Vodafone Italy 4G

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I'm sorry if I triple post, but I want to ask you if for example using my iPhone 6S I would have troubles with American carriers or if it supports all the necessary bands. Model sold in Europe is A1688, can you check on Apple website and let me know? Because I always see that Apple creates a special version of iPhone just for the US market.
Speaking of VoLTE I want to add that when I'm calling on LTE and I go in area without LTE the call doesn't drop, it switches from LTE or 3G (or 2G) and the calls keep on going on. I don't know in the US, but in Italy Vodafone just made VoLTE available for certain devices like iPhone 6 and newer or Galaxy with brand Vodafone software, or some LG and so on. If you have a Galaxy S5 no brand Vodafone you won't get it, if you have a brand Vodafone one you will get it. How does it work in the US?
Audio quality calls is 12.2 normally, 12.6 Vodafone to Vodafone 3G-3G or 3G-LTE, and Vodafone to Vodafone LTE-LTE (VoLTE) should be 25,2.


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I'm sorry if I triple post, but I want to ask you if for example using my iPhone 6S I would have troubles with American carriers or if it supports all the necessary bands. Model sold in Europe is A1688, can you check on Apple website and let me know? Because I always see that Apple creates a special version of iPhone just for the US market.
Speaking of VoLTE I want to add that when I'm calling on LTE and I go in area without LTE the call doesn't drop, it switches from LTE or 3G (or 2G) and the calls keep on going on. I don't know in the US, but in Italy Vodafone just made VoLTE available for certain devices like iPhone 6 and newer or Galaxy with brand Vodafone software, or some LG and so on. If you have a Galaxy S5 no brand Vodafone you won't get it, if you have a brand Vodafone one you will get it. How does it work in the US?
Audio quality calls is 12.2 normally, 12.6 Vodafone to Vodafone 3G-3G or 3G-LTE, and Vodafone to Vodafone LTE-LTE (VoLTE) should be 25,2.


Inviato dal mio iPad utilizzando Tapatalk
Your model iPhone 6S is actually the one sold by 3 out of 4 carriers - Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile. It also works on the fourth, AT&T, but they don't sell that model because it lacks band 30 LTE. It's fine though since that's a new and relatively rare band - it's used for data capacity in cities.

LTE bands:
T-Mobile 2, 4, 12
Sprint 25, 26, 41
Verizon 2, 4, 13
AT&T 2, 4, 5, 12/17, 29, 30

On AT&T and T-Mobile, VoLTE hands off to 3G because they're GSM/HSPA+ carriers. On Verizon there's no hand off because they're CDMA. Most likely the reason why CDMA Sprint hasn't rolled out VoLTE.

For VoLTE, they all use AMR-WB 12.6. T-Mobile also uses it on 3G/HSPA+. T-Mobile just started upgrading to EVS, though, which is better than regular HD Voice / AMR-WB:
https://blog.networks.nokia.com/mob...pecial-wait-til-hear-enhanced-voice-services/
 
For landline discussion, maybe try DSLReports forums. Do Vodafone and TIM compete against each other for Internet/landlines? If so how does that work? Do they share lines? Here's they're monopolies. You either have AT&T, Verizon, or some other smaller landline company. They compete against the cable companies, which have more marketshare because they're faster and higher speeds available in more places.

Sprint probably doesn't have VoLTE because they're a CDMA carrier, so there's no LTE to CDMA fallback. Their network isn't the best, so that would lead to lots of dropped calls. They're also very poor, but already have HD Voice via their CDMA network. They're still losing hundreds of millions of dollars each quarter - they've lost over $50 billion in the last few years. A Japanese company called Softbank bought them and wanted to merge them with T-Mobile, but thankfully that wasn't allowed. T-Mobile has since been very disruptive and changed the wireless market. I'm glad we never went to 3 carriers.

As far as towers, carriers pay big money to place their equipment on towers. They usually pay tower management companies like Crown Castle or American Tower. They also use roof tops and sides of buildings when needed. They can be anywhere. Water towers. Parking garages. Power poles, etc. They prefer fiber backhaul, but will use microwave when needed. Here's some photos of Sprint and T-Mobile towers:

http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6888-how-to-identify-t-mobile-network-equipment-ericsson/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6889-how-to-identify-t-mobile-network-equipment-nokia-networks/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6180-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-ericsson/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/3906-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-samsung/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/5657-how-to-spot-sprint-8t8r-td-lte-rrhs-nokia-networks/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/3915-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-alcatel-lucent/

There's also small cells and DAS all over big cities (on lamp posts, traffic signals, inside buildings, underground, etc).

