Unlimited 256k slow speed data after you use up your high speed?

fstuff

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I have Mint Mobile 3month prepaid.
If i run out of LTE, it goes to unlimited 128k bps data speed. It's doable if you only open up 1 webpage at a time.

Are there any prepaid providers that offer unlimited 256k slow data?
 
H20 Priority on ATT throttles at 256

NEW ATT annual $300 Plan, throttle is 1.5Mbps

Truly unlimited at high speed (depri during congestion) is better, e.g. Visible
 
... since i use about 1/2gig per day data

No offense intended, but you're the type of customer that MVNOs really don't want on their low-allotment plans with fallback data. Selling 1GB, and providing 31 GB, isn't exactly a winning formula for an MVNO.
 
No offense intended, but you're the type of customer that MVNOs really don't want on their low-allotment plans with fallback data. Selling 1GB, and providing 31 GB, isn't exactly a winning formula for an MVNO.
Lol I think the MVNO companies will be fine. Calm down
 
Not with wholesale data rates right now. That customer would be a huge loss for them.
They craft their plans so that they make a profit overall.

It is ALWAYS the case except for PayGo, that the light users subsidise the heavy ones.

Just as the wealthier / low-information / careless users subsidise the poorer / more knowledgeable plan-hoppers, taking advantage of free trials, promos etc.

I find it very weird someone being such a bootlicker to the point of telling consumers to hold back in order to ensure the corporation's profits??
 
They craft their plans so that they make a profit overall.

It is ALWAYS the case except for PayGo, that the light users subsidise the heavy ones.

Just as the wealthier / low-information / careless users subsidise the poorer / more knowledgeable plan-hoppers, taking advantage of free trials, promos etc.

I find it very weird someone being such a bootlicker to the point of telling consumers to hold back in order to ensure the corporation's profits??

I'm not being a bootlicker at all. I'm just pointing out that the example given with a customer paying for 1GB and using 30GB more would be a massive loss.

The OP's specific post doesn't suggest that's what they're planning to do.

Also, it's funny you mention corporation as if you're suggesting these are all huge companies. Most MVNOs have less than 500K customers and there are plenty much smaller than that. I'm sure Tello axing 64Kbps on their lower plans was because of abuse cutting into their already low profits from being so competitively priced with other true MVNOs.
 
Small or large is not relevant - that is their job, design the plan parameters so they are sustainable

given the average usage per customer

You imply that we outliers that take full advantage of these parameters of their design are thus doing something wrong

but they are in full control of the thresholds they set in trying to grow their user base.

They can always as you say make adjustments to how they define "unlimited", including kicking off "abusive" customers

Ideally publishing guidelines as to what those thresholds are.

Personally I think the FCC should regulate exactly what Unlimited has to mean

and then the vendors would need to be more explicit in describing their offerings, helping to educate consumers in the market's realities rather than treating them like mushrooms
 
Small or large is not relevant - that is their job, design the plan parameters so they are sustainable

given the average usage per customer

You imply that we outliers that take full advantage of these parameters of their design are thus doing something wrong

but they are in full control of the thresholds they set in trying to grow their user base.

They can always as you say make adjustments to how they define "unlimited", including kicking off "abusive" customers

Ideally publishing guidelines as to what those thresholds are.

Personally I think the FCC should regulate exactly what Unlimited has to mean

and then the vendors would need to be more explicit in describing their offerings, helping to educate consumers in the market's realities rather than treating them like mushrooms

To be fair, I don't completely disagree with you, but carriers don't always expect the kind of usage that they end up getting. I'll never forget when US Mobile went totally unlimited and axed it within a month and I'm sure the CEO won't forget either. He couldn't believe how much data customers were using nor how quickly they used it. It was in the petabytes lol.

An unintended consequence of the FCC regulating what unlimited has to mean would be the end of any plans that allow usage beyond the data included so I don't think people would appreciate that much when they're paying the same or more money but no longer have the throttled speeds to fall back on.
 
i don't know if MVNO's pay the same price per KB for throttled data as they do for full speed

if they do I am sure allowing very large amount of data at any speed for a low price would be cost prohibited
 
To be fair, I don't completely disagree with you, but carriers don't always expect the kind of usage that they end up getting. I'll never forget when US Mobile went totally unlimited and axed it within a month and I'm sure the CEO won't forget either. He couldn't believe how much data customers were using nor how quickly they used it. It was in the petabytes lol.

