how know if NEED to make app password for email mobile app?

joseg2016

Member
ToTW Winner
HoFo Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2016
Messages
872
I tried a web search and not finding anything related. I could test try with existing accounts but becasue they are still very messy, I do not want to risk the limited storage on the device.

How do we know if we must generate an app password to setup an email account to android smartphone?

I have one GMail account setup on the android smartphone and routinely use GMail in the mobile GMail app. I ALSO have installed Blue Mail mobile app on the smartphone. What I may want to accomplish is to use a computer to create a new either AOL or Yahoo or Outlook account; and then put this account information into the Blue Mail app on the mobile phone. The app itself will list choices for which service is the email account on, which seems like a very nice thing; like the Blue Mail mobile app is ready to quickly take in any of Yahoo, or AOL, or Outlook, or GMail... The app lists those for me to pick. So does this indicate that I would not need to generate an app password?

Why I would choose a new account on AOL or Outlook or Yahoo is because wanting to have an alternate email account dedicated to the mobile device and the current ones I have (email accounts) have too many message in them and am afraid of reducing mobile devices storage or other resources.

Similarly, in case I were to install the Yahoo mobile app and use computer to create new yahoo account; would I need to generate an app password? I am only guessing, not.
 
I don't understand the question. An APP usually doesn't need a password, but an email ACCOUNT does.

Regarding saving space on your phone, why are you installing other email apps? The Gmail app is preinstalled (on Android), and can't be uninstalled, so why not just use that for ALL of your email accounts to avoid using more storage with additional email apps? You can limit the number of messages stored on the device itself in the Gmail app settings.

I used to use K9 long ago, but at some point, its usefulness was no longer worth having an additional app installed, so now I use the Gmail app for 7 Gmail, 2 POP3, 2 Yahoo!, 2 Aim, and 1 Hotmail email accounts. I also used to have my old NetZero and Juno email accounts set up, but I guess I didn't add them back when I switched to my current Pixel 3a XL in 2019, so now I just have those 14 email accounts in my Gmail app.
 
I only have email with Yahoo and Gmail.

Obviously, if you use an email provider's own app for its domain-named email product, you don't have to think about any of this.

But if you like to use other email clients ("brands" of email app; third party, if you will), you may find that app does or does not have built-in capabilities to easily deal with the latest authentication methods the email service requires.

Mainly I refer to Oauth2. Both Yahoo and Gmail, and likely quite a few others, now require third-party email apps to be Oauth2 compliant.

Most of the better email apps reveal their support of Oauth2 when you go to add an account from one or more of the major email services like Yahoo or Gmail. These apps will have a branded selection list for the services they support with Oauth2, and (my understanding is) this usually means they've got an agreement to incorporate that email service's stylized brand "look" in the app's installation sequence, which means Oauth2 is going to be used and both sides are mutually compliant.

However, if the app doesn't have that capability, or the email address is using a non-standard domain name (such as, in the Yahoo email world, something like @sbcglobal.net, which one of my accounts uses) the email app won't and can't automatically configure properly. In these types of cases you'll need to establish an app password.

I've only done this for my sbcglobal/Yahoo account using either Aqua Mail or K-9 Mail. It has to be done (establishing the app password) on the Yahoo Mail website on a computer (or any device that can bring up a full desktop browser to view the full features of the email product. You just navigate to a particular area of Settings and do what needs to be done (this would likely vary among email providers), establish the special password, then use it in any third-party email app where necessary in place of whatever your original (and still applicable) password is. Just in the third-party apps, not the webmail. And on as many devices as you have whatever email app installed, for that particular email service.

I hope that helps your understanding a bit.

I'm not a fan of either the official Yahoo Mail app or the Gmail app. I can elaborate if anyone's curious.
 
Boz1, a quote what you say,

Regarding saving space on your phone, why are you installing other email apps? The Gmail app is preinstalled (on Android), and can't be uninstalled, so why not just use that for ALL of your email accounts to avoid using more storage with additional email apps? You can limit the number of messages stored on the device itself in the Gmail app settings.