EDIT: Forgot to answer best carrier. It depends what you want for best. If you want the fastest and best coverage, it's Verizon. They have the most customers for a reason. But they're also very expensive. For best value, T-Mobile, since they're very fast, keep expanding coverage, lots of plan benefits. For least expensive, if their coverage is okay in the area, Sprint is fine.
In Italy nobody has ever offered unlimited plans, just big amount of data like 20GB/month, but I never see unlimited plans, and sincerely I thought they weren't that expensive O: Here just TIM and Vodafone also offers TV solutions along with land lines, but if you have land line or TV they will discount your plan prices, hahahah. WIND also offers land lines plans, and 3 just mobile plans. Is there a thread where we can discuss about land lines?
Yes I know about Verizon paying Vodafone! I have to say thank you to Verizon because those $100 billion were distributed among Vodafone countries to improve the network and in Italy they created the so called "Spring plan" and they invested 1,8€ billion in order to improve mobile and fix lines.
Woah, 600Mhz, a lot of low bands! Coverage will be better and better! Which is , in your opinion, the best nationwide Carrier in the US? Why Sprint's VoLTE is still missing? I hated the first year in Italy when making or receiving a call made your phone fell back from LTE 800Mhz to 2G 900Mhz, that meant low quality calls. Only on band 3 and band 7 made the fall back on 3G 2100Mhz.
Anyway, Europe and the US look like two different world regarding telcos: different frequencies, different use of the same frequencies and so many differences in how telco markets work.
How is the towers market in the US? Do Carriers pay for having towers on the ground or rooftop? Do they use link radio or do they use fiber till the tower? Have you any pictures of towers?
Thank you :)
 
Do you know what LTE band the 700MHz in Europe is?

Yeah, I bet the majority of Americans don't even know what Whatsapp is. I'm not a big fan of it since it lacks a lot of features compared to Messenger. :p Telegram even more rare here. What's sad is that SMS costs the carriers nothing to send and receive. Should just be unlimited. In Mexico I can get unlimited minutes, SMS, Whatsapp, Facebook, Twitter, Messenger, and 200MB data for under $6 a month. AT&T just bought two carriers there - don't know how they plan on making money, haha.
I didn't know the existence of the APT plan, thank you so much. Anyway, yes, in Europe band 700Mhz is going to be used in the future by the carriers that bought the licenses. We are also deploying band 1500Mhz, but it will be just to improve download link. In Italy just Vodafone and TIM bought the licenses. I don't know why the others act like nothing it's important, I think the only solution is they don't have money.

OMG, I thought Whatsapp was worldwide:lol: in Europe if you don't have Whatsapp on your phone it means you're a kind of loser hahahah, like in China, if you don't have WeChat you're cut off the rest of the world. Of course, we use Facebook Messenger and Telegram too, but I refused to use Telegram otherwise my phone would have been on fire, too many notifications from different apps. Here carriers offer buckets of SMS for just 2/3€,00/month, but you know just old people use them LOL that's why some new plans from Vodafone don't have SMS anymore. Like a new one 1000minutes, 3GB, unlimited minutes to a Vodafone number, hotspot for just 8,00€/month!

Hahahah, yes I always want to finish all my data by the expire date, because I pay for it, but now it expires on the 12th, and this past month I've been around Italy for travelling and now for the past 4 days I'm being careful not to use Snapchat, Instagram or Facebook, just Whatsapp or iMessage and when I need to load huge amount of data I'll connected to iPad using hotspot or just use the iPad.
 
Your model iPhone 6S is actually the one sold by 3 out of 4 carriers - Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile. It also works on the fourth, AT&T, but they don't sell that model because it lacks band 30 LTE. It's fine though since that's a new and relatively rare band - it's used for data capacity in cities.

LTE bands:
T-Mobile 2, 4, 12
Sprint 25, 26, 41
Verizon 2, 4, 13
AT&T 2, 4, 5, 12/17, 29, 30

On AT&T and T-Mobile, VoLTE hands off to 3G because they're GSM/HSPA+ carriers. On Verizon there's no hand off because they're CDMA. Most likely the reason why CDMA Sprint hasn't rolled out VoLTE.

