Do 212 numbers ever show up in the number pool?

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ratsintheattic

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I check all the time for the ever elusive/always in demand 212 numbers, but have yet to see any. This doesn't necessarily mean there aren't any; they could just be getting scooped up before I come upon them. Have you ever seen any on GV, or perhaps even snagged one yourself?
 
Just curious, why is that number so much in demand? Is it an area code or a local phone exchange? What exchange is this from? Not enough information provided.
 
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Highly coveted.

Original area code of a wealthy area of mid-town Manhattan.

I grew up in PLaza-5
 
I check all the time for the ever elusive/always in demand 212 numbers, but have yet to see any. This doesn't necessarily mean there aren't any; they could just be getting scooped up before I come upon them. Have you ever seen any on GV, or perhaps even snagged one yourself?

I doubt they'll ever be available for GV subscribers.

However, you can buy one for twenty bucks or so from NumberBarn:
https://www.numberbarn.com/search?state=New%20York&npa=212&sort=price%2B&saleOnly=true

If you decide to buy one, make sure to check if it is portable to GV before completing the purchase.
 
Highly coveted.

Original area code of a wealthy area of mid-town Manhattan.

I grew up in PLaza-5

I lived in ACademy2 in the sixties.

From what I remember, AC212 covered the whole City of New York until the Area Code split.

AC212 is now limited to (all) of Manhattan.

However, the value of AC212 numbers has decreased precipitously in the last few years. They use to go for around $100 for a plain vanilla number to hundreds of thousands for some repetitive numbers.

I bought a couple of plain vanilla ones last year for under $10 each.
 
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However, the value of AC212 numbers has decreased precipitously in the last few years. They use to go for around $100 for a plain vanilla number to hundreds of thousands for some repetitive numbers.

I think it's because the younger generations don't really care about area codes and such. It's older people like myself who still care about such trivial things :lol:
 
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There was a Seinfeld show on this issue. Elaine had to get a new number which didn't have a 212 area code. When her new boyfriend found out what her number was he dumped her. Having a 212 area code indicates [to some people] you are a native New Yorker.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1H3U7AeQic
 
there was once a time saving benefit to calling area code 212

it was the fastest possible 3 number combination to dial on a rotary dial phone

1 and 0 were reserved for only the center digit of area codes.
 
Once upon a time I worked for an authorized reseller and one of the carriers at the store was t-mobile. I started seeing 212 numbers being given and decided to try and switch my number to 212. T-mobile was able to accommodate… not sure what their policies are now but it’s worth a shot seeing if they have or your current carrier has… Long story short I still have my 212 number but it’s on google voice now ;)


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there was once a time saving benefit to calling area code 212

it was the fastest possible 3 number combination to dial on a rotary dial phone

1 and 0 were reserved for only the center digit of area codes.
Good find, but I don't think that's still 100% accurate.

According to the following Wikipedia article, there are now Area Codes 600, 700, 800 and, as we all know, 900:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_North_American_Numbering_Plan_area_codes

However, there still don's seem to be any ACs ending two ones (*11).
 
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Not a "policy"

Just availability from the pool of numbers they "own"

changes over time, they come and go
 
Good find, but I don't think that's still 100% accurate.

According to the following Wikipedia article, there are now Area Codes 600, 700, 800 and, as we all know, 900:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_North_American_Numbering_Plan_area_codes

However, there still don's seem to be any ACs ending two ones (*11).

area code can be pretty much anything now, but places that do not require 10 digits for all calls cannot use any area codes for the prefix(first 3 of the 7 digits after the area code)
 
there was once a time saving benefit to calling area code 212

it was the fastest possible 3 number combination to dial on a rotary dial phone

1 and 0 were reserved for only the center digit of area codes.

Greetings fellow old person! I remember our first push button phone had a switch to select between pulse and tone, so it would be usable whether or not your carrier supported digital dialing.
 
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Greetings fellow old person! I remember our first push button phone had a switch to select between pulse and tone, so it would be usable whether or not your carrier supported digital dialing.
I had a phone with push buttons that sent dial pulses. Used on a CO switch that did not have TT dialing.

Sent from my SM-T500 using Tapatalk
 
I had a phone with push buttons that sent dial pulses. Used on a CO switch that did not have TT dialing.

I had those up to about 2000. My phone company charged and extra dollar or two a month for Touch Tone service.

I still have them, but don't use them.
 
i believe there are places in Europe(and elsewhere) where 'pulse dialing' is still the standard for legacy landlines and touch tones were never implemented.

although overall I believe the there are few landlines(non-VOIP, dedicated cooper wire) left
 
when i lived in Europe in the 90's and early 2000's i had a handheld 'tone generator' that i would use(holding up to the handset) if i called into IVR/Phone trees back home since the phones did not support touch tones even though they were mostly push button.
 
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