I test tried one of my AOL accounts in the GMail mobile app and upon checking the results, this worked very badly. Maybe a new Yahoo account would work better, but not sure; might not try Yahoo account in the GMail app.... .
 
Boz1, this part:

I don't understand the question. An APP usually doesn't need a password, but an email ACCOUNT does.

You seem to be confirming what I asked. From the response, I do not expect that putting an AOL or Yahoo account into Blue Mail app would require any special generated app password.
 
from whacker,

Most of the better email apps reveal their support of Oauth2 when you go to add an account from one or more of the major email services like Yahoo or Gmail. These apps will have a branded selection list for the services they support with Oauth2, and (my understanding is) this usually means they've got an agreement to incorporate that email service's stylized brand "look" in the app's installation sequence, which means Oauth2 is going to be use and both sides are mutually compliant.

Seems good, also feels like confirming what I hope; that Blue Mail app will not need a generated app password for aol nor Yahoo email accounts.
 
I too don't understand the question.

To try to clarify or condense:
If I want to add a Yahoo account or a AOL account to some mobile app like Blue Mail, for email on mobile device, must an app password be generated?

It seems that the answer from both @whacker and @Boz1 is "No."
 
@whacker comments

I'm not a fan of either the official Yahoo Mail app or the Gmail app. I can elaborate if anyone's curious.

I am curious but do not know for certain what to ask right now. Did you discuss that on the forum within about the past 1 year? Maybe give some hint what to look for in a web search through a search engine?

As for just staying with the mobile GMail app; I tried one of my AOL(?) account in the app and the results were terrible. But at least GMail app works extremely well for Gmail.
 
You only need an app password if the third-party email app you're using isn't buddies with the email provider. In other words, has an agreement with that provider so they incorporate Oauth2 into their app, and the app in turn has that provider's branded logo in the selection process when you go to add a new account to the app. Blue Mail is now one of the larger players, so they do use Oauth2. There may now be few that do not, but you'd see that if adding an account to the app failed. Or if the account you're trying to add is not a standard named email provider domain name.

Further: At some point in time a few years ago (I don't know if it was Yahoo or Google or some consortium of email providers), it was determined that for users who use third-party email clients (apps), they wanted to improve the security of access to your email accounts by going beyond the app just applying your account password at the time you open up the app. So they developed Oauth2 (yes, there were earlier versions), and some years ago started to enforce the use or inclusion of it into third-party email apps. Yahoo's and Gmail's own proprietary apps have it built-in along with other features that make their apps and mail services work a certain way (like featuring instant push notifications).

For the rest of the email app industry who may have been slow to adopt the new authentication standard called Oauth2, the email providers could've said well, your email app can no longer work with our email service. No more cross-compatibility. You've got to use our app (or the web). But they figured out how to share the authentication protocols with app developers to include into their new updated apps, for the most part. There were stragglers, but also there were devices that had old email apps/clients on them that people seemed to not want to update or change from. This is where the app password comes into play. The major email providers made it possible to use their webmail interfaces to generate these app passwords that would substitute for your account password and be something that was more secure than having your email app store and apply that account password at login (the most vulnerable time for a hacker to intercept it).
 
Last edited:
As for just staying with the mobile GMail app; I tried one of my AOL(?) account in the app and the results were terrible. But at least GMail app works extremely well for Gmail.

What does "the results were terrible" mean?
 
I don't think any email app requires a unique special password just to run it. I don't know if any email app other than exchange requires a different authentication method other than imap. The vendor specific apps probably have automatic setup routines fir their own services though.

That being said, I ran into a couple of instances where the built in Gmail app did not work correctly with a 3rd party email app so I'm using 3 different email apps on my phone.

I had Yahoo Mail on Gmail and certain security emails would it get rendered correctly causing me not to be able to respond or answer correctly. But everything worked fine via Yahoo app.

My work account via Microsoft exchange using imap, for some reason could not delete emails on the Gmail app so had to load outlook client.

Dont know if any of these issues were ever fixed but once you find a solution, you tend to stick with it.

Sent from my motorola one 5G UW ace using HoFo mobile app
 
What does "the results were terrible" mean?

Let's thank @ShredFred for describing some of what I believe I found when I tried a 'third-part' email account in the GMail mobile app.