For VoLTE, they all use AMR-WB 12.6. T-Mobile also uses it on 3G/HSPA+. T-Mobile just started upgrading to EVS, though, which is better than regular HD Voice / AMR-WB:
https://blog.networks.nokia.com/mob...pecial-wait-til-hear-enhanced-voice-services/

Oh cool, I'm glad Apple made a real world phone with all the bands needed. I'm planning a trip to the US, I want to see south states. If I want to have an American SIM card with LTE, how is the process? What documents they look for? Because in Italy it's super easy for Italians and foreigners: just ID card or passport if you're not Italian, and carriers also have special plans for tourist with a big amount of data and international calls.
I think that Verizon networks is the biggest LTE network in the US then, am I correct? Because if the network doesn't support fallback on 3G it would be a negative calling experience for users if they might go into an no LTE area.
EVS, mmh I didn't know about it! I'll look through the link, thank you so much!
Are HD quality calls possible between customers of different carriers? Like Tmo - Verizon, or AT&T - Sprint?
 
For landline discussion, maybe try DSLReports forums. Do Vodafone and TIM compete against each other for Internet/landlines? If so how does that work? Do they share lines? Here's they're monopolies. You either have AT&T, Verizon, or some other smaller landline company. They compete against the cable companies, which have more marketshare because they're faster and higher speeds available in more places.

Sprint probably doesn't have VoLTE because they're a CDMA carrier, so there's no LTE to CDMA fallback. Their network isn't the best, so that would lead to lots of dropped calls. They're also very poor, but already have HD Voice via their CDMA network. They're still losing hundreds of millions of dollars each quarter - they've lost over $50 billion in the last few years. A Japanese company called Softbank bought them and wanted to merge them with T-Mobile, but thankfully that wasn't allowed. T-Mobile has since been very disruptive and changed the wireless market. I'm glad we never went to 3 carriers.

As far as towers, carriers pay big money to place their equipment on towers. They usually pay tower management companies like Crown Castle or American Tower. They also use roof tops and sides of buildings when needed. They can be anywhere. Water towers. Parking garages. Power poles, etc. They prefer fiber backhaul, but will use microwave when needed. Here's some photos of Sprint and T-Mobile towers:

http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6888-how-to-identify-t-mobile-network-equipment-ericsson/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6889-how-to-identify-t-mobile-network-equipment-nokia-networks/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/6180-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-ericsson/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/3906-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-samsung/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/5657-how-to-spot-sprint-8t8r-td-lte-rrhs-nokia-networks/
http://s4gru.com/index.php?/topic/3915-how-to-spot-sprint-antennas-and-rrus-alcatel-lucent/

There's also small cells and DAS all over big cities (on lamp posts, traffic signals, inside buildings, underground, etc).

EDIT: Forgot to answer best carrier. It depends what you want for best. If you want the fastest and best coverage, it's Verizon. They have the most customers for a reason. But they're also very expensive. For best value, T-Mobile, since they're very fast, keep expanding coverage, lots of plan benefits. For least expensive, if their coverage is okay in the area, Sprint is fine.

