. #16
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    Home Internet Choices For Seasonal Users

    Well, this is interesting. It shows this in stock at Bullhead City AZ Wall-To-Wall Mart.

    Would they carry it in store is the service if not available in that area?

    I am sure that there is Verizon service there. So, from what I have read, it is not restricted where you use it. I need to look into this a bit more.

    Thank you for all of the replies, so far, too!


    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Straight-...9?athbdg=L1100
    Last edited by Jim1348; 10-19-2022 at 09:56 PM.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim1348 View Post
    Would they carry it in store is the service is not available in that area?
    Yes. They sell uw5G phones where uw5G isn't available.

    The ad says to first "Check eligibility on our (Straight Talk) website and confirm coverage for your area".

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    I'd be concerned that visible caps their hotspot speed at 5Mbps. That might not be fast enough for home internet use.
    It's (Visible) is good enough for my laptop but won't run my Roku. When my laptop is not connected per their TOS.
    I will be Judged on how I helped the poor, sick & others in need; strangers & loved ones alike.

    My plans:
    Visible (Verizon) UTT & Unlimited Data $25/mo
    T-Mobile Gold Rewards $10yr exp 12.25.23

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet1000 View Post
    I'd be concerned that visible caps their hotspot speed at 5Mbps. That might not be fast enough for home internet use.
    I agree about the hotspot speed.
    My roommate and I did the Visible trial on her iPhone eSIM. The max we got was 2Mbps speeds on connected devices. It wasn't difficult to bypass Visible's 1-device-only hotspot restriction, but the speeds were terrible.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpz1 View Post
    Mobile hot spots are different. With the Fixed Wireless Home Internet being touted it can only be used at the address you give where it's available.
    You can't order it using the address in an area that allows it, then use it at another location unless the tower it pings off is the same.
    It’s been working for 3 months now. I keep waiting for the hammer to fall since it’s all roaming data.

  6. #21
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    Wow! Just Wow! I had no idea Straight Talk had home internet. The device is $100 to own outright and service is $45. Combine that with Home Phone and you have a Xfinity killer.

    I think I may pony up the money to spend and get it. I can get the service in my area.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleBear916 View Post
    Wow! Just Wow! I had no idea Straight Talk had home internet. The device is $100 to own outright and service is $45. Combine that with Home Phone and you have a Xfinity killer.

    I think I may pony up the money to spend and get it. I can get the service in my area.
    If it's eligible in your area with the address you check, could you share the general area ? Thanks

  8. #23
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    You might want to check this on T-Mobile's site: https://www.t-mobile.com/home-intern...SWWEWELXE86564

    I had unlimited data but had to cancel that plan. I want to sign up again, but the T-Mobile store says I cannot get unlimited data anymore. What is up with that?
    Fixed wireless broadband works differently from wired services. We allocate access on a first-come first-served basis in each area based on network capacity, which is increasing all the time. Availability can and will change in local areas as more customers in that area sign up. Customers who are interested in T-Mobile Home Internet but aren’t eligible for our unlimited Home Internet service can sign up for Home Internet Lite. Once Home Internet Lite customers become eligible for our unlimited service, they can upgrade their service at no extra cost.

    I copied and pasted the question and answer from one of the questions & answer from the site I gave at the start of the post. I am in the midst of really checking out wireless home internet for year round use though.

  9. #24
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    Sorry for the late reply. My area is the East Bay Area, Hayward, California.

  10. #25
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    Just in case anyone's thinking of going in for the Straight Talk home internet plan --
    over on the Straight Talk forum, it's reported that Verizon has closed a loophole by updating their ToS:
    https://www.howardforums.com/showthr...6#post17232306

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleBear916 View Post
    Sorry for the late reply. My area is the East Bay Area, Hayward, California.
    Ok thanks, that explains why you can get it in your area. That's a Verizon UltraWide 5G area.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sillyette View Post
    Just in case anyone's thinking of going in for the Straight Talk home internet plan --
    over on the Straight Talk forum, it's reported that Verizon has closed a loophole by updating their ToS:
    https://www.howardforums.com/showthr...6#post17232306
    I don't know that they closed a loophole as much as no one previously caught it or Verizon forgot (wink wink) to include it in any recent T&C updates. Like I mentioned before their wireless Home Internet is over a year old and originally was LTE only before 5G started to crank up and it was clearly in the T&Cs then.
    Even when it was LTE only hardly anyone could get it because of the LTE capacity restraints in many areas. Now there are still many areas with even worse LTE capacity because they're dumping everything into metro uw5G and not much attention to LTE or even so called NationWide 5G (DSS) which itself just shares the LTE frequencies.

  13. #28
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    I'm wondering if they're (Verizon and Straight Talk for that matter) quietly only allowing this service in 5G areas, despite marketing it as an LTE and 5G service.