Setting up the third-party account to the Gmail app was not necessarily difficult; but trying to use the account in the Gmail app gave poor display, inability to send email mssgs., material missing in received email message; I cannot remember so clearly. This was maybe six months ago.
 
If I use the Gmail app with my Yahoo accounts it displays the message text teeny-tiny, and it can't be adjusted unless you change the font or Display size globally for the entire phone. Also, the Gmail app, in conjunction with Android's "Doze" feature, essentially puts the mail app to sleep and you won't be notified of incoming email until you bump or wake the phone. This is after some timing preset thresholds in Doze are met.

The Yahoo Mail Android app is a huge wallowing beast of an application, and has ads and is always pimping Yahoo's "Plus" paid-for service. No thanks. It fetches Yahoo Mail instantly like no other, but those tradeoffs are too great for me.
 
Is the consensus that there's no one email app that can truly handle all email addresses satisfactorily?

I guess the Gmail app can go to sleep, as whacker pointed out, but that's not an issue for those of us who ignore most notifications on their phone until they have occasion to pick it up, which is when I check email notifications. If that was happening to my Google Voice app so that I wasn't receiving calls or texts, THAT would be an issue for me, so it makes sense that the email app going to sleep could be an issue for others.

Yahoo! email in the Gmail app displays in normal size text for me, but I have my phone set to font size LARGEST, so that may be the difference. That may also explain why I need to rotate my phone to landscape for some emails, from all providers, to display without using left-right scrolling.
 
I'm not getting afair any ads on YM. I think that's because I use NetGuard downloaded from Github only. Other sites NetGuard is stripped of it's ad blocking.
 
I'm not getting afair any ads on YM. I think that's because I use NetGuard downloaded from Github only. Other sites NetGuard is stripped of it's ad blocking.

NetGuard, be something more to first try to learn about. I am now discouraged from trying the Yahoo mobile app and imagine the going would be easier if I try the use of the Blue Mail mobile app.

Truthfully, due to my never yet tried the Yahoo mobile app, I have no idea the size of the problems the app would present; large or small or in-between.
 
I've already briefly discussed probable use of Blue Mail mobile app. I am finding something interesting in the GMail mobile app.

click on sandwhich icon
scroll and find and click on Settings
forgot exactly what else, but click on Add Account

The Gmail app then presents a list of specific email providers which are:
GMail, Outlook, Yahoo, Office...365, "Other".
So whichever one will fit is to be picked.

I notice very plainly that "AOL" is not one of those listed. This seems to mean, GMail app is not very well ready to easily let us use AOL account. AOL and GMail are not "buddies".

I know what kind of new email account I should create. I know what kind of app & account test checking I should do.


-------

By this point, I am accepting ahead of time that I should have nothing to worry about any generated app password.
 
I have some @aim.com email addresses, which is AOL. They work fine for me in the Gmail app. You can set the Gmail app to check for new email every 15, 30, or 60 minutes.

By the way, I was poking around in my account settings on aol.com, and found what you're probably talking about, that I must have completely forgotten.
"App Password
1 Passwords
Last password generatedAndroid Mail
Generate and manage app passwords"
 
I do not understand the question either, but you do not need Application Specific Password for Gmail, hotmail/outlook.com, Yahoo and AOL on modern mobile email clients. They all support OAUTH2 login.

If you use some deprecated app that does not support OAUTH2, then use this manual

https://telegra.ph/IMAP-POP-and-SMT...cy-email-clients-without-OAUTH2-support-08-03

Some desktop email apps still need Application Specific Password for Yahoo/AOL (like some versions of Outlook) but not on mobile devices.

Mobile version of Gmail, Outlook, Samsung Email all support OAUTH2 and no Application Specific Password is required. Just use your main accaunt password.

How do we know if we must generate an app password to setup an email account to android smartphone?

As I said, most likely you do not need it.

So does this indicate that I would not need to generate an app password?

Correct


Similarly, in case I were to install the Yahoo mobile app and use computer to create new yahoo account; would I need to generate an app password? I am only guessing, not.

You do not need to generate Application Specific Password
 
Back
Top