OMG I love the threads with towers and cabinets pictures, I will look at them for hundred times:lol:
Italy is dived in 3 regions: Huawei, Nokia and Ericsson. In each region then each carrier has its own brand. For example in north of Italy Vodafone uses Nokia and TIM/3 use Ericsson, WIND instead is with Huawei. Each carrier pays also a lot here for having their towers. Towers can be on the ground, on the rooftops, on sides of building and so on. And yes same here, microcells in the parking lots, inside shopping malls, buildings, inside traffic lights or light towers on the street. How's the situation in the subways around the US? In Milan subway:
TIM and Vodafone: 2G 1800Mhz, 3G 2100Mhz, 4G B3 / B7 (1800Mhz/2600Mhz)
3: 3G 2100Mhz
WIND: 2G 1800Mhz, 3G 2100Mhz.
No WiFi hotspots in the subway.
Talking about land lines and backhaul:
TIM is part of the former Telecom Italia that was the first fix and mobile carrier in Italy, they monopolized everything. That's why land lines are property of TIM now and that's why they have more fiber underground than the others. So TIM prefers fiber backhaul for their towers, and that's bad because it takes too long to take fiber to one point to another and that's why their coverage is the second LTE coverage.
10 or more years ago, European Union said stop to monopolization and they decided to open each country's market to other carriers and competitors.
What's the situation now?
Most reliable carrier for land lines is still TIM, and I have TIM land line + cable TV at home too. But we are talking about DSL running on copper 20Mbps down and 1Mbps up speed, this is the maximum I can get in my city. Copper lines are still TIM owned, but they must share them with the others.
All others carriers like Vodafone, WIND, Fastaweb and Tiscali, use TIM copper lines, in the main "central house" where copper starts to run to each house in the city, TIM has its own equipment and if Vodafone and the others have their own equipment too you are lucky and you'll get 20Mbps down, if they don't have them and they use TIM's, your speed will be 3/4Mbps down and 0,40Mbps up. IT SUCKS.
BUT, in the past 5 years beginning from big cities, each carrier that wants to offer their own service started to created their own fiber network. In Milan for example Vodafone offers fiber up to 300Mbps down, Fastweb up to 200Mbps down and TIM just up to 100Mbps down. So you see, in big cities TIM becomes same or worse than the others.
Back to backhaul, Vodafone loves microwave because it's the only solution, they have fiber in some spots, but not everywhere, so they distribute bandwidth from those spots using microwaves. In middle/big cities of course they use fiber too. I like this solution because:
1) microwaves are not like fiber, it just takes very short time to make them work.
2) they cover much more cities than the others.
WIND has its own little fiber network but they use more microwaves.
3 doesn't have land lines or fiber so they just buy fiber from Fastweb in the cities and from TIM outside cities.
That's why cable TV started to exist 2 years ago! We still have the satellite number one pay tv in Italy: Sky TV, the same as in the UK or Germany.
 
Do you know what LTE band the 700MHz in Europe is?

Yeah, I bet the majority of Americans don't even know what Whatsapp is. I'm not a big fan of it since it lacks a lot of features compared to Messenger. :p Telegram even more rare here. What's sad is that SMS costs the carriers nothing to send and receive. Should just be unlimited. In Mexico I can get unlimited minutes, SMS, Whatsapp, Facebook, Twitter, Messenger, and 200MB data for under $6 a month. AT&T just bought two carriers there - don't know how they plan on making money, haha.

I can tell you that the band 700Mhz will be 694-790 MHz, and it will be free in 2020, waiting for TV to move their frequencies. I don't know which band it's going to be, but it'll be the same band in all European countries.
I don't like Facebook Messenger voice messages, they can be just 1 minute long :lol:
 
Oh cool, I'm glad Apple made a real world phone with all the bands needed. I'm planning a trip to the US, I want to see south states. If I want to have an American SIM card with LTE, how is the process? What documents they look for? Because in Italy it's super easy for Italians and foreigners: just ID card or passport if you're not Italian, and carriers also have special plans for tourist with a big amount of data and international calls.
I think that Verizon networks is the biggest LTE network in the US then, am I correct? Because if the network doesn't support fallback on 3G it would be a negative calling experience for users if they might go into an no LTE area.
EVS, mmh I didn't know about it! I'll look through the link, thank you so much!
Are HD quality calls possible between customers of different carriers? Like Tmo - Verizon, or AT&T - Sprint?
I don't think you need anything, to be honest. For prepaid I just buy SIM cards on eBay and activate online. No ID asked. If you're going to be in the South, I'm guessing you'll be in rural areas. In that case it's probably best to stick with AT&T and Verizon (and their MVNOs). Correct, Verizon has the largest network. A big problem they had was network density. Since they had 850MHz CDMA (excellent coverage ability) they had their towers spaced out far so when LTE came along they had to densify their network. And yes, there's cross carrier HD voice enabled.
 