An unintended consequence of the FCC regulating what unlimited has to mean would be the end of any plans that allow usage beyond the data included so I don't think people would appreciate that much when they're paying the same or more money but no longer have the throttled speeds to fall back on.

companies could be clear with the restrictions though, for example they could have a set data limit and then explain they will occasionally allow people to continue usage with a throttle on a limited basis and detail what those limits are

i believe most if not all MVNO structure their rate plan on the concept there will be a wide variance of usage up to the specified limit and on the month people hit the limit it may not be profitable but they are betting the lighter users balance it out.

i wish we had more in the way of traditional paygo at competitive prices such as what MobileX does. only part I do nto understand about MobileX is how they think a 'custom plan' that varies each month that lets you buy more or credits back what is unused is somehow easier to understand as opposed to billing for what is used as its used. in the end they are not charging for anything not used so why not just bill per KB at the $2.10/GB rate for data usage.
 
i don't know if MVNO's pay the same price per KB for throttled data as they do for full speed

if they do I am sure allowing very large amount of data at any speed for a low price would be cost prohibited

It's my understanding the MVNOs typically buy a bulk block of data and then distribute that among their plans how they wish. I don't know the particulars beyond that though. I do know that deprioritized data is cheaper but I wouldn't think the absolute speed of the data usage would come into play.
 
i wish we had more in the way of traditional paygo at competitive prices such as what MobileX does. only part I do nto understand about MobileX is how they think a 'custom plan' that varies each month that lets you buy more or credits back what is unused is somehow easier to understand
Likely just a limitation of the billing management system they bought into.

Really simpler to just state that it is "you only pay for what you use"

functionally equivalent to "data purchased never expires"

just like Tracfone PayGo or gFi Flex plan

except $2/GB instead of $10

and a much lower overall monthly cost

wrt TF, without committing to long term plans or jumping through bizarre hoops or tolerating crappy systems and poor CS

These models are ideal for low data use lines.

But for lines selected for hundreds of GB/mo shared among a household, that will ALWAYS require plans designed to "average out" such "abusive" users with the lower-use ones.

I'm sure VZW is not losing money on Visible overall and lots of their customers are approaching 1TB monthly

Same with my TMO "Go5G Plus Up" w/50GB hotspot at $40 in a group. Just got a login from them for streaming

Hulu, Disney+, Netflix, HBO Max, Paramount+ and PeacockTV

my kids are sure enjoying!

I don't think any MVNOs can compete with those, but if they try, that's on them it's just silly to blame the users as if it's a moral issue
 
People who abuse MVNO plans should be lined up against a wall and shot.


Back on topic, MobileX has a new “unlimited” plan where the throttle is 512kbps
 
thx but i'm looking for cheap bang for the buck.
i'm currently on mint mobile 5gig/128k unlimited on sale for $7.50/month for 3 months.

H2O's $100 annual plan 1gig/256k unlimited for $8/month seems better since i use about 1/2gig per day data

I'm about to buy h20's $100/yr plan.
Any know of coupon code or specials?
 
I'm about to buy h20's $100/yr plan.
Any know of coupon code or specials?
I am not aware of any discount for the initial purchase. You can get a $20 referral credit (received after signing up) but I'm not sure if you can use it until next year's plan renewal. It might be usable for international roaming.

If you would like a referral, you can PM me.
 
People who abuse MVNO plans should be lined up against a wall and shot.


Back on topic, MobileX has a new “unlimited” plan where the throttle is 512kbps

Why would that 512kbps throttle be useful? If one were to utilize the service as provided, that’s “abuse” and they should be lined up and shot if they use the service under the agreed upon specifications, if I understand you correctly.

Or am I missing something here?


Sent from my iPhone using HoFo
 
People who abuse MVNO plans should be lined up against a wall and shot
No that's a completely irrational hot take

"abuse" is as subjective as "gorgeous", on them to structure their service so it's sustainable

if the provider allows it, it's all fair game.

If the FCC / FTC were acting in the public interest, it would be illegal to use "unlimited" so deceptively, even a TB per month should be NP...
 
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