    I live in an extremely rural area without a lot of broadband options. I had been routinely checking addresses of family members and others to see if they could get the Verizon Home LTE Internet service and most could (none of the addresses ever qualified for 5G Home Internet... "but you can get LTE Home Internet at this address!" was always the message). But right after this Straight Talk option was released, none of the addresses qualify any more.

    It's entirely possible that the towers that serve the area have reached capacity. But just odd that the service became unavailable right when this Straight Talk option was released.

    Perhaps Verizon updated their tower capacity database just prior to releasing the Straight Talk option and now all of the towers in the area are declared to be at capacity. But I also know there is no 5G in this area. And it seems a lot of the reviews I'm hearing about the Straight Talk service are on 5G.

    If this is being geared more towards 5G, then I'm not sure if Verizon or Straight Talk is missing their market. If you live in an area with fiber or coaxial cable, then that option would be superior to any cellular based Internet service. And for the most part, 5G is only available in those same areas. But for areas where the only other option is geosynchronous satellite service - where Starlink isn't even available - even if it's just LTE service that Verizon/Straight Talk can offer - those would be areas where this service could really take off.

    I do have a family member on the LTE Home Internet service from Verizon, signed up before the address became unavailable. She had HughesNet before. And she just brags about how great this service is compared to what she had. She really didn't know how bad HughesNet was until she got this service. But her neighbors no longer qualify to get this service.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlesfinley View Post
    I'm wondering if they're (Verizon and Straight Talk for that matter) quietly only allowing this service in 5G areas, despite marketing it as an LTE and 5G service.

    I live in an extremely rural area without a lot of broadband options. I had been routinely checking addresses of family members and others to see if they could get the Verizon Home LTE Internet service and most could (none of the addresses ever qualified for 5G Home Internet... "but you can get LTE Home Internet at this address!" was always the message). But right after this Straight Talk option was released, none of the addresses qualify any more.

    It's entirely possible that the towers that serve the area have reached capacity. But just odd that the service became unavailable right when this Straight Talk option was released.

    Perhaps Verizon updated their tower capacity database just prior to releasing the Straight Talk option and now all of the towers in the area are declared to be at capacity. But I also know there is no 5G in this area. And it seems a lot of the reviews I'm hearing about the Straight Talk service are on 5G.

    If this is being geared more towards 5G, then I'm not sure if Verizon or Straight Talk is missing their market. If you live in an area with fiber or coaxial cable, then that option would be superior to any cellular based Internet service. And for the most part, 5G is only available in those same areas. But for areas where the only other option is geosynchronous satellite service - where Starlink isn't even available - even if it's just LTE service that Verizon/Straight Talk can offer - those would be areas where this service could really take off.

    I do have a family member on the LTE Home Internet service from Verizon, signed up before the address became unavailable. She had HughesNet before. And she just brags about how great this service is compared to what she had. She really didn't know how bad HughesNet was until she got this service. But her neighbors no longer qualify to get this service.
    I was harping about this issue when the LTE only version first came out. They were claiming great for rural areas like you describe. But even then I couldn't get it at my location which isn't corn fields and cows but a well populated small rural town surround by subdivisions. As Verizon and the others geared up their uw5G in heavy populated metros, suburbs and major corridors, improvements to LTE sites stopped but subscribers in these areas increased as did general data usage on phones. That killed any capacity there use to be. There's no need for Verizon to "build it and they will come" in these areas when they already have 80% of the population in areas that can use uw5G because of it's very limited range.
    Nationwide (DSS) 5G, which is shared with LTE, can't hack in either. I've read they even stopped deploying NW 5G after getting everyone thinking all 5G is the same. Sure as these areas get more populated some new tech UW5G with better range or tower infill will come. I'm old and won't give a crap by then.

  15. #30
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    Home Internet Choices For Seasonal Users

    Now that my sister-in-law is about a month away from leaving for Nevada, we/she needs to make a decision on this sooner rather than later.

    I think we can rule out T-Mobile Home Internet for Metro because of the requirement for voice lines with Metro.

    I suppose simply getting another post-paid T-Mobile Home internet device might be a good option. We/she would need to find out, first, if it is available. I assume seasonal users need to return the device fairly soon after cancelling service. Also, the cost of re-activating a line each year come to mind.

    Although the Straight Talk Home Internet Plan isn't officially available at their winter home, I gather it could be activated using a different address. Since she would own the device purchased at Wal-Mart, she avoid avoid the inconvenience of returning a piece of equipment each year. Then we could focus on how much is costs to "activate" the service each year.

    Since she has several voice lines on T-Mobile as a business customer, getting a data line and putting it in one of my Netgear hotspots may be a viable option.

    Finally. I have the AT&T tablet plan. I may simply borrow it to her for a while and get it back from her in the spring.

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