OMG I love the threads with towers and cabinets pictures, I will look at them for hundred times:lol:
Italy is dived in 3 regions: Huawei, Nokia and Ericsson. In each region then each carrier has its own brand. For example in north of Italy Vodafone uses Nokia and TIM/3 use Ericsson, WIND instead is with Huawei. Each carrier pays also a lot here for having their towers. Towers can be on the ground, on the rooftops, on sides of building and so on. And yes same here, microcells in the parking lots, inside shopping malls, buildings, inside traffic lights or light towers on the street. How's the situation in the subways around the US? In Milan subway:
TIM and Vodafone: 2G 1800Mhz, 3G 2100Mhz, 4G B3 / B7 (1800Mhz/2600Mhz)
3: 3G 2100Mhz
WIND: 2G 1800Mhz, 3G 2100Mhz.
No WiFi hotspots in the subway.
Talking about land lines and backhaul:
TIM is part of the former Telecom Italia that was the first fix and mobile carrier in Italy, they monopolized everything. That's why land lines are property of TIM now and that's why they have more fiber underground than the others. So TIM prefers fiber backhaul for their towers, and that's bad because it takes too long to take fiber to one point to another and that's why their coverage is the second LTE coverage.
10 or more years ago, European Union said stop to monopolization and they decided to open each country's market to other carriers and competitors.
What's the situation now?
Most reliable carrier for land lines is still TIM, and I have TIM land line + cable TV at home too. But we are talking about DSL running on copper 20Mbps down and 1Mbps up speed, this is the maximum I can get in my city. Copper lines are still TIM owned, but they must share them with the others.
All others carriers like Vodafone, WIND, Fastaweb and Tiscali, use TIM copper lines, in the main "central house" where copper starts to run to each house in the city, TIM has its own equipment and if Vodafone and the others have their own equipment too you are lucky and you'll get 20Mbps down, if they don't have them and they use TIM's, your speed will be 3/4Mbps down and 0,40Mbps up. IT SUCKS.
BUT, in the past 5 years beginning from big cities, each carrier that wants to offer their own service started to created their own fiber network. In Milan for example Vodafone offers fiber up to 300Mbps down, Fastweb up to 200Mbps down and TIM just up to 100Mbps down. So you see, in big cities TIM becomes same or worse than the others.
Back to backhaul, Vodafone loves microwave because it's the only solution, they have fiber in some spots, but not everywhere, so they distribute bandwidth from those spots using microwaves. In middle/big cities of course they use fiber too. I like this solution because:
1) microwaves are not like fiber, it just takes very short time to make them work.
2) they cover much more cities than the others.
WIND has its own little fiber network but they use more microwaves.
3 doesn't have land lines or fiber so they just buy fiber from Fastweb in the cities and from TIM outside cities.
That's why cable TV started to exist 2 years ago! We still have the satellite number one pay tv in Italy: Sky TV, the same as in the UK or Germany.
That's really interesting to read about your Internet! Here the landline monopolies don't share their networks with other big companies. Verizon has fiber (FiOS) in the Northeast (New York/Boston part of the country) while AT&T has chunks of the south and west. They're really picky about their fiber rollout and has data caps so lots of people go with coaxial cable like Comcast, Time Warner, or Cox. They're usually much faster. Do your Internet plans at home have caps or limits to them? Or are they completely unlimited?

As far as subways go, many of them have DAS that allows carriers to have coverage down there, at least in the stations. I'm not really familiar with them since California doesn't really have them (unless you count the LA Metro as one).

Here carriers really prefer fiber for their towers. In some rural hard to reach towers they get microwave, but most towers get fiber. That slowed LTE rollout sometimes but it makes for quick speed upgrades as they keep adding capacity. They use any company, not just their own fiber (in fact, Sprint and T-Mobile don't have their own fiber, but they use AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner, etc). Same goes for Verizon and AT&T. In some parts of the country you'll find Verizon towers with AT&T fiber backhaul.

What carrier has the most towers in Italy? Are they the most dense network? I ask because a few years ago, the largest network in the US (Verizon) had far fewer towers than the smallest carrier (T-Mobile) which had tiny coverage. That really helped T-Mobile for LTE capacity (they had no low band spectrum before). In some dense cities like NYC and SF they have towers at every other intersection.
I can tell you that the band 700Mhz will be 694-790 MHz, and it will be free in 2020, waiting for TV to move their frequencies. I don't know which band it's going to be, but it'll be the same band in all European countries.
I don't like Facebook Messenger voice messages, they can be just 1 minute long :lol:
Oh we don't really see people doing voice messages on chat apps here. I've seen some Mexicans do that, though!
 
That's really interesting to read about your Internet! Here the landline monopolies don't share their networks with other big companies. Verizon has fiber (FiOS) in the Northeast (New York/Boston part of the country) while AT&T has chunks of the south and west. They're really picky about their fiber rollout and has data caps so lots of people go with coaxial cable like Comcast, Time Warner, or Cox. They're usually much faster. Do your Internet plans at home have caps or limits to them? Or are they completely unlimited?

As far as subways go, many of them have DAS that allows carriers to have coverage down there, at least in the stations. I'm not really familiar with them since California doesn't really have them (unless you count the LA Metro as one).

Here carriers really prefer fiber for their towers. In some rural hard to reach towers they get microwave, but most towers get fiber. That slowed LTE rollout sometimes but it makes for quick speed upgrades as they keep adding capacity. They use any company, not just their own fiber (in fact, Sprint and T-Mobile don't have their own fiber, but they use AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner, etc). Same goes for Verizon and AT&T. In some parts of the country you'll find Verizon towers with AT&T fiber backhaul.

What carrier has the most towers in Italy? Are they the most dense network? I ask because a few years ago, the largest network in the US (Verizon) had far fewer towers than the smallest carrier (T-Mobile) which had tiny coverage. That really helped T-Mobile for LTE capacity (they had no low band spectrum before). In some dense cities like NYC and SF they have towers at every other intersection.

Oh we don't really see people doing voice messages on chat apps here. I've seen some Mexicans do that, though!

Landlines plans in Italy offer unlimited internet at maximum speed available and unlimited calls to landlines and mobile lines, with no distinction between carriers. But if you are with a landline company that doesn't have its own equipment (DSLAM, fiber and so on), but it uses TIM equipment, your speed will be slower than the others, TIM customers have priority on the other customers. Also fiber plans are unlimited and they offer services like cable TV or SIM Card to be used on your tabler outdoor. Every carrier also gives you its own branded router, like Vodafone and its Vodafone Station Revolution:
http://www.vodafone.it/portal/Priva...--ADSL-e-Telefono/Vodafone-Station-Revolution
Here you can get an idea of Vodafone 2G, 3G, 4G and 4G+ coverage:
http://www.vodafone.it/portal/Privati/Vantaggi-Vodafone/rete-veloce-4G
You need to scroll down and select "Verifica Copertura"
ca17f236d5dc986f305b3d1246e13012.jpg

Fiber backhaul would be cool if it works like in the US, but here TIM doesn't want to share its big fiber with the competitors -.- In the past 2 years Vodafone definitely has the most towers in the country. Thanks to "Spring Plan" and its huge amount of euros, they started to densify their network. Where I live Vodafone has 5 towers, 4 towers have been update to LTE, and Three just 2 towers, no LTE towers for Three, you see how their coverage is really spotty.
Do carriers in the US share towers? In Italy TIM and Vodafone made an agreement in order to share their towers so they don't need to build a new one if there's already one. 3 and WIND also made the agreement but shared towers are spotty. TIM also has an agreement with RAI (Italian state TV) and they can use RAI antennas towers. WIND instead made an agreement with ENEL (electrical state company), WIND uses ENEL trellises for microwaves and so on.
In Milan, Vodafone, is first carrier for customers and towers of any kind, and their LTE network is super fast and reliable, all the city is covered by LTE Advanced B3+B7.
In the subways coverage is provided in the stations and in tunnels and that's really good. In Rome they don't have such a good coverage in subways, I've been abroad and I found the same problem in other cities.
Hahahah, voice messages are very common around here, I think we learn from the Chinese people, they love voice messages.
 
Landlines plans in Italy offer unlimited internet at maximum speed available and unlimited calls to landlines and mobile lines, with no distinction between carriers. But if you are with a landline company that doesn't have its own equipment (DSLAM, fiber and so on), but it uses TIM equipment, your speed will be slower than the others, TIM customers have priority on the other customers. Also fiber plans are unlimited and they offer services like cable TV or SIM Card to be used on your tabler outdoor. Every carrier also gives you its own branded router, like Vodafone and its Vodafone Station Revolution:
http://www.vodafone.it/portal/Priva...--ADSL-e-Telefono/Vodafone-Station-Revolution
Here you can get an idea of Vodafone 2G, 3G, 4G and 4G+ coverage:
http://www.vodafone.it/portal/Privati/Vantaggi-Vodafone/rete-veloce-4G
You need to scroll down and select "Verifica Copertura"
ca17f236d5dc986f305b3d1246e13012.jpg

Fiber backhaul would be cool if it works like in the US, but here TIM doesn't want to share its big fiber with the competitors -.- In the past 2 years Vodafone definitely has the most towers in the country. Thanks to "Spring Plan" and its huge amount of euros, they started to densify their network. Where I live Vodafone has 5 towers, 4 towers have been update to LTE, and Three just 2 towers, no LTE towers for Three, you see how their coverage is really spotty.
Do carriers in the US share towers? In Italy TIM and Vodafone made an agreement in order to share their towers so they don't need to build a new one if there's already one. 3 and WIND also made the agreement but shared towers are spotty. TIM also has an agreement with RAI (Italian state TV) and they can use RAI antennas towers. WIND instead made an agreement with ENEL (electrical state company), WIND uses ENEL trellises for microwaves and so on.
In Milan, Vodafone, is first carrier for customers and towers of any kind, and their LTE network is super fast and reliable, all the city is covered by LTE Advanced B3+B7.
In the subways coverage is provided in the stations and in tunnels and that's really good. In Rome they don't have such a good coverage in subways, I've been abroad and I found the same problem in other cities.
Hahahah, voice messages are very common around here, I think we learn from the Chinese people, they love voice messages.
Yes, carriers share towers here in the US. Most towers are owned by tower management companies such as Crown Castle or American Tower, and carriers pay them monthly leases to colocate on their towers. So it's common to see 1 to 4 carriers on a single tower. So basically put, carriers don't own their own towers (they use to, but in the past years they've all sold their towers for billions of dollars to American Tower and Crown Castle). I think here they share their fiber because nobody has a truly nationwide fiber network. AT&T might have a lot of fiber in some parts of the country, Verizon in other parts, and so on. Then there's always the cable providers, who also have fiber in their own parts of the country (where also Verizon and AT&T have fiber).

If Wind has an agreement with ENEL, can they place small cells on power poles? Or does Italy not have above ground power poles? I imagine in an LTE world that would create an amazing network if they have access to all power poles.
 
In Italy nobody has ever offered unlimited plans, just big amount of data like 20GB/month, but I never see unlimited plans, and sincerely I thought they weren't that expensive O: .....
Actually, Wind had an unlimited data bolt-on for 20€/mo but that was back in the GPRS days. (Trivia)
 
Hi everyone! I'm back and I'll share with you some vodafone IT LTE speed tests:
B20 (800Mhz) 10x10, outside big cities:
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B3 (1800Mhz) 15x15, Milan subway, Saturday night:
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CA B3 + B20 (1800Mhz + 800Mhz), 15x15 + 10x10:
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CA B7 + B3 (2600Mhz + 1800Mhz), 15x15 + 15x15, Milan downtown:
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Wow, those are some great speeds! When I was in Milan in August of last year, I was going to get a Vodafone SIM, but unfortunately they were closing and I was forced to buy one from 3. Coverage in the city center and at the Expo was great, and I typically got around 60 mbps down, but at the apartment where I was staying (outside the city center but still within the city) it would roam voice-only on TIM. Around Lake Como things were pretty spotty but I was able to get some 3G and 4G in the city of Como itself.
 
Wow, those are some great speeds! When I was in Milan in August of last year, I was going to get a Vodafone SIM, but unfortunately they were closing and I was forced to buy one from 3. Coverage in the city center and at the Expo was great, and I typically got around 60 mbps down, but at the apartment where I was staying (outside the city center but still within the city) it would roam voice-only on TIM. Around Lake Como things were pretty spotty but I was able to get some 3G and 4G in the city of Como itself.

Yeah, Vodafone is the most reliable network in Italy, now it's getting ready to launch three carriers aggregation 800+1800+2600 up to 300Mbps. They're also launching dual carrier aggregation using frequencies of different antennas.
3 it's good in big cities, but as you saw outside cities you might be roaming on TIM. Now things are changing, roaming will be soon on WIND, in the future 3 and WIND are going to merge if the EU will let them, this is going to help to improve their coverage and LTE speed.


Inviato dal mio iPad utilizzando Tapatalk